iSixSigma

Brit

Forum Replies Created

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 100 posts - 1 through 100 (of 477 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #148389

    Brit
    Participant

    Thank  You  “Real” Brit for  being  so  patient and  kind .From  now-on  I  will  select  another  screen  name.I  appreciate  greatly your decent personality ,best  wishes

    0
    #148386

    Brit
    Participant

    Brit – any chance of you ro I addint a last initial so anyone who cares knows that we are not the same person?
    I could be BritW or you could do it. Either way, it would help.
    Thanks

    0
    #148383

    Brit
    Participant

    Oh my.  Not sure of your backgraound Alex, but please read the New to Six Sigma link on the left and search for sigma level, DPMO, et al.  I hope you will explain it a bit differently next time you are asked.  Your response was wrong in that sigma level has nothing to do with the +/- 3 sigma control limits as you described in your first full paragraph.
    If you are a black belt – get your money back.
     

    0
    #148382

    Brit
    Participant

    We  all  in  this  Forum  should  apperciate  your  efforts to  submit informative  answers with  relevant  links.We are  lucky  to  have  such  a  person  in  our  Forum.Many  thanks  to  you

    0
    #148370

    Brit
    Participant

    Agree.Certification without  experience  is  nothing??

    0
    #148369

    Brit
    Participant

    Very  Informative.Thank  You for  this  great Enlightenment

    0
    #148345

    Brit
    Participant

    QFD is  one  of  the  SS Tools?

    0
    #148344

    Brit
    Participant

    Please  explain why??

    0
    #148343

    Brit
    Participant

    Excellent  Post

    0
    #148327

    Brit
    Participant

    Thank You  Dale  for  the  Enlightenment

    0
    #148326

    Brit
    Participant

    Thank  You Stan

    0
    #148325

    Brit
    Participant

    For SS-GB : 4.5 CEU’s
    For Lean-SS: 5.0 CEU’s
    For SS-BB :????

    0
    #148324

    Brit
    Participant

    Unfortunatly companies  can  do whatever  they  like?You  have  little  chance  to  win  this  case,as  they  can  manipulate….

    0
    #148323

    Brit
    Participant

    Thank  You Mike  for the  enlightenment

    0
    #148197

    Brit
    Participant

    Six Sigma and Enron?  You can’t be serious!  Please don’t feed Phil anymore – not sure why he hasn’t jumped on this one yet.
    TVI – nice reply – time to work.

    0
    #148192

    Brit
    Participant

    Why  I  should  do  that?

    0
    #148163

    Brit
    Participant

    Phil:
    Not trying to justify Six Sigma or not justify it.  It is good for some and not for others.  My philosophy is do what works – whatever that might be. I actually use a combination of six sigma, lean, TOC, et. al.
    What I was trying to point out is that the previous poster did not do his research before making his statement.  Sic Sigma may have not worked for you – sorry. As long as it is still saving my org cash and makign processes better, I’m using it.  I’m sure others will as well.  Close minded people will limit your organization.
    Wake up!!!

    0
    #148154

    Brit
    Participant

    Either go 7 calendar days or go by pay period (2 weeks in most cases).

    0
    #148153

    Brit
    Participant

    Think QualityColorado has a point – wait a little bit before assuming that none of these use Six Sigma.  I can see why MESA wouldn’t – they had to spend how much on ISO? – probably a hard sell to increase the quality $ bucket for SS implementation. 
    Premier is a service industry providing improvement resources to healthcare – they do use and train six sigma (I know from first hand knowledge there – have a friend who works for them out of S.C.).  As a matter of fact – two posted jobs:

    Sr. Performance Engineer – St. Joseph, MO
    Sr. Performance Engineer – Spartanburg, SC, US.
    Have a “Six Sigma Green Belt – black belt ideal”  requirement for the position.
    And finally, you can go to the website of North Mississippi Medical Center and access their Malcomb Bladridge appication – it specifically sates on page 36:

    “Because we seek to also continuously enhance our performanceimprovement processes, we incorporated Six Sigma into our PI processes including training six leaders to the Black Belt level.”
    Ouch!

    0
    #61240

    Brit
    Participant

    We are doing the same in terms of adding duties to the sitter function. We are also removing non-sitter staff from the sitter responsibility (or looing at paying them at the same rate as a sitter).  This should show a cost reduction of about $78,000/yr.  We are insituting a rigorous training and orientation for the sitters – but that won’t help us reduce the usage of them – might actually increase it.  Heard some people were looking at virtual monitoring, but I am a bit skeptical.
    Hopefully others will have seen some innovative ideas out there.

