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SSNewby

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  • #61444

    SSNewby
    Member

    SS:  Thank you for your suggestions.  Initially I will not be using any software as this is more of a training type of an event.  As I wrote to another poster, I will be presented with case studies that I have never seen and will be asked to present it based on the tools that I’ve learned through GB training.  I guess that is what makes me a little nervous….this will be my first time truly applying what I have learned and I just want to prepare myself in advance and make sure that no matter what topic I am presented with that I approach it in the right matter. 
    Also with regards to software, our team does not currently have any that they are using.  I have used Minitab in the past with another team and thought that that might be the most proficient for them.  Any other suggestions?  Thanks again for all of your input.  It has been invaluable.
     
    SSNewby

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    #61443

    SSNewby
    Member

    Initially my audience will be BB’s who are helping me to assess my skillset and level.  The purpose of the presentation is for practice purposes initially so that when presented with true case studies I will have already had some practice.  So initially the level of detail won’t be great as they are not expecting me to know a great deal about the case studies presented, but rather my ability to tackle any given case study and apply what I have already learned through GB training.
     
    SSNewby

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    #61428

    SSNewby
    Member

    I’m actually looking into health care related case studies, but not a specific one just yet.  What I’m trying to do is prepare myself for some upcoming projects.  I want to figure out the best way to approach a case study when given to me.  You are saying systematically…….so would I just use the DMAIC process and list something next to each category and go from there?  Or should I start off with SIPOC?  I have a lot of learned information, and I’m trying to figure out the best way in which to apply it.  If necessary, I can find a case study here on this site and we can use that as an example to go off of.  I would appreciate ANY and all help!  Thank you so much!
    SSNewby

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    #101401

    SSNewby
    Member

    arjun
    I think that what’s being said is that you need to let your passion drive you for your dissertation research.  It’s a long lonely road and you need to march to your own drum.  It’s fine to ask for input and thoughts, but you need to have a good idea of your topic and how you want to get there pretty early in the game.  You are not led in the research, like I said, follow your passion.  You have to make it exciting and meaningful to you.   Many folks wind up ABD because they did not get obsessive and personal about it and dig deep.  In fact, the only good thing about the years expended is that you discover something for yourself and about yourself.   Good luck and best wishes. 
    SSNewby

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    #101282

    SSNewby
    Member

    I am assuming that you refer to surface mount technology when you say SMT, and I agree with your previous two posters.   Your calculations are the same regardless of the technology at play, and the IPC standards – probably IPC 610 (E – I think it is now) give you the defect types impacting both internal and external acceptance of your process/product.  You will/can get into an endless circular debate regarding defects on your surface mounted chip, is it one lead solder defective out of many on a chip at issue or is it a process defect to have one on the board/final assembly – the main thing is to assure criteria selection consistency between the numerator and denominator for your calculation, make it meaningful and stick with it.  Benchmark within your industry.  If you need more detail, please ask – I had some fun years in aerospace engineering and operations prior to medical products.   Good luck.

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    #101205

    SSNewby
    Member

    E Pluribus Unum, MMAN.

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    #101196

    SSNewby
    Member

    John B.,
     
    Thanks for pointing that out.  I appreciate it, and I had not realized that I had done that.   It must be insecurity on my part.   But, of course, you make a good point regarding the formality in some regions of the world.  I’m from Texas, so that could be part of it.   Regardless, I shan’t post like that again.   I agree it belies my contention of being a humble person.
     SSNewby

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    #101193

    SSNewby
    Member

    Dr. Raymond might or might not respond to your innocent question, so let me offer up an innocent response.    I also think that it’s pretentious and pompous to append PhD or Dr each time you sign your name.   It irritates readers and convinces them, rightly or wrongly, that you are consumed with your own self-importance.  
     
    That’s why, out of respect for others, not wanting to send the wrong message, and my own naturally humble personality, I only append it to my name about ½ of the time.  Besides, it’s easy enough to work it into conversations and/or the body of written text when you opt to leave it off your signature. 
     But, nonetheless, I am in total agreement with you, no more elitist and separatist differentiators, of any sort, should be introduced into, or tolerated by, this forum community.   Sign me up as your thoughtful, agreeing and compliant colleague.

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    #101191

    SSNewby
    Member

    Strategic and analytical above the norm fits.
    Good point.   Dramatic change, both positive and negative change, rarely comes from the happy and content.

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    #101182

    SSNewby
    Member

    I agree with Al.   You have a process issue, analyze and solve it using your Six Sigma tools.   You are the voice of the customer and you have a methodical approach at hand to address your concerns.    Management with facts and data versus gut feel and emotion – that’s what it’s all about.   The really bad thing about your situation is failure to address it in a productive manner creates negative opinions of Six Sigma practitioners when you could, by being more organizationally introspective, look for and correct the dysfunctional factors.    More amature psycho-babble, but it appears that your organizational issues run deeper than just inefficient Black Belts.      

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    #101175

    SSNewby
    Member

    No, Mike.  There you go again.   You launch into these personal attacks everytime Stan’s a wise guy.   He’s not going to change and, it seems, neither are you.    You are every bit as annoying as he is.    In my opinion, you ought to just let it go.    Learn from his good thoughts and experience – and there is a lot there, and ignore the rest.

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    #101160

    SSNewby
    Member

    Dr. Monaco,
    What is modern TQM?   I did not know that there was an evolved TQM.  Do you mean that it now has process and an infrastructure beyond the conceptual that provides for systematic process oriented action(s)?   I was comfortable thinking of TQM as a well-intentioned amorphous blob of good ideas.   Who is the recognized thought leader and what has been published?   Your posting was more than a little obtuse.
    SSNewby

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    #101154

    SSNewby
    Member

    Big Dan,
    What field or business sector were the Black Belts in?   I also find it odd that analytical was not higher on the list.    The BB’s in medical devices (at least in my corporation) are highly analytical engineers and scientists – for the most part.

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    #101153

    SSNewby
    Member

    Not an Odd Ball at all,
     Well stated and thought provoking, but what of innovations spawned by ideas?  As I assume most are.  Can you really separate them so?   

