iSixSigma

Mike in STL

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  • #162518

    Mike in STL
    Participant

    Hello Amy –
    I don’t know what you mean by a small company. I work for a $100MM company which does not have a six sigma culture and who hired me two years ago as a quality technician when they really needed a continuous improvement / Black Belt but didn’t want to pay for one. If your company is similar to mine, most of what has been suggested here might be way beyond what your superiors will want to deal with. That being said I’ve driven a 63% reduction in warranty expense more or less on my own without benefit of any of the things I learned in Black Belt training. I would offer this little piece of advice since you know about Black Belt work (as I have now become certified):
     
    1)      Find out what needs fixed. This is the upper management buy in that everyone talks about. Get it in writing what the low hanging fruit is around this company. You might not get a ‘charter’ from you director but you might get something like ‘the chicken pot pie line always has more scrap than the other lines’ or ‘most of our complaints come from west of the Rockies. What’s wrong with those people out there?’
     
    2)      Find out what inputs affect the process(s) that needs fixed.
     
    3)      Find out what data is available concerning those inputs and where you have to go to get more data (especially watching people on a production line).
     
    4)      Start measuring something with respect to those inputs. Trust your intuition some here but act based on the data.
     
    5)      Start enamoring yourself to the inputs to that process. You’ll affect no change without their help.
     
    6)      Change something.
     
    7)      Communicate, communicate, then communicate some more. Start posting current state and the improving state as it goes along.
     
    I have no idea if this is what you are faced but it has worked for me in this, my fourth company who wanted ‘continuous improvement’ but who knew little about what you have to do to make it.
     
    MikeinSTL
     

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    #158031

    Mike in STL
    Participant

    You might want to look upstream somewhat from the brakes; I, too, continue to work with high scrap and rework from sheet metal defects. What I found out in my initial investigation is the material was coming in with some minor variation but our shear operation was introducing up to .016″ variation. Since our fabrication prints only allow for .015″ after forming, we were strangling the brake operators because we had used up all the tolerance with the first step in the process! It’s better now . . .
    BTW, I don’t work in a SPC-friendly environment although I use control charts in a couple of sub assembly areas for my own protection. We have a lot of short runs to make and a whisker chart or box and whisker would be what I’d use since we have a lot of variation along a single bend or finished dimension. Old, worn out pumps and presses!
    Good luck –

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