    0
    #61239

    Brit
    Participant

    If you google catheter-related blood stream infections, you will find a lot of information.  CR-BSI refers to infections directly related to the use of catheters.  General BSI refers to all blood stream infections.  You don’t really calculate it – you count the instances.  Most are reported via a rate of either instances/# patients or instances/#patient days.
    Here’s a good guideline from the US CDC.
    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5110a1.htm

    0
    #148023

    Brit
    Participant

    I used video a lot in the past as well.  Only issue I ran into was the hawthorne/halo effect. If they know they’re being taped, you might get a false sense of “speed”.  People tend to work a little harder when they’re being watched. I’d be interested to hear the response to how parts are made – to order or continuous production.
    Also – why the need for the time study?

    0
    #148004

    Brit
    Participant

    Listen to villageidiots rely – sounds like you are too early to think about full scale six sigma.  The comments regarding efforts with well defined scopes are key.  Develop business drivers using the balanced scoercard and develop improvement efforts using lean or the DMAIC structure (again – like was said – avoid the heavy analytics at this point – it may be too complicated and will certainly run off the under-educated).  The scopes of your efforts need to be very limited at his point – find low hanging fruit and quick wins.  Target a project for no more than 30 days to start (or there abouts).  Find someone in leadership who is on your side and make sure they are a part of yoru start-ups.
     

    0
    #148002

    Brit
    Participant

    Claudiac:
    Wondering which particular positions you are examining?  Additionally, are you in the U.S.?  This will help me provide information regarding onbaording, trainng and tracking.  You also may want to post the same question on the healthcare forum fro this site. 

    0
    #147845

    Brit
    Participant

    Julie – if you post an email, I can send you an example

    0
    #61226

    Brit
    Participant

    If yo udoa search on this site or google, you will get a lot of returns.

    0
    #61225

    Brit
    Participant
    #61224

    Brit
    Participant

    John & Anoop:
    We have the same issues that John posted and have similar goals.  In addition to the physician issue, we also had an issue with lab/radiology results ready in a timely manner.  If we are asking the docs to round earlier, the tools have to be there for them to make it happen.  If they have to wait on results, then that pushes the DC time out as well.

    0
    #61218

    Brit
    Participant

    You’re right – there have to be others.  If yo upass along an email address I’ll send information and hope you do the same.  I work at
    Bay Medicl Center in Panama City, FL

    0
    #61215

    Brit
    Participant

    I would look into the hospitalist process.  Saved us about $1M a year in reduced LOS and increased capacity (filled).  Without that or gettign the docs to round earlier, the best bet is to move them from the floor once able – if not discharged, then to a different location for final paperwork or waiting.  Not many more options given JCAHO standards (if that’s what you folow).
    There are a couple of other strategies to consider for relieving room pressure:

    Eliminate bed holds for surgery patients (or reducing occurrences where nurses hold beds)
    Reduce internal transfers (have people go to patients instead of other way around)
    Synchronize admissions, transfers and discharges
    Schedule nursing home discharges earlier in the day
    Use multidisciplinary rounds in units other than the ICU’s
    Make sure utilization criteria is set AND FOLLOWED for tele, ICU, PACU beds
    Work with extended care facilities to increase their abilities to reduce ED visits
    Decrease use of inpatient beds by outpatients (we had this issue with surgeries)

    0
    #61212

    Brit
    Participant

    Are you in the U.S.?  If not, you might have different requirements.  U.S. patients cannot be discharged without a signed order from the physician. We do implement something called Hospitalists who can discharge a patinet and make selected rounds when the primary physician is unavailable or late.  Usually there is a phone conference between the primary and hositalist before discharge.  Other than that, a dummy order would be akin to a standing order, and that can’t be done in the U.S. for discharges – primarily becuase of the variability of patients, even with the same diagnosis.

    0
    #61210

    Brit
    Participant

    The reason to be concerned with discharge time is to ensure that a bed is available for a waiting patient.  So the actual discharge time might be one measure, but when the room is freed for turnover is another, maybe more important number. A patient can be moved to a discharge area/lounge if they are waiting for their conference or a final IV, et al.  This allows for the room to become available more quickly.  If patient satisfaction is a concern, take care to make the discharge area very patient and family friendly, else they will think you are just trying to get rid of them.

    0
    #61209

    Brit
    Participant

    We had the same preop assessment issue and localized it – saved about $600k in reduced cancelled surgeries.
    We closed our inventory system (we use Pyxis) – costs some dollars to implement, but reduced supply cost per surgery by about 18% – will pay for the system in less than 18 months.
    We are working on first surgery time, but we really don’t have a huge issue there.  We are finding that actualy the second and third scheduled surgeries are the trouble spots.  We are working on a better way to pre-set carts for the next surgery to reduce supply wait time, we have a coordination schedule with environmental so they can plan their room cleans, and we have implemented a Manager position for the business side of surgery top oversee the issues, if any.  We are also working on handoff between surgery-PACU-unit.  Found we had a short wait time after surgery, causing a need to have a longer break between events.