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    #101144

    SSNewby
    Member

    Praveen, this is not meant as picking at you or your formula, it is just an odd bit of academic trivia offered for information purposes only.   
     
    You said that there is no degree after PhD and normally I tend to agree with that perspective.   But, when I got an opportunity to lecture at a UK university on a Fulbright some years ago the academic pecking order was patiently explained to me on day one and I was told that, as a PhD, I had a lower doctorate and as a visiting scholar to bear in mind the emeritus and senior status of some of the university’s academicians.   Asking what the higher doctorates were, I was given this list:
     

    D.Litt.
    D.Sc.
    D.Univ.
    LL.D.
     Asking who held emeritus and senior status, I was told just about everyone but me.   So, as you know, limiting factors are themselves not universal – they are as you find and accept them, or not.

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    #101080

    SSNewby
    Member

    mman,
    There was more wiseacre than wise advice, I’m afraid.  But, regarding start-point, I just meant it is a good point to start getting relevant information about MBNQA.   From the horse’s (NIST) mouth.  Then start getting the thoughts and opinions of others.   I enjoyed my Baldrige work and felt/feel that it contributed to our nation’s understanding and application of quality principles.   It really is, to me anyway, a good thing to do – it is service to your country and its people.  Sounds funny, I know, but it is volunteer work and it makes a difference.  It is possible to do it for many years and I will do it again in the future, but I don’t have time at this point.   By an active candidate I don’t know if you mean an award candidate or an examiner candidate.   If it’s award candidate – the criteria is amply described on the NIST web site.  If it’s examiner candidate – the criteria is less specific, but mostly a demonstrated and sustained knowledge of the quality field.  However, I certainly met a lot of fellow examiners who had very diverse backgrounds.  If you are interested in finding out more, there is a list of current Baldrige examiners on the NIST web site, along with their contact information.
    SSNewby 

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    #101076

    SSNewby
    Member

    mman,
    Go to the NIST web site @ http://www.quality.nist.gov/
    It tells you a great deal about the award.   As an ex-Baldrige examiner – it’s your best starting point.   Also, if you are really interested in arcane Motorola folklore you have come to the right forum.  It abounds here, if you can handle the who-did-what-to-whom-when riots the postings start.
    SSNewby

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    #101062

    SSNewby
    Member

    Chance or dumb luck factored in with a fuzz factor?  Oh, you must mean that 1.5 sigma shift thingy…    When I politely asked earlier what in your formula was beyond the obvious you gave me an obscure reference to common sense not being common and the obvious being oblivious – so I conclude the answer is, “nothing, it is what it is.”  Which is OK.    At least you didn’t call me Grasshopper… 

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    #101033

    SSNewby
    Member

    So?  
    His/her saying, “The organization needs excellence in process management and very well motivated employees to ensure that there is excellence in implementation throughout the organization.” provides little actual insight or impact.  
    What’s your point?

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    #100943

    SSNewby
    Member

    Praveen,
     
    This seems like a desire on your part to frame a simple intuitive concept into a product development or innovation paradigm.    You are saying that innovation is a derivative of hard work, knowing your topic, trying different approaches, and using your imagination.  I believe those were the rather obvious life lessons that my parents told me when I was a kid.    What am I missing?  (Other than, I suppose, personal demonstration of successful application.)  Thanks.
     SSNewby

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    #100919

    SSNewby
    Member

    mman,
    I dunno about all of that.    Alive and informative – certainly.   Sarcastic – yep.  Attractive? – that’s a bit of a stretch.
    SSNewby

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    #100904

    SSNewby
    Member

    At last, something in this thread that I agree with.   Good observation and well expressed.   Thanks.

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    #100710

    SSNewby
    Member

    Darth,
     
    Although it was a rhetorical statement to try to prove an elusive point, I’d like to answer that it can occasionally (and I don’t have data – sorry) be difficult to lookup an answer in a book and post it.  At least with the predicate assumptions/requirements in place that:  1.) the question was clearly stated    2.) the reader/respondent understood the question  and 3.) the reader/respondent had the wherewithal to find and effectively communicate the answer not only to the satisfaction of the original questioner but also to the many forum readers who want an answer to the question.  
     
    And, again (sorry), I don’t have data, but my gut feel is 40% +/- 5% of the questions in the forum have either already been explicitly asked and answered or are deducible from information in the isixsigma.com web site.  
     
    But, as I said, I have no data and refuse to try to perform obtuse calculations because some weenie insulted you.    At least I don’t have time to right now, maybe later.
     SSNewby 

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    #100580

    SSNewby
    Member

    Well, now… wait just a minute.  I thought that what he said and how he said it was germane and integral to the posting’s thread.  I was actually beginning to think of him as a Six Sigma tool.    Credit where credit’s due.

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    #100574

    SSNewby
    Member

    You go Feverguy!!  Way to tell him off!!! 
     
    As an fyi – you can initially write your posting in Microsoft Word, use spell check, and then copy and paste it into your isixsigma.com posting field.   A thesaurus is also available.  Unless, of course, your goal was to appear feverish and raving, and, if so, you did well.   In fact, I’ll bet that rascal Darth won’t be posting anymore wiseacre comments – just those boring technical Six Sigma insights that he seems to continuously offer up with little provocation.   What a pain!!
     Yep, we’ll just see if there are anymore wiseacre comments out of him!!!  I’ll bet you put a stop to it once and for all.

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    #100300

    SSNewby
    Member

     Well stated.  I agree and suggest that your thoughts be taken in the considerate and respectful manner in which they were offered versus being picked at and debated.  Let’s move on.  We Six Sigmatites [however long our respective involvements have been] have many real hills to climb and we should climb them together. 

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    #100294

    SSNewby
    Member

    Gabriel,
     
    I hope that you don’t mind if the rest of us do consider you a very effective and helpful Six Sigma professional.   Don’t waste your time yelling into the wind on this.  The wind is what it is and little more.
     SSNewby

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    #100242

    SSNewby
    Member

    This thread remains somewhat compelling – much like not really wanting to look at a train wreck but not quite being able to turn away from it.  
     
