iSixSigma

Donna

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Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #188904

    Donna
    Participant

    In the project management world we call it the project pipeline or project portfolio.  I’ve been thinking about the possibility of applying Kan-Ban to the project pipeline.  Has anyone taken this approach?  I’d be interested in results and approach.

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    #177111

    Donna
    Participant

    Does anyone have this template in 2003 version or could someone save it as 2003 version and post?  Thanks.

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    #60942

    Donna
    Participant

    I am one of 4 Black Belts at St. John’s Mercy Health Care in St. Louis, MO.  We have a large suburban and smaller rural hospital with 1,166 total beds and 8037 coworkers.  We began our deployment about 11/2 years ago.   We are just beginning to train green belts and will move forward with a LEAN iniatitive soon.

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    #60565

    Donna
    Participant

    How do you plan to use this benchmark information.  As you have found this is not a typical benchmark for the operating room.  There are probably a couple of reasons for that. 
    1. The first use of the information ‘close – to – incision’ would appear to be a measurement of surgeon productivity or surgeon downtime.  And while there is always concern over room turnover surgeons have not historically been interested in looking at their own opportunities for reducing downtime.
    2. The measure is a looser indication of what is happening in the room  and to the patient than ‘wheels out – to – wheels in’.  A benchmark that includes time the patient is still in the room, time there is no patient in the room, and then more time a patient is in the room can be very controversial when trying to speak to it or sell it. 
    You may want to consider whether this benchmark has any real value for your project.

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    #113049

    Donna
    Participant

    I have been following this thread & all the different interpretations of OTD.  If our customers request certain dates, then this is the calculated date.  But most have a contract on file w/the company that the system uses to caulate delivery time.  Most (not all) have it set up to ship w/i 48 hrs of receiving the order w/2 days transit time.  We calculate our OT by getting it out in the 48 hrs, but monitor whether we can ship in 12 or 24.  Then our carriers are responsible for the intransit time and must provide reports.  Fullfillment of the order is a separate metric as it affects a different part of the logicts train.  In all we use 6 items to monitor our customer service/satisfaction. 

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    #88358

    Donna
    Participant

    Thank you all for your valuable comments.  My presentation was last week, and what we have decided is that this is too big to “bite the entire” apple. What I think my serve our purpose best is to take the process piece that is most painful, and concentrate on that one. Once we’ve done  that we can make some improvements. One of the areas that seems to create the most pain, is “feedback from managers, and scheduling and rescheduling” of interviews, and as you all have said, we run the risk of loosing the best candidates.
    We are looking at panel interviews, and potentially automating the “feedback process for the managers.  If we can reduce our time to fill by I believe anywhere from 7 up to 15 days we will have accomplished a huge part of the goal.
    Hiring more recruiters is not the answer.  We have plenty of recruiters, and in a down market, would be a difficult thing to convince the leaders of such an activity. 
    Again, thank you all  – and we are moving into the analyze phase now.
    Donna

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    #88133

    Donna
    Participant

    One of the first things that you should implement is that your Leadership Team embrace the Six Sigma initiative and roll it out, with a pilot Green Belt training, having those that should attend be the “high potential” employees who in succession planning will be tomorrow’s leaders.  It’s crucial that management at the highest level roll it out, and incent the participants rather than themselves.  I was identified by managers to be in our Green Belt pilot program and we were identified as “high potentials” and just that is incentive as far as motivation goes.  The bonus/compensation rewards come through the normal performance and bonus programs that should already exist in an organization.  Good Luck …Donna