    0
    #147394

    Brit
    Participant

    If you are doing six sigma, then it is the means by which you achieve quality.  If you do other things with it (or instead of it), they are also encompassed in your quality philosophy.  It, or any other “system” should not be a substitute for a quality philosophy. I agree with Labowski, if your organization is not embracing quality as a part of everyone’s job, then you are simply doing projects and not a quality management system.
    I agree that you need people who help support the quality function – many of us would be without jobs if that wasn’t the case – but the methodology of six sigma or lean or TOC (et al) needs to be an engrained philosophy, not a project producer.
    My 2 cents

    0
    #61207

    Brit
    Participant

    Could you be more specific?  And what hospital are you with – just an FYI for the ret of us…

    0
    #147277

    Brit
    Participant

    I wanted to echo Quality Colorad’s post – excellent.
    To add, I think rewarding/penalizing six sigma “efforts” for the sake of making SS a part of a culture is counter-productive.  Reward can foster issues between people chosen to be on teams and those that aren’t.  In addition, retribution can cause issue between departments during cross functional events.  Need to reward based on results attained, not on the simple fact of using or not using SS.  If the results happen via the process and are accepted via chnage management, then the culture shift will happen.

    0
    #61206

    Brit
    Participant

    Without having their individual sample data for each location, you cannot calculate the CI manually.  If you do have individual points, like in the data you posted here, you can calculate it – please see my last email to you for the calculation.
    You could take the SSI for each location and get an overall CI for all locations, but not sure that would get you anywhere.
    Worried that they would publish the CI’s given their statement about instances of small sample size – at least there was a caveat concerning it in the opening statement.

    0
    #147189

    Brit
    Participant

    Short of redesigning the process….
    An additional option is to place cycle times to your individual steps and determine the constraint (i.e., TOC method).  Either redesign the constriant, add resources to it for faster first time yield, or implement a buffer supply.  Once completed, move to the next constraint. 

    0
    #61204

    Brit
    Participant

    First thing – doesn’t look like the data is normal, so your CI results will be suspect – especially if done on the computer and not choosing a proper distribution. However,
    You calculate the CI of the Mean with the variance unknown.  Any decent statistics book can show you this.  You will be using values from the t-distribution tables.  For some reason I can’t copy and paste – if you want the manual calculation, I can email it to you.
    In most cases you will be looking for the 95% confidence interval.  This means that you can be 95% confident that the true mean of your data falls within the interval calculated.

    0
    #147073

    Brit
    Participant

    I can’t add much to the posts already listed – the people/change management needs are a must.
    One addition I have had to implement during the improvement stage is Poka Yoke.  When you have people-intense systems such as healthcare, and make a process change, it is sometimes necessary to look into your systems to ensure that the process can’t be done the old way (not just by monitoring, but through system design). 
    For instance, say you change a process that removes a particular inventory item that could be used.  The use of that item may have caused quality issues or simply be too costly relative to other alternatives.  After making the process change and getting employee buy-in, you make the item unavailable so they can’t use it even if they wanted to. 
    Just an example, but this can be done in other improvement areas as well.  Doesn’t work all the time, but striving for defect proofing the system should be part of the improve and control process.  Dealing with the people and the system simultaneously often proves effective.

    0
    #61203

    Brit
    Participant

    This article might be helpful. 
    http://europe.isixsigma.com/ library/ content/ c060308b.asp
     
     

    0
    #146844

    Brit
    Participant

    Marlon:
    No it’s not dying.  Some companies are doing better at it than others. Some have abandoned it altogether and some are just starting up with SS.  If the process works use it, if it doesn’t, use something else.  I have seen SS succeed and fail, and it is rarely due to the DMAIC methodology or the tools used within.  The structure of any improvement system will more than anything dictate its success.  If leadership changes, the process can be affected as well.
    Don’t believe the hype.  No company lost 60,000 jobs because of 6 sigma.  People who believe that have either never been in business, been in one that had layoffs, or are very naive.  Or, they are so sold on one methodology that they spend their energy bashing everything else.
    Since you asked, combining Lean and SS is the current trend.  Including TOC and additional methods is also being done.  Seems like some people are waking up to the fact that many of these ideas have positives to offer, especially when combined.

    0
    #146805

    Brit
    Participant

    Actually – understanding your distribution has value apart form whether you like six sigma or not.  The entire field of probability distributions has value for a number of reasons and has been around far longer than six sigma.  I’m not a math guy, but control charting has its place as do distributions.  Unfortunately, density functions are sometimes dificult to explain to the lay person when you are approximating data’s shape. 
    Shewart had it right when you don’t know the exact distribution, but approximating a probability of a defect or occurence within boundaries can’t be done with control charts as effectively as finding the area of the shape unde a distribution curve – if that’s the question you are trying to answer.  Both the chart and the math have there place.
    My 2 cents

    0
    #146772

    Brit
    Participant

     I agree with Darth – unless you are sadistic, you probably don’t want to get into the actual calculation. But, if you are into mind-pain, here’s a link from the NIST that gives the function in relation to the chi-square and gamma distributions.  I’m glad there are tables…..
    http://www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/eda/section3/eda3665.htm

    0
    #61202

    Brit
    Participant

    Our model is being structured now.  I will certainly follow up as I get more design information.  Basically it is a design where the RN still has overall care duties for particular patients, however duties that can be done by LPNs are delegated by the Nurse, allowing for a samll increase in nurse/patient ration with no increase in physical workload.