    As much as I love good theoretical and ideological debates [and I normally do] this argument lacks the grounding provided by significance and relevance.   You and Stan have each selected a different perspective to perch on and will never join each other on the same perch.
     
    Who said Six Sigma first?  Who said Black Belt first?   Is there validity to the 1.5 sigma shift?   What a waste of your time.
     You are both really bright knowledgeable guys (and possibly Dr. Harry also) and you could be conceptualizing and leading the next advance in Six Sigma but you’d rather see if you can pee on each other from your perch.    Just a comment from the pee-nut gallery.

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    #99961

    SSNewby
    Member

    Agreed.  Stan and Statman are well equipped for the debate.   That’s the primary reason I did not respond further to Mr. Reigle’s condescending note back to me telling me to do my homework.  Besides, with Mr. Reigle, all roads lead back to the good doctor anyway – which is also somewhat annoying after awhile.

     

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    #99886

    SSNewby
    Member

    Stan,
     
    It seems to me that this is being positioned away from the strength of your argument which is/was the appropriateness, applicability and validity of the use of a 1.5 sigma shift in operations and positioned in the direction of a theoretical back-calculation of the impact of the shift – if the shift has occurred.  Is the question one of mathematical feasibility or appropriateness in real-world application?   I am concerned that the challenge [whichever way it goes] will not answer the real question.
     SSNewby

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    #99578

    SSNewby
    Member

    Mike,
     
    And your emotional rant, describing the insufficiency of data derived by using 360’s, is supported by data?    For a person who is typically very calm, logical and fact-based in his postings, you have really gone nuts on this topic.    By the way, you are sooooo sensitive.  I was joking about the abstract world of consultants and academicians – I plan to be there myself someday. 
     SSNewby

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    #99495

    SSNewby
    Member

    What a nice abstract little world you consultants and academicians live in.  360’s are a tool, a single tool, in an effective manager’s toolkit.  You have to know when, how, and why to use them.  They can’t take the place of knowing the business, the organizational imperatives, and the strengths and weaknesses of your people.   They can, and should, be used in conjunction with other performance excellence tools, e.g., structured and integrated goals, developmental plans, and performance appraisals.   Where I see the benefit of using 360’s is not in telling you something about your employee, it is in telling the employee something about him/herself.   Frequently people no matter how clear and direct you try to be with them just don’t see themselves as others do.  That is, in my humble opinion, the almost singular benefit of using 360’s – the resultant epiphany.  

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    #99453

    SSNewby
    Member

    Mark,
     
    I have read your several postings, each of which direct the reader to your consulting web site, and I need to tell you that is not allowed in the isixsigma.com forum.    Contribute, but don’t advertise.  
     SSNewby

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    #99273

    SSNewby
    Member

    No….. “Omnia mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis.” just means “All things are changing, and we are changing with them.”   Sort of an acknowledgement of the fact that we live and work in a dynamic state.
    But, I did like the “butt bubbles” analogy, if only for it’s graphic imagery.  But then again, I also liked “Porkey’s” and all of the “Police Academy” movies, so maybe I’m not the best judge of culture.   Aspice, credo nos in fluctu eodem esse.

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    #99266

    SSNewby
    Member

    You joke with “Exalted Senior Dr. Master Black Belt” but it’s already on my CV.  I really did like it.   Omnia mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis.

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    #99263

    SSNewby
    Member

    Rog,
    I agree with needing to address the question that you asked.  We keep getting lost in the past.   The question is not who started Six Sigma and what did they do back then, it’s who is doing it now and who is setting new standards of excellence – and how are they doing it.   (Ask that in a few years, and I’ll drop this nom de plum B.S. and tell you who’s in the game.)   But, out of the folks that are currently working in or running Six Sigma programs who is top of the heap and why, and did they accomplish it with existing leadership in place or by bringing in Six Sigma experienced leaders, e.g., ex-Allied Signal, ex-Motorola, ex-GE, etc.?  And, possibly more important, is bringing in these “experts” keeping the state of the art in Six Sigma stagnant?
    SSNewby

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    #99139

    SSNewby
    Member

    I think it is fair to think of the question as having been asked and answered.

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    #98986

    SSNewby
    Member

    AT,
     
    Best wishes with your studies.   Anytime you can intertwine academic research and studies with practical interests and applied elements of your work or environment the more rewarding it is.   This web site is one of the best for well-written articles, interpersonal connections, and forum responses and thoughts from practitioners that I have seen.
     
    SSNewby

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    #98983

    SSNewby
    Member

    Dear QW,
    Whoa…. slow down a little.   You are sooooo sensitive.   I was not trying to suggest that you had said or done anything questionable or wrong.    I was saying that you can’t be successful with something like Six Sigma doing it half way.    As a fellow degreed engineer (but, granted, one that also has an MBA and a PhD in operations research – possibly making me little too esoteric at times), I think that I am also pragmatic and data driven.    But I am also driven make large changes to a large organization and to do it successfully and quickly.   As a result, I chose to be a zealot.  I have to be a zealot.  So, I am and will be a zealot.  However, it is not (exactly) blindly following the path, it has been more evaluating, seeking training, developing competency, and then committing to the path.  And, for my organization, a fortune 500 company, I get to lead us down this path and also determine other future intersecting paths.  It is a tremendous experience, one not without risk from both personal and organizational standpoints, but one that I am certain will have many positive returns.
    Question fundamental beliefs, but when the organizational train leaves the station, it’s best to be on it.  And if you get the chance to help lay the tracks, select the engines, make the schedules, start the engines, and make the whistle go “Whooo, whooo”, take it.  It beats being someone else’s passenger.
    I don’t know that I’d read and re-read anyone’s responses on the forum looking for insight.  Take it for what it is and move on.  I was serious that you and your co-workers are the only ones that can improve your operation.  Continue to participate in the forum and ask good questions, but don’t drink the Kool-Aid.  Unless, of course, you are in my corporation in which you should not gulp the Kool-Aid, save some for others, there is plenty to go around…
    SSNewby

