SATURDAY, AUGUST 23, 2014
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Sigma Level

A Method for Aligning the Six Sigma Performance Metric

Some Six Sigma practitioners are concerned about the current method used to calculate Z-scores and express process capability. A proposed modification, based on Berryman’s scorecard, may fill the need for a more intuitive and business savvy metric.

Customer CTQs – Defining Defect, Unit and Opportunity

In order for any process capability to accurately be calculated, one must properly define and quantify the process defect, unit and opportunity of a customer CTQ. This article defines the three terms, as well as provides examples.

Finding the Sigma Level of Customer Complaints

Although customer survey data is often used to determine the degree of customer satisfaction, it is worthwhile to consider recorded complaints data in order to calculate the number of actual complainers and the number of possible complainers.

How to Calculate Process Sigma

Calculating your process sigma can be accomplished in 5 simple steps: Define your opportunities, define your defects, measure your opportunities and defects, calculate your yield, look-up process sigma. This article includes all the tools you need.

Should You Calculate Your Process Sigma?

Practitioners must learn when and how to calculate the sigma level of a process.

Sigma Performance Levels – One to Six Sigma

When learning about Six Sigma, it may help to consider these charts, which detail how sigma level relates to defects per million opportunities (DPMO), and some real-world examples.

Using Weighted-DPMO to Calculate an Overall Sigma Level

An organization can have difficulty telling its overall sigma level because some of its critical processes are more important to its operations than others. One approach is to weight each of the critical processes when calculating overall sigma level.

Zero Defects: What Does It Achieve? What Does It Mean?

The use by business strategists of slogans such as zero defects to spur quality in an organization may lead to a de-emphasis of the tried-and-true tools and culture associated with successful continuous improvement programs such as Six Sigma.

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