    0
    #61200

    Brit
    Participant

    We are in the same boat (community hospital, physician rounding issues, etc.).  I did an interesting analysis by unit showing how much later on average our discharges are than our admissions -essentially admitting patinets beofre we discharge, causing a bed issue.
    We also have nurse shortage issues and are temporarily being addressed via agency nurses – but that won’t last long ($).  We have put in a hospitalist program to assist in moving patinets out that can be, however, since the presiding physicians aren’t “our” doctors, we still have discharge issues.  On MD even likes to do rounds at 11:30 at night!  Frustrating.
    As we move to the different model of care, it will be imperative that the Rns have a complete understanding of the care via the MDs.  Basically we are moving  many Rns into a group management role for LPNs and others.  We are moving their responsibility, not adding to their time.  Does two things – allows you to run with less RNs and filling LPN positions is a bit easier.  Also increases the level of care understanding and teamwork between physician and nurse.

    0
    #61198

    Brit
    Participant

    We used to have it and moved away from it – now we are going back.  We ar chnaging our nursing system to a patinet/team-centered model of care.  In the model, RN’s will round with physicians to help manage their LPN’s and techs.  We don’t plan on having this in place until March 07, so sorry I couldn’t be more help.

    0
    #61196

    Brit
    Participant

    If you would like to post yours I will email you mine.

    0
    #146638

    Brit
    Participant

    Do you actually have a question?  This is getting old.

    0
    #61194

    Brit
    Participant

    This link will help. It’s from the U.S. CDC and gives the calculation and some national results.
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/nnis/2004NNISreport.pdf
     

    0
    #146484

    Brit
    Participant

    Thanks Stan – figured on eof you guys would know. The memo I had had proprietary on it, so better safe than sorry form my end.

    0
    #146480

    Brit
    Participant

    The first time I saw it was in JMP.  I requested a distribution, giving average time of day for a hospital unit discharge.  The histogram showed time buckets in terms of normal time format.  The moments were in numerical form, such as the 53355.29.  I am assuming they’re seconds after 12 AM, but not entirely positive.  I have also seen this output in minitab. My mistake on excel – they do not have a function that will convert this number. I tried to find one so that I could backtrack the calculation. I may have missed it, but all I could find was Julian and Serial conversions, neither are right for this number.

    0
    #146477

    Brit
    Participant

    I learned it via GEAE Six Sigma Training Supplier Blackbelt Workshop in 1998.  There was a memo in the material from the GEAE Six Sigma Council giving a graph that basically explains the idea.  Can’t share the graphic – it is proprietary to GE. Maybe a GE guy on the forum has access and can provide to you.

    0
    #146398

    Brit
    Participant

    I have a time output:  53355.29
    I want the time output in “o’clock” format (h:m:s).
    I want to know the calculation to convert 53355.29 to h:m:s
    I believe it is 53355.29/3600 seconds = 14.821 hrs + 12 AM = 2:49:15
    Wanted confirmation or clarification on the calculation

    0
    #146393

    Brit
    Participant

    Thanks Stan – agree totally.

    0
    #146392

    Brit
    Participant

    I understand how to do that in excel – wanted to know the calculation to convert so when I get it in JMP and minitab that I can convert it and explain it to others. 
    Googled, but not sure what to google for.  Not sure what the time format is called when it looks like 34455.29

    0
    #146385

    Brit
    Participant

    Here is a possibility:
    Small Z(ST:less than 3) & Large Z(Shift: Greater than 1.5) = Poor Consistency and Equipment
    Small Z(ST:less than 3) & Small Z(Shift: Less than 1.5) = Poor Consistency and Poor Equipment
    Large Z(ST:less than 3) & Large Z(Shift: Greater than 1.5) = Poor Consistency and Good Equipment
    Large Z(ST:Greater than 3) & Large Z(Shift: Greater than 1.5) = World Class Consistency and Equipment

    0
    #146341

    Brit
    Participant

    Large plus Z or large minus Z?

    0
    #146337

    Brit
    Participant

    I tried to list some links, but think the post got screened for some reason.  Do a google on Navy six sigma, army six sigma, and federal six sigma.  You will get many returns.
    Not sure about statistics, but tere is a benchmarking co out there that might have something for you.
    http://www.sixsigmabenchmarking.com/

    0
    #146330

    Brit
    Participant

    I agree with Marlon. Sorry your experience has been tainted.  Sounds like you may have a process management issue with aligning projects to your strategic goals.  I’m sure saving/finding cash is a strategic goal, but whoever picked the phone thing was just silly.  Good luck and hope you continue the methodology with better results.