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    #98968

    SSNewby
    Member

    McD,
    Sounds pretty notable to me.  I appreciate your experience and insights and like the fact that you help add a voice of capable and thoughtful consideration to the forum.  It is too easy, especially in the anonymity of this forum, for folks lacking fundamentals to jump in there and lead people astray.    Keep up the good work.  Thanks.
    SSNewby

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    #98967

    SSNewby
    Member

    Dr. Vader,
     
    I am both tremendously honored and utterly speechless.  Fourth Order was well beyond anything I had ever aspired to achieving.  This day, I have arrived   (or at least become even more of the consummate geek than I already was, which is, in itself, quite an achievement).  
     SSNewby PhD Grand Exalted Senior Master Black Belt of the Fourth Order (newly installed)

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    #98962

    SSNewby
    Member

    AT,
    You were probably being a little snotty there, but, the more I think about it – the better it sounds.  “Dear Sr. Master Black Belt Bramwell”.  I’m not sure how you become a Sr. Master Black Belt, but it has a nice ring to it.   I’m thinking I want to be a Grand Sr. Master Black Belt though, and maybe this forum, and MicroSoft  “Certificates”, is the way to do it.  Thanks.
    SSNewby

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    #98957

    SSNewby
    Member

    Gabriel,
     
    Typically good and on-target questions from you.  
     
    Yes.  I am referring primarily to PVC plastic injection molding.   But, as you said, I don’t believe that impacts your question.  It impacts, obviously, process methodologies, tooling and set-point parameters, but that’s not really what we are discussing.
     
    By “measuring the metal”, I was talking about tool metrology and dimensional approval done against the tooling drawing, done well in advance of the mold/tool arriving at the molding plant.   It is done, as you said, in a non-destructive manner, measuring all tooling print dimensions that can be measured.  Our tooling engineers and metrology folks are very skilled at their jobs and not much gets by them.   Their professionalism and capabilities on the front end of the process give us a very good quality assurance starting point.
     
    In talking about running a “first article on each print dimension measurements on each print dimension”, I am describing the qualification/validation process for a new tool and an existing press, existing tool and new press, or new tool and new press.  Saying multiple shots at this point usually means three shots.   We have quite a few 64-cavity tools, so this is no small task.
     
    For qualified/validated processes (tool/press/process validated) in ongoing production, we measure the critical dimensions of one part from each cavity at start of run.  The measurements are taken using gauges which have an RS232 port connection to the PC used for SPC trending.  So, the measurements are taken once and automatically entered into the SPC program.   During the production run we use go/no-go gauges, pins, etc., to verify that the samples pulled in process are still within acceptance ranges.   But, yes, we perform dimensional measurements on all critical dimensions for one part from each cavity at the beginning of each lot.   If we find that we are out of dimension on a critical dimension at the beginning of a lot, we have to go into the preceding lot and sample very heavily across the proceeding lot trying to determine when it went out of specification – if we can’t make a conservative case as to “when and why”, the preceding lot is also toast.
     
    I should probably have prefaced my comments by saying that we are in the pharmaceutical and medical device business and many of our molded parts are made to as high a precision level as possible.   But, regardless, starting with established tool dimensions, a qualified/validated molding process mating dedicated tool and press, and then using SPC at start of lots saves you many headaches in process.
     SSNewby

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    #98942

    SSNewby
    Member

    Gabriel,
     
    We have several back-integrated plants that mold for our finishing plants and we have seen the best way to maintain demonstration of part-to-part uniformity is to begin with extensive mold/tool approval measuring every appropriate cut metal dimension on the mold/tool as a pre-installation approval and then at process qualification (attachment of tool to press) run a first article on each print dimensioned measurement on each cavity across multiple shots.  The process qualification itself is a DOE in which we determine optimized press temperature, screw speed (correlates to pressure), pack and in-mold residence times.   Once the tool has been inspected for metal cut and placement of gates, and the process has been qualified for the specific press and tool combination, production is turned on to run the parts.    The first production run has a full dimensional check of the part and subsequent runs have the critical dimensions, as identified on the specifications print, checked at start-up and periodically per shift as the lot progresses.
     
    From the point where we are running production on a qualified tool and press combination our critical dimensions checked at start-up and per shift are entered into an SPC program (using ASI DataMyte).   We trend and then respond to trending data as appropriate.   Issues with short shots, hoop stress, etc., resulting from tool wear, plugged cavities, materials dryness, etc., are noted and responded to.   It sounds like you are dealing with a small shop with limited resources and it is possible to separate the responsibilities, such as, your engineering can help with tool and process qualifications and the parts molder can perform basic SPC recording and trending using elementary tools and measurements from critical dimensions taken at appropriate times in the lot’s progression.  You can predetermine the issues and concerns that the parts molder needs to contact you about and/or the types and nature of the responses available for trend variance and excursions.  Frequently, as you and others have pointed out in the past, answers don’t have to be that difficult to derive because the question/problem did not have to be that complicated and convoluted.
     SSNewby

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    #98932

    SSNewby
    Member

    Your input is one that I look forward to reading because it is balanced and thoughtful in addition to being knowledgeable.  Most in this forum are not comfortable identifying themselves.  Since you are, out of curiosity, which John J. McDonough are you?  I know of two notable academicians and at least one notable business executive named John J. McDonough.   
     

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    #98859

    SSNewby
    Member

    I’ll take that as a non-rhetorical question and try to give you my best answer.
    I think that Six Sigma is about organizational transformation, e.g., organizational leadership embracing commitment to continuous improvement and walking the talk, everyone speaking the same language, the allocation and assignment of full time problem solvers with strong statistical and analytical skills, selecting projects to work on based on positive impact to the organization, and creating an energized momentum that keeps the organization moving toward meeting its goals and objectives in a dynamic marketplace. 
     
    Six Sigma to me means positive and lasting change brought about by committed and dedicated change agents.  It is TQM inclusive of the process needed to truly realize the goals and objectives of TQM.
     