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    #88132

    Donna
    Participant

    Richard
    I have done the “cause and effect”, have done the process flow, the beginning of my FMEA, my discriptive analysis with the P.Value, and the data shows as Normal.  I have done the normality test, and a pareto.  The criteria that show as most critical:
    Manual requisition process,
    Feedback from Manager about the candidate
    Scheduling and rescheduling of the 4/5 interviews with the hiring manager.
    I’ve just completed my second week of green belt training, and we had to present to our leadership team, our Project definitions, voice of the customer, all of our charts/graphs and cost of poor quality.  Most of my costs were TBD.  I have a test that I’m taking this weekend, I have to turn it in on monday, mostly Minitab problems regarding T/Tests, F Tests, Weibull stuff, normal, non normal.  I’m pretty confused at present, but think I will be OK.  I certainly wish I had had some statistic courses under my belt, so I have to try a little harder to pay attention to the PValue and the statement of risk….that’s been my confusion too.  thanks again.
    Donna

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    #88082

    Donna
    Participant

    Richard
    Thank you for your post.  I am struggling through this training, and it’s intense with the Minitab product.  One of my problems will be which tools to use with what data….I have done the initial stuff the Measure Phase, and have all that done with Capability ANalysis, the Normality TEsts, the XY Matrix, Voice of the Customer…etc.  It’s the anlayze phase that will be the “killer”.  Again, appreciate the thoughts.
    donna

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    #87247

    Donna
    Participant

    Hello Ron,
    I would very much like a copy of your power point presentation. I’m currently struggling with project selection for the Green Belt Certification and have been rejected 4x to date.  My first project was turnover, then “time to fill” then training -missed opportunities.  I was told by the Qualtec facilitator that my projects were not aggressive enough or meaty enough.  I’m frustrated and to the point of “dropping out” although I was so energized and motivated at the start thinking I was participating in a very special training.  Thanks Ron.
    donna

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    #87203

    Donna
    Participant

    Ryan
    Thank you for the information.  My issue is that in order to be certified my project must result in at least $30-40K savings, and have improved or reduced something by at least 50%.  I initially looked at our area of highest turnover, the dollars would have been there (about $92K) however the reduction in turnover would have only been about 17%.  Then I looked at “time to fill open positions” and our time to fill is about 60 days exempt and industry standard is about 45, so again not 50%.  Three projects have already been rejected that I have suggested, and I’m alredy two weeks behind the rest of the class.  And, they all are in transactional environments which increase your success in project selection.  THanks again – and I’ll keep doing reseach.
    donna

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    #87199

    Donna
    Participant

    I too am currently enrolled in Green Belt training and have yet to come up with a viable HR project.  Is there a list of projects I could view that have been successful in the HR function?  Thank you for any help.

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    #59864

    Donna
    Participant

    There are a couple of ways to start breaking it down.  You can segment it by  (1.) 3rd party payor  (2.) age (3.) type of rejection: demographic data, payor information,  procedure coding, no response (usually private pay). 
    Once you’ve segmented then you will still need to look at the type of rejection to get to a measurable error. Demographic and payor data is usually obtained in the registration process. Identify the types of errors (mispelled names, wrong addresses, wrong payor, workmen’s comp carrier not identified, referring MD, etc).  Coding comes out of the clinical representation of the procedure by MD and Tech. The coding process carries its own set of missing or mis-entered information (delays in billing often come from the coder having to search for the data).  The oldest accounts (age) can give you an indication of not only the record errors that lead to rejection but the errors in the billing/rebilling process that lead to ageing of a bill.  
    I would take a sample of the rejections to determine where I thought the errors with the most impact on  revenue occurred.  Then test my assumptions against the total sample.  This assumes you can do it electronically.  If it is a manual process – I would definitely do a quick sample and then move to the looking at whether I can apply what I have learned to the present processes so as to short circuit the backlog of unpaid accounts.
     

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    #79043

    Donna
    Participant

    Mark,We are a government contractor and are below the industry average (8.5% vs. 12%); however, an employee satisfaction survey indicated employees believed we had a retention problem. To determine issues, we used a variety of methods to evaluate turnover impact to our business. We looked at turnover by years of service, by job classification, and by department. When there was a high turnover in a specific department, job classification, or among a specfic length of service, we did an FMEA.Hope this is helpful.

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Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)