    0
    #146256

    Brit
    Participant

    Forward me your email and I will forward an exercise.

    0
    #146255

    Brit
    Participant

    Thanks heebee and others for the remarks, but I can take this one.
    Pom Pom:
    Either you have no experience in a six sigma start-up (or other process improvement initiative) or you are dense and cannot understand my post.  I specifically mentioned not to do what you complained about.  No slogans, just substance.
    Are you naive enough to think you shouldn’t spread the word about a new initiaitive as large in scope as Six Sigma?  Do you work in the kind of place where quality improvement is a one departmetn iitiative – damn all others!  There needs to be some way that you get the initiative introduced to employees who don’t live six sigma every day so they understand a new strategic direction for your organization.  In the post provided, this seemed to be the case since the person was doing six sigma, but had to spread it around.  In your post, I didn’t hear anything that would have helped the poster – so how would you spread the word about this implementation?  How would you get volunteers to want to be a part of the process?  You probably wouldn’t.
    If you follow the information share with your own company’s results, then the system is believable.  If you POM POM them with other’s results, then you will fail.  Teach the people about real things that are going on in their world and not just vague concepts.  Do this as often as possible and in as many innovative ways as possible. Your failure in getting as many people involved an knowledgeable will be your downfall.
    Results are what should be shared when you are trying to spread the word about a new initiative.  Apparently you have been a victim of management not doing this.  I’m sorry you feel training and information sharing is smoke and mirrors.  That will play a large role in the way employees perceive you,so if you plan to advance, I would hope that you would change your views a bit (note – I have no idea who you are since you used an alias, but by your comments, I assumed you are fairly green at this).  I have lived it from an employee perspective, an owner’s perspective and a Director’s perspective. I know that it is impossible to have everyone in my organization become six sigma experts.  I also know that it is very important that everyone be linked to the strategic plan, meaning linked in some way via training/information to the initiatives that make up that plan.
    If you have any doubt about the quality of advice I provide on this forum, I suggest you look around a bit more.  I don’t have to prove anything about my success in terms of projects, I let the results speak for themselves and let the employees that work for me understand their role and six sigma’s role in them as well.
    Hope you find peace in your life and you get back the 15 mintues that you wasted on your last post.  Good Luck.

    0
    #146224

    Brit
    Participant

    Promote, publish and scream out results.  Team summaries, benefits, names of people involved, celebration of successes, etc.  Stay away from the logos and slogans (yes some of us SS guys like Deming too).  You need to have educational experiences.  One thing we did was called a lunch and learn, where we invited many people into a lunch and gave them the basics during the 1/2 hour or hour.  We now do this quarterly.  We also have a AV set-up in the cafeteria where part of the monthly “show” is devoted to Lean SS learning and results.  Brief 10 minute presentations to department meetings may also help – what it is, how will you be affected, what it has done so far for you.  Brief- to the point.
    Your strategy is different if you are selling the concept or telling people this is the direction of the company.  Best bet is to do as much face time as possible rather than rely on paper/AV only.

    0
    #61192

    Brit
    Participant

    Here is a thread link from awhile back.. There’s one there from Univ of Michigan and I think some others.
    https://www.isixsigma.com/library/content/c020830f.asp
    Basically – make sure the report and presentation are different.  You should keep presentation information short and sweet – 15 minutes at most and have the most important stuff up front or you lose the CEO/CFO?etc.  The report may be detailed for future reference, contributions, calcualtions, and leverage across the organization.

    0
    #146215

    Brit
    Participant

    Here’s a start – italics are from the isixsigma.com dictionary.
     
    Lead Time
    The amount of time, defined by the supplier, that is required to meet a customer request or demand.  This is how long it takes you to fill an order (actually deliver/receive) or for someone to fill an order for you.
     
    Cycle TimeCycle time is the total time from the beginning to the end of your process, as defined by you and your customer. Cycle time includes process time, during which a unit is acted upon to bring it closer to an output, and delay time, during which a unit of work is spent waiting to take the next action.In a nutshell – Cycle Time is the total elapsed time to move a unit of work from the beginning to the end of a physical process. (Note, Cycle Time is not the same as Lead Time).
    The difference is LEAD is a “promised” time from order to delivery.  Cycle time is the processing time required from production/process start to finish (usually to th epoint of ‘ready to deliver or ship’).

    0
    #61191

    Brit
    Participant

    No – computer information system (i.e., electronic medical record, paperless order entry, paperless medication management, electronic bedboard management/tracming, etc.)
     