    And… if you have to become a zealot to awaken the organization to opportunity, to teach and train the uninformed, and then to lead the organization down the Six Sigma path, make the commitment and do it.   I’m a zealot and, like it or not, most of the folks posting in this forum are zealots – it’s one of the things that I like about it.  One thing that I agreed with Richard Schroeder about in his postings is the acceptance of risk inherent in stepping to the plate and putting your career on the line to do what you believe is best for the organization.   I think it’s safe to say that you and your coworkers are the only ones that can improve your organization and, while you get input from this forum, take it with a grain of salt – I’m reasonably certain it’s meant well, but we are all too distant from the reality of your workplace to give you much truly actionable insight.  
    However, most of us absolutely believe in the power of a well-implemented Six Sigma program.
     

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    #98811

    SSNewby
    Member

    Q Witch,
    Re-read McD’s response to you.   It was well written and clear.  You seem to continue to miss the point.   SS is only as good as its capable practitioners and it appears that you have none in your corporation.    Maybe your questions should revolve around how best to get the expertise versus how best to bypass what little SS expertise you have.
    SSNewby

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    #98762

    SSNewby
    Member

    Darth,
     
    I agree.  It’s a sad commentary.   
     SSNewby

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    #98760

    SSNewby
    Member

    Mike,
     
    Thank you for your thoughts.  My lack of responding to your comments is because I’m reading the TPS stuff as recommended.   I can’t say I’m in conceptual agreement yet, but I’d rather not debate until I read and digest more on the subject.   I do see your point though.
     SSNewby

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    #98668

    SSNewby
    Member

    Mike,
     
    Where do you see disconnect starting with Six Sigma and then melding in Lean?   I’m taking the simplistic approach that variance is addressed with Six Sigma and flow facilitation and optimization is addressed with Lean, and many Lean problems can be solved with Six Sigma analytics.  I’d add to that thought that I believe that most of the operations problems that I have encountered have appeared to have been a result of variance and it would seem a natural progression to start with Six Sigma getting the biggest and most immediate bang for the buck. You have stated in other postings that it is more difficult starting with Six Sigma and then adding Lean versus the other way around.   I don’t doubt that you have basis for your position, but it seems somewhat counterintuitive.   
     SSNewby

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    #98639

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    Quality Witch,
     
    Not worrying about the methodology throws into question the bottom line results that you got or think you got.    An on-target selection and execution of methodology is all that assures that you have optimized your results.    Instead of getting, and acting on, input from this forum after briefly describing your concerns, I’d suggest that you sit down with your MBB and reason through the process and your desired results.
     
    Is there any chance of your getting the input of your MBB and posting that in the forum in addition to your thoughts?  It might provide for a well informed, balanced and appropriate reader response.   
     SSNewby

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    #98392

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    Yep, pretty naive, I guess.   What have you done lately?    Still surfing the same wave?

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    #98388

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    Truly a rubber meets the road question.   Well stated and multi-layered.    Somewhat typical of my plunging in and then considering the ramifications let me think as I go:

     I believe that you’d be a more effective Six Sigma practitioner with formal training
     

    You are about to begin an important project. 
     

    Would you be better off using the Six Sigma DMAIC process than not using it?    If you can properly apply the process, the answer is yes.
     

    Can you properly apply the DMAIC process without formal training?   I believe that you can understand the logical sequencing, the tools, and the use of the tools.
     

    What does the Six Sigma practitioner bring to the table beyond the analytical DMAIC process?   I believe that the Black Belt also possesses facilitative skills in knowing how to scope a project, derive a cost-benefit analysis for the project, sell the project, create and energize a matrix-managed interdisciplinary team, identify the need for and bring in various key subject matter experts at needed times in the project lifecycle, determine those true corrective and preventive actions that preclude problem recurrence, and drive the project to conclusion.
     

    Can you (or anyone) effectively combine these skills, traits and characteristics without formal training?    I don’t know you, your experience, skills sets, track record, or the problem you are facing, so it’s hard to personalize the answer.   To some degree it depends on you, the need for the participation of others in the project, the do-ability of the project, and the organizational resources and imperative(s).   I’d say, being ignorant of the aforementioned, that you’d be more effective with training but a talented and driven person can achieve a great deal.  You already have so there is no reason to assume that you can’t continue in that manner.  
     

    Is there an effective analogy to depict the answer that I’m trying to provide?   Let’s try one.   You are very fit and an experienced hiker and outdoorsman.  You are a skilled indoor wall climber.   In fact you are VERY good at indoor wall climbing.   You research and study EVERYTHING you do.  You always have and always will.   You have a trip planned to Yosemite and you are going to climb the sheer flat face of Half Dome, and you are pumped, yelling “Yeeehaaa!!!!”   You have books on rock climbing and just bought all of the equipment you could possibly need.    Most people are recommending that you take some rock climbing lessons, but you feel that you have the technical skills to accomplish the task and have read books written by the masters.  Are you going to make it?  I hope so. Would you be better off having had some lessons?  I believe so. 
     

    To the question is it a legitimate Six Sigma project?   You answer that.  It is your call.   Are you a legitimate Six Sigma practitioner and did you recognize it as a Six Sigma project?   If your answer to both is yes, it is.  If your answer to either is no, it is not.  You legitimize it, or not.  
     
    That’s about the best I can do with your question.  There are certainly more knowledgeable Six Sigma people here in the forum than I am.  But, if it was me, I’d get some training to assure a better result, but, if the project was important, and for one reason or another training was not available, I’d do the project and I’d use the DMAIC process.  Good luck with your project and your intellectual query.

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    Prof. Tom,
     
    Is your offer to shadow your Lean Six Sigma program open to non-academicians?   One of my corporate responsibilities is to develop and implement a Six Sigma program (in process) and then to, in relatively short order, follow that up with an effective Lean program, and I’d like to see the program approach that you have developed as well as see the input and commentary from your students.    Thanks for considering my question.
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    #98379

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    To more fully answer the question I addressed in my previous posting, ASQ can “Certify” you as a Six Sigma Black Belt.   A PhD in a statistics-related field can/will help you understand some of the more technical elements of, and tools used in, the Six Sigma process, and also helps give you research skills and hopefully an analytical mode of thought.   You are skilled in scientific problem solving and Six Sigma has its roots in scientific problem solving – another plus.
     