    0
    #146121

    Brit
    Participant

    Also – please visit the “New to Six Sigma” link on the sidebar as well.  It explains the meaning of sigma level, which is a different measure than standard deviation. It may be a bit harder to explain to the layperson, but it can be done.  Basically:
    Sigma = standard deviation
    Sigma Level = # of standard deviaitons you can fit between your process mean and one customer specification limit.  The better (more consistent the process around your mean) the more standard deivations will fit.  If you can fit 6 SD’s in the long run, then… 6 sigma.
    There’s more to it, but basically if yo ucan achieve this, then the expectation is at this level you would produce no greater than 3.4 defects per million chances for the defect to happen.
    Again – very basic explanation – there’s more to the story as you will find out.  But that’s proably good for now – until you have more questions.

    0
    #146120

    Brit
    Participant

    No. 
    To explain a bit on the thought process side, however….My assumption is that if your process is good enough to be at 5 sigma, then it is relatively stable.  For a stable process to change, something must be introduced- i.e., much of the special cause variation has been eliminated at 5 sigma.  If the process moves good or bad from the current, then a change has been introduced, so without doing anything, I doubt you would miraculously move to 6 sigma.

    0
    #146118

    Brit
    Participant

    If the time to produce A, B, C, D is the same, then it doesn’t matter if you are talking about 8 hours or 24.
    If you are talking about a different time to produce A vs. B vs. C, etc., then I would proportion the time out, if I could not meet the exact takt rate for each part calculated via dividing the customer demand by the available time.  The trick would be improving the process so that each step could produce at the takt rate (or actually better than the takt rate for future growth). That would be an intersting project.

    0
    #61189

    Brit
    Participant

    Omar – if you have the manpower.gumption, you can probably get your arrival/wait/process times from the face sheet used when someone enters the ED rahter than creating a new sign-in sheet.  We have been tracking our flow this way awaiting our CIS implementation in January. 

    0
    #145926

    Brit
    Participant

    First question asked should be what ‘could’ casue global warming.  If you are seeing if the issue really exists, then that should be the start.  From there, collect cause and effect data on the different variables and move forward with the most plausible.  Your hypothesis will change if you make the assumption that global warming does exist from the start.

    0
    #145920

    Brit
    Participant

    Total products = 250
    Total Time = 16
    Takt Rate = 250/16 = 15.625/hr
    Reduce the 16 by downtime and set-up and there’s your goal, assuming there is relatively little differnce in the time it takes to press part A vs. B vs. C, etc.
    Problem with takt time and takt rate is that people try to make it very complicated.  The nice thing about this flow tool is that it is simple.

    0
    #145830

    Brit
    Participant

    First – seems like if you met your lowered inventory target and you can’t produce because of waiting on inventory, then your targets are too low.
    Second – producing what is capable and what is needed may be two very different things.  I like getting intot he Theory of Constraints on these types of issues.  Can you sell more than you make?  If so, then you constraint is within your process and may well be the inventory issue.  If you can produe more than you can sell, then your constraint is the external market.  If your not familiar with TOC, I believe there is information under methodologies on the left-side blue bar on this web page.  If not, research Eliyahu Goldratt’s stuff.
    As far as the productivity, the measure previously mentioned is one I would use, if you have to have one.  Remember, it is the actual planned capacity that you are concerned with, not overall.  If you staff for 80% capacity or have machinery running for that amount, then you need to use that value in the denominator.
    BTW-I try not to use productivity too much in my measurements, although it is hard to convince mangement because they don’t know better.  First question is are you meeting customer demand, on time, with better quality than the competitor (s).  Second is how much does it cost you to produce each unit.  These are where I would start and leave productivity for some later date.  Productivity measurements tend to disregard costs and provide a goal that, in some cases, can produce waste

    0
    #145827

    Brit
    Participant

    Right – the actual takt time doesn’t change.  If you are altering staffing levels, however, then the pace at which each person will produce to meet the takt time (in a manual process) will change.  If a step requires 20 parts per hour produced via takt rate, 6 people producing at 20 per hour will work harder/faster than 10 people producing at 20 per hour. So the expectation under this staffing model would change or your process step would change it’s hourly rate of production (i.e., not be balanced throughout the day) so that th etotal at the end of the day could be met.
    Best suggestion would be to have a consistent amount of employees and produce consistently to meet forecasted demand – however labor costs would increase. 
    His question was about available time, which I think was answered earlier.  However, his concern seemed to be the allocation of takt time to labor and how the system should run to meet demand.  That’s how I took it.

    0
    #145817

    Brit
    Participant

    Good point. That is one reason why I chose to implement under one structure with many tools available.  Also have only one group responsible for the improvements so that project responsibilities aren’t spread out.

    0
    #61181

    Brit
    Participant

    Another thought would be to examine correlations between staffing levels and patients seen.  In my experience, there isn’t a significant correlation, especially in the ED.  However, if you find one, then you can use regression to assist in establishing expected staffing levels. Not sure control charting will get you there for budgeting and staffing.

    0
    #145802

    Brit
    Participant

    Seems like this post is in agreement – I’d like to add one thought.
    In organizations where a process has not been introduced, it is godd to have some type of structure.  I like the DMAIC structure and then apply the tools that are needed depending on the problem (lean, ss, toc, etc.).  This provides a framework however leaves flexibility to use the tools that will provide the most good.
    In my org, we either have a long project for a complicated issue (no real solution available) or do a Kaizen event for other issues that can be more readily solved. In any case, we use the same framework of DMAIC.  Org used to use PDCA, but found that controls were rarely in place to prevent reverting back to the old ways.
    my 2 cents

    0
    #145796

    Brit
    Participant

    Maybe it should be:
    good output/planned capacity = productivity
    people planned capcity would need to take into account downtime, etc.
    Machinery planned capcity may be altered through a day or week based on demand, etc.
    Warning – don’t reward for greater than 100% in most cases – you don’t want to promote overproduction.

    0
    #145793

    Brit
    Participant

    Takt time, like you said, is the beat of the process.  The takt rate will be the rate you have to produce in each step to meet cutomer demand over a given period of time. Takt time will not change for the entire process – unless your rate of customer demand changes.
    Your individual steps will need to run at a certain rate to meet hourly customer demand (hourly takt time).  Depending on the availability at different times during the day , your operators will need to work at different paces, assuming each operator is expected to produce equally.  As you have it stated, it seems like you expect more production per hour as you get more people.  This would not be a supportive function of line balancing and takt time, where a steady amount is produced throughout the day to meet th ecustomer demand.
    If you choose to keep the same staffing model, then you need to determine how much should be produced at any one hour to meet the end of the day demand, and adjust production accordingly (i.e., pace those number of employees to meet the demand).
    for instance, if you needed to have 160 units at the end of an 8 hr shift, the takt rate would be 160/8 = 20 good units per hour.  Let’s say you have 6 people on at one time, 8 people on at a secnd time, then 10 people on at a third time, you can either:

    Have each group work at a pace of 20 per hour, meaning the 6 people will work harder than the 10; or
    Prescribe how much each staff level needs to produce to equal 160 by the end of the day.  Let’s say you had 6 people from 8-10, 8 people from 10-12, and 10 people from 12-4.  If you had each group run at a takt rate of 2.5 per person per hour, then you would end up with 170 at the end of the shift.

    0
    #145783

    Brit
    Participant

    Thomas Pyzdek has some good advice on how to pick a specific chart in this article…
    https://www.isixsigma.com/offsite.asp?A=Fr&Url=http://www.qualitydigest.com/feb98/html/spctool.html
     

    0
    #145719

    Brit
    Participant

    Marlon – She could use a u, p, np, etc chart for the evaluation of yields and efficiencies, depending on the specific type of data?  This would give her upper and lower control limits fo rthe discrete data.  Not sure where the spec limit comment came from – explain?

    0
    #145675

    Brit
    Participant

    I am certainly not an expert in banking, but you might find a better response from the financial forum (see the left side tool bar and ask the same question). Good luck!

    0
    #145672

    Brit
    Participant

    This can happen with no fault of the people.  Apparently it never became part of your culture, being referred to as a program.  If the new Plant Manager isn’t on board, then good luck.  If s/he can’t be convinced based on the results the “program” has delivered then good luck as well.  If the system is set up properly, then it can be a self sustaining one, but will be limited by the advocacy of your leadership.
    One question – why would no report be generated?  Seems like the people wanting to keep the initiaitve going would want to record their experiences or to leverage improvment opportunities across the plant. Not sure how big your plant is, but having 20+ six sigma representatives should be enough to re-structure, if you have produced positive results.
    My 2 cents. 

    0
    #145671

    Brit
    Participant

    Thanks.  There are many wise people here – hope others will recognizethat that and use the forum for what it’s intended.

    0
    #145665

    Brit
    Participant

    Circle:
    If you look at the first post reply in the lean thread, the question was answered.  The rest was either added value or crap, depending on your point of view. My response to Yoshi was sarcastic, to say the least, and meant to be that way.  His statement that boogaloo didn’t get an answer was wrong.  If he chooses to leave the forum and find solace elsewhere, more power to him.
    The “leaders” in this forum are certainly self proclaimed (although many have had years of experience and have produced some of the very results that have been touted by the lean six sigma industry) – and I certainly have not proclaimed nyself as one except in my own organization.  You are free to utilize those people or not.  When a serious question is asked, it will be answered.  When a confrontational comment is made (and made poorly), you can expect the reactions you saw in any forum.
    As for the circle jerk – well, it does happen from time to time.  People tend to ask similar questions.  After being on the site for years, I think I’ve seen “what is six sigma” about 100 times, and the answer is located in the left toolbar under “New to Six Sigma”, by the way. 
    Taking/asking advice has a rule – you get what you pay for, either monetarily or emotionally.  Some of us truly try to answer questions with as much vigor as we can.  I hope you feel you can contribute and ask questions when needed.  It has helped me in my career and hopefully I have helped others as well.
    Stan, Monk, Robert, Andy, Darth, Mike(s), etc. all have their own styles and points of view.  You, me and others can learn a lot from them.  Don’t know who you are since you decided to use Circle as your reference – so proclaiming yourself as an expert is certainly a self proclamation.  Good luck and hope you have a better day.