    But, you won’t get the knowledge of Six Sigma application that you need to enable you to lead Six Sigma projects or initiatives solely from books, and “Certification” without practicum will certainly (and should) be questioned.  You can certainly get a tremendous jumpstart on the process, but you need some practical training. 
     
    I was where you are not too long ago.  I’m a PhD in a statistics-related field (however, unlike your Epidemiology, it was in the purest and most difficult of the research fields Operations Research, but we can debate that another time), with quite a few years in various Quality/Engineering/Operations positions and really felt that I could understand and apply Six Sigma from the combination of my research into the field and my technical and management knowledge and experience.   My need to understand Six Sigma came from having program responsibility for my corporation, and I decided that it would be a good idea to have done a couple of Six Sigma projects before the program was to be started.   My strong suggestion is get training, capable and well versed training, complete the training, and lead to completion Six Sigma projects.   The knowledge and experience that you gain, your education, AND “Certification” will mean something to anyone.
     
    My thoughts anyway (from having been where you are).
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    #98325

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    Rich and Mike,
     
    It’s a shame that, although you’ve chosen to grace us with your presence in this forum, that you can’t take the time to address some of the questions regarding the genesis of Six Sigma that have been bouncing back and forth.  But you can, evidently make shallow criticism of the forum participants and participate in inside jokes before you explain that you don’t have time for the trivial and flit off.
     
    I had not until now, having only read your well-written books, bought into the criticism heaped in your direction by those in the forum purporting to know you.  It appears that you might actually have been in the right place, at the right time, and parlayed the hard work of many into a reputation of Six Sigma “ownership.” 
     Mirabile visu ad nauseam

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    At the risk of setting off a cacophony of hysterical responses, you can take the ASQ (American Society of Quality) Six Sigma Black Belt Certification exam and, upon passing it, you are “Certified.”
     Many Six Sigma practitioners disdain the ASQ CSSBB because it does not require extensive (expensive) training and completed project work.   You take the exam and, if you are proficient with the ASQ Six Sigma body of knowledge, you are certified (after paying a very nominal fee of a couple of hundred dollars).

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    #98160

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    Wow!  That’s great.   I hope I run into you someday.  If I do, prepare for a few hours of questions about Dr. Deming and your interaction with him and perceptions of him.   Undergrad for me was IE, with MBA, and doctorate in operations research and a lot of my career in quality – so there has been much Deming along the way.   It just gets no better than that!!!

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    #98150

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    Having had what I thought to be a very knowledgeable and exacting dissertation committee and having benefited immeasurably from their guidance and input, I am truly in awe of your having had Dr. Deming on your committee, what an incredible and memorable experience that must have been.   That is really neat.   What was that experience like?  
     
     (I trust that you are referring to Dr. W. Edwards Deming versus Dr. Ralph Deming from Some Forgotten U.  I realize how easy it is to fall into a well-constructed sarcasm pit in this forum.)

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    #98141

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    Buying Colorado football would be an interesting thought.   I understand that they have an especially tactful coach – fully embracing diversity and a fun time for players.

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    #98137

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    Actually, Dr. Darth, it’s a little more complicated than that.  The way things have worked out over the years, I’m looking for a good university to buy.   Joy and fulfillment come in many flavors.   Right now I enjoy what I’m doing (life sucking though it may be).

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    #98089

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    Darth,
    Trash away.   I was not clear in what I said.   I do have a PhD, I just did not do a post-doc, and then stay in academia, to my more than occasional regret.  But, the plan is to eventually return to teaching once industry has sucked the life out of me  (and that should not take a whole lot longer). 
    SSNewby

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    #98067

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    Yep.  I agree.   Austin.  6th Street.   Bevo.   Lone Star Beer.    Shiner Bach.   The Oasis.   The County Line.   Lake Travis.  Hippie Hollow.   Threadgill’s.   etc.  etc.  etc…….
     Why else would anyone spend 10 years in college?   And then, I was thaaat close to post-doc, then maybe assistant professor, then maybe associate professor, then maybe professor (as in NEVER EVER leaving).   But, industry called…   (or, rather, massive college loan debts called – frequently)

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    #98050

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    Texas State?   C’mon there…..  As a UT – Austin grad, I’ve got to say something.    It’s NOT “Texas State”, it’s the University of Texas.   I hate to be picky, although we didn’t make the Final Four, we do have some standards.
     Hook’em Horns   (and yes, I’m making the horns hand sign while I try to type)

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    #98040

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    Rog,
     
    I think you are zeroing in on the target, if I could try to adjust the XY coordinates on your scope just a bit (as in elevation and windage), it seems to me that the best Black Belt is a composite of many skills and abilities.  They include project management and leadership in a matrix management environment, process knowledge, statistical application, passion for the job, effective communication, and the drive and enthusiasm to be a good change agent.  All of which combined garners the confidence and respect of the organization, which is needed to effectively do the job as a Black Belt.   Statistics is a needed tool and is essential to Six Sigma analytics, but a trained Black Belt can and will frequently use a rote mechanical application of Minitab, Statgraphics, SPSS, textbooks, etc., to get the job done.   I have noticed that some of the best statisticians were the least effective Black Belts if they did not have the other skills.
     
    When I look at my bookcase I see many textbooks on industrial engineering and operations research – the reason I keep the textbooks is for reference.  Could I readily answer detailed questions about a Markov analysis?   Probably not.  Would I know when it’s appropriate to use one and how to quickly come up to speed to perform one correctly?  Yes.  
     
    My point is, it’s better (agreeing with Rog) to have a multidimensional means of assessing a Black Belt’s overall ability and capacity to be an organizational fit than simply using a one-dimensional set of statistical questions for assessment of competency.
     
    My lunchtime 2 cents worth. 
     SSNewby

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    #97900

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    That was an interesting response to my comments regarding your posting.  
     
    Mike Carnell did a good job addressing your thoughts regarding a correlation existing between sarcastic comments expressed in a technical forum with the damage done by the porn industry and also with your equating Stan’s comments with spam, so I’ll leave that alone.  It sounded a little goofy, but if that’s what you think, I can’t change it and don’t know that I’d want to if I could.  Those are your beliefs to hold.
     
    As to why I like to read postings in this forum and occasionally feel compelled to respond, like anyone else with Six Sigma interest and responsibility, I try to gain as much application insight as possible.   It’s been my good fortune to be able to “sell” my corporation on Six Sigma, but with that came the added responsibility of bringing it in and making it work   I had/have a great deal to learn and believe that I have found a very good information source in isixsigma.  I’ve been able to hook up with many thought leaders in the field because of articles, advertisements, and comments in isixsigma, bringing quite a few of them into the corporation for various consultations.  In an attempt to effectively develop and apply the program, I took Six Sigma training at the Black Belt level from one of the better providers and worked on a couple of projects during my training.   But, as you well know, that’s not the same as having done years of Six Sigma projects at the Black Belt level and understanding the nuances of making it work. I like getting the thoughts and hearing the experiences of people who have been there and done it.  With Six Sigma programs spreading from corporation to corporation like they have, I’ll bet you’d be surprised at the folks that are starting to pay attention to your “techie” forum.   Too many managers over the years have in effect abdicated their management responsibility to IT professionals because they don’t understand the jargon and the technology, and that can’t happen with a somewhat more amorphous concept like Six Sigma and expect it to be successful.
     In my note to you I suggested that you get in there and show Stan what an ill-informed and misleading curmudgeon he is.   I notice, although that was the main thought expressed in your initial posting, you still stayed away from engaging him on a technical level.  Why is that?   

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    #97892

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    What are you proposing?   A nice neat little socially acceptable forum in which we offer technically sound advice and opinions and stay away from expressions of personality or emotion?  Like it or not, the way you say something communicates as much as the thought being expressed.   If an expert tells me something and says it in an exasperated manner, more thought has been conveyed than the technical answer.   I might not like it and the expert might take that tact too often, and if that’s the case I stop listening.   That is his/her prerogative, and mine also.
     
    If Stan’s advice is the problem and, as you said in your post, he is ill informed and incorrect in his Six Sigma/statistical/analytical input, challenge that.
     
    As I said in a previous post, step to the plate and call him out.  If he is wrong and misleading readers, challenge him.  Otherwise picking at his personality is non-value added.  
     And when you say “the contempt he holds for those with distinguished credentials”?….. geeze, it comes across that you have a serious ego issue here…. as a PhD myself with years of senior management experience, my thought about getting challenged by anyone on anything is “so what?”  Let’s discuss it and if you are right and I’m wrong, I learned something and I’m better off for it.  You are what you are and are what you contribute, and nothing more.  I don’t care where you went to school, what degrees you hold, and what you have done in your career – what are you doing now?   Are you contributing or not?  That’s all that matters.  I think that Stan and many others here contribute to the understanding of the Six Sigma body of knowledge, snotty and disrespectful posts or not.   If anyone is offensive, don’t read his/her posting.   Like with Howard Stern – you don’t need FCC intervention and penalties, just don’t watch him and he’ll implode. 

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    #97877

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    Douglas,
    Lighten up.  Don’t take it personally.  It’s a group of people with common interests (albeit using assumed names and caustic wit) expressing themselves with humor and giving their own opinions as they are giving you the information that you asked for.   There are quite a few axes being ground and flailed here, e.g., CSSBB exams, research, etc.   Your question just gave opportunity for some opinions to fly.
    Good luck on your CSSBB exam.
    SSNewby

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    #97876

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    Hmmm…
    Jben,
    As hesitant as I am to wade into this thread, please allow me, a fellow PhD, to comment.  I find that I learn a lot from Stan, Mike, Dr. Steve, Darth, and others who try (even with a blasting humor at times) to actually give Six Sigma insights.   I find myself ignoring comment tone and pokes at each other when it’s given in the context of offering an opinion or information about Six Sigma and business processes in general.  
    Your comment, however, was deviod of insight and without contribution.   You don’t have to like Stan.  I can’t say that I do either, but, if you take exception to what he says about Six Sigma, challenge him on his knowledge and understanding of the subject.  I don’t see a lot of that going on, just smacking him about his sarcastic delivery.
    Jben – step to the plate and show Stan that he is lacking subect matter knowledge.   We (I am anyway) are waiting for a good intellectual and Six Sigma praxis-based exchange. Otherwise, maybe there is a more suitable forum for you.
    SSNewby

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    #97872

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    When we started our Six Sigma program we wasted many days debating calculating sigma levels (how, when, where, why) for processes, products, plants, etc., and finally came to the conclusion that we already had the metrics that were significant for determining where we had major opportunities for improvement.   We needed to get to work prioritizing and assigning projects for our Six Sigma experts to work on and making the needed improvements versus getting caught up in what amounts to a largely academic exercise in sigma calculations.
    It’s fun (for awhile) to calculate a sigma levels and run around with a metric that no one else has, and which is presumed to give meaningful comparative insights into a company’s efficiency, quality, and (somehow) ethics, but you quickly come to understand that it’s only through identifying and correcting your problems that you are getting any benefit from Six Sigma.  That’s where the rubber meets the road, not from the window dressing sigma calculations.    

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    #97871

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    My company’s approach has been to require senior leadership to attend Six Sigma leadership training, program champions to attend champion training, and the Black Belts and Green Belts to complete their respective training.  The leaders are the various VP’s and Sr. VP’s and the champions are the plant managers and directors reporting into the VP’s.    The champions are the Six Sigma project sponsors and the Black Belts and Green Belts in the plants report directly to the plant managers, or to a senior plant staff member at the larger plants, and report dotted line into the corporate Six Sigma program office/Master Black Belt.   The performance goals, achievement of which, assure bonus, promotion, and retention, are integrated at all levels and functions.  The goals speak to assuring a viable Six Sigma program with training and HC allocation numbers, project numbers, dollar savings, and other significant metrics.   We initiated Six Sigma in Operations first and are moving the program throughout the corporation.
     
    We are committed and linked together in our Six Sigma venture.   That is not to say that there are not Six Sigma doubters or even passive aggressive employees that would calmly watch the program fall on its duff, but commitment from the top, organizational and goals linkage, and senior management walking-the-talk is keeping the program both visible and an exciting challenge. 
     
    As many have said in this forum before, organizational learning and commitment is essential and Six Sigma needs to move from being “a program” to being “the way we do business.”  Like GE, we will inculcate Six Sigma into our organizational DNA.  

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    #97413

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    David,
     
    While somewhat self-promoting, your response was professional and to the point.   I liked your “step to the plate and identify yourself if you have a problem” approach.   I would not expect you to identify the caller, but if you would respond with another posting to let us know whether or not your protagonist had the guts to call and state his/her case, I think the rest of us would like to factor that in when we are reading future adamant postings.
     SSNewby

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    #97403

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    Yep.   Don’t get so hung up on structuring an intriguing multivariate analysis, tweaking input factors, and assessing the impact to the system that you lose track of the fact that your issue is more than likely identifying sources of process variance and eliminating them.   A lesson learned…

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    #97390

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    DICOB  =  Define, Investigate, Conceptualize, Optimize, Build

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    #97304

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    I agree fully with your thoughts.  Our path was to train executive Leadership, Champions, and then Green Belts and Black Belts concurrently.     This gave the senior management team the capacity to talk the talk and begin the process of walking the talk.   
    The one week training for the Green Belts and the five month + training for the Black Belts obviously had Green Belts completing their training first, and, while this was initially some cause for concern, it gave the Green Belts the opportunity to work alongside the Black Belts as they worked on their initial in-training projects.   I think this gave us stronger Green Belts and Black Belts who were appreciative of the help.   Every company is going to start-up their Six Sigma programs differently, but we began at the corporate level and then rolled it out to each of sixteen plants at the same time.  Each plant’s roll out involved several Green Belts (working part time on Six Sigma projects) and several Black Belts (working full time on Six Sigma projects) and then began gradual plant-to-plant expansion beyond that.   
    So far, with some growing pains here and there, it’s been successful – success measured in terms of energy, buy-in, and willingness to apply the Six Sigma process to solving issues of significance.    It is, at this time, still an investment with expectations of future returns.

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    #97287

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    The University of Texas Medical Center’s MD Anderson Hospital in Houston used Six Sigma successfully in straightening out the logistics and process flow for their radiology department. 
     I think you have hit on an interesting dichotomy in that many universities now profess to have expertise, and belief, in Six Sigma and are busy training and certifying Six Sigma practitioners but very few claim that they are using it in the management and running of the university itself.   Wonder why that is?  

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    All of which are, as you intended, excellent arguments in support of Green Belt training.    It’s not the Land of the Blind, but it’s a very dark terrain out there.

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    #97274

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    As tempted as I was to say, “well EXCUUUSE meeee….”, you were right, I derailed your posting and probably kept others from tracking with your information request.   As the topic of Six Sigma use in university settings interests me also, I’ll see if I can find out anything relevant (I’ll only repost if I do).

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    #97251

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    K.Sathya Narayanan,
    Yes.  I see that now.   Thanks for pointing it out.  I’d missed the indication that it was a 1994 journal article extract.  
     
    I was mostly curious as to whether or not the Socrates program had something new on the horizon.   I was in the Fulbright program a few years back, and although I very much appreciated the opportunity, I would have liked it a little more apolitical in nature.  But that’s picking at the fringes of a very good program, and hopefully not seen as overly critical.
     
    The Socrates program, however, appeared in concept to be purely academic in nature and devoid of political significance or impact.   To your knowledge, has that been the reality of the program?  (Considering the challenges associated with harmonizing the European community.)   Again, just curiosity on my part.   
     
    SSNewby

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    #97210

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    mman,
    As a suggestion, when confronted with another person’s logic, don’t politely fold your cards and get out of the game.  Play your hand out, state your case and rationale.  That’s the only way any of us learn anything through this forum.   I sincerely believe that is the true benefit of reading and participating in the forum.   It’s about as personally non-impactful and non-judgmental a way to joust back and forth with experts in a chosen field as we are going to get in life.   Using a made-up name has some inherent benefits.   A thought gets splattered, it gets splattered, have another one.   

    SSNewby

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    #97209

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    K.Sathya Narayanan,
    I enjoyed reading your posting, but, out of curiosity, why did you refer to the SOCRATES Program as the “proposed” SOCRATES Program.   While more universities are coming on board with the program and some already participating are adding applicable courses, to my understanding, the SOCRATES Program is already in place and viable.  The ERASMUS Program has been in place for 9 or so years, but the linkage between the two programs will allow European universities and their programs to be much more all-inclusive and borderless.   Some neat stuff going on.
    SSNewby
     

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    #97197

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    I think you are missing the point.  It’s all about what you accomplish after you are trained with the Six Sigma methodology and are working on projects.   All that really matters is the of contribution that you make to your organization.  It does not matter what you are titled or called, if you can’t deliver – you are not doing your job, if you consistently deliver – you are doing your job.   We argue far too much in this forum about how you got your training, “certification”, and titles, and not enough about what we do and how we do it.  
    I’d suggest you lighten up about how folks got there and worry about how you and your cohorts are going to make it work.
    Our focus needs to be on creating an ongoing (pragmatic) discussion regarding how we turn the Six Sigma process into a self-sustaining highly contributing reality.    I don’t believe it’s there yet – the discussion or the process.  At least in my little part of the world.
     
     

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    #97116

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    Gemma,
    Try Google Boolean searches using “six sigma” + “lean” +”annual report” or some variant until you get what you need.
    Also, go to UMI Digital Dissertations at http://wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations/   log in answering that you are in academia and enter six sigma or six