    0
    #145638

    Brit
    Participant

    Yashi – come back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0
    #145604

    Brit
    Participant

    Only problem I have found is if the MBB trainer isn’t very high in the organization.  It’s hard to fail a CEO if s/he doesn’t pass the certification. Actually, it’s not hard, but it’s a bit awkward to fail your boss.  Hopefully they will all pass.

    0
    #145582

    Brit
    Participant

    Not sure why you guys are so bent on thinking you can’t run a DOE on a producing process.  I have done it in steel mills (2), an alloy facility, a galsses manufacturer, and chemical plants (3).  It’s a little tougher for a continuous process, but it can be done without interrupting production. You simply have to be careful on the extent to which you make changes.  This is done all the time.    

    0
    #145581

    Brit
    Participant

    Wonderful suggestion.  Thanks for the advice.

    0
    #145537

    Brit
    Participant

    Thanks Eric.
    I was using Shapiro mostly and was just wondering if I was making a mistake – or more importantly, informing others to do the same.  Again – thanks for the reply.

    0
    #145497

    Brit
    Participant

    FTY would be the yield of the process without rework – what you got out of it the first time a part passed through.

    0
    #57101

    Brit
    Participant

    Andy – went ahead and did the hand calculation using the binomial probability function.  How I interpreted your question was probability of finding less than 80% defective out of a 50 part sample with a 90% success rate.
    This leaves probability of finding 10 or less defective (could be 9 or less given that you said more than 80%), given a defect rate of 10% and a sample size of 50.
    Probability of finding 10 or less defective = 99.052% with a little bit of rounding error.  You do this by calculating the probability of finding exactly 10, 9, 8, …..0 and adding them together.  Like I said, the question was really asking greater than 80% (or 41 good out of 50), so your answer could be 97.552% for finding 9 or more defective.
    Hope this helps
    Unfortunately didn’t have time to recheck the hand math, but I think that’s pretty close.

    0
    #145487

    Brit
    Participant

    Fabio:
    Click on the 90431 link in the message you just posted. At the bottom of Paul’s message, click Post a Reply and ask for the document there. If you don’t, Paul may not know to respond.

    0
    #145486

    Brit
    Participant

    Echoing the responses – 3 days for GB training is fairly limiting.  Ours is 10 – 6hr days plus a project.
    What type of company do you work for?  The group here might provide you some ideas if you cannot get the info from your Define phase efforts (as expressed by HornJM).
    Whomever did the training should have guided you in this, by the way.  I would hesitate to use them again for future training if your colleagues plan on getting certified in the future.

    0
    #145436

    Brit
    Participant

    What about the pigeon-hole?

    0
    #145435

    Brit
    Participant

    Well – that would be a start.  I think you have found one variation problem – the previous process.  I would start there. Work to make the incoming process more consistent to spec, then evaluate the capability of the customer process.  If at that point, you are still having problems, then take the additional data you might need.
    You might also use First Time Yield as a measure in addition to you production rate.  That would certainly confirm a reason why the rates were low.

    0
    #145433

    Brit
    Participant

    Again – I think you either mis-read me or I may not have been clear.  The questions/opportunities with a particular issue should dictate which tools you use – in my opinion.  Pigeon-holing a project into any one tool set is a waste.  One methodology (lean, ss, toc, etc.) is not better than another, the tools simply fit a problem better than others.
    Use what works.

    0
    #145431

    Brit
    Participant

    A good point about correlation and causation.  For example, yo umight take data concerinng washing your car and it raining the next day. You might have a good correlation coefficient, but one really doesn’t cause the other to happen.
    One way I like to check causation is asking the question backwards.
    First hypothesis:  Every time I wash my car, it rains.
    Second confirmation hypothesis:  Every time it rains, I wash my car…
    Obviously, washing your car has no effect on the weather.

    0
    #61175

    Brit
    Participant

    I don’t have the number of hospitals, but know it is quite a few.  The real help with this is not just assessing/testing improvements, it is also to sell change ideas.  They can see the results of the changes you want to make in any flow situation.  Regardless of the software, I would recommend it, as long as it has a visual component to it. 

    0
    #145282

    Brit
    Participant

    Once you have determined there is significant variation – as is apparent – one way to start your investigation is by the thought of ‘process best’. By looking at the plot, you can determine when your process worked the best over a period of time.  Trying to determine why that happened is the goal (as long as that time meets or exceeds your customer expectation).
    The plot does bother me a bit – are you sure these are comparitive parts/same parts and process.  Looks a little up and down to me – just wondering.

    0
Viewing 100 posts - 1 through 100 (of 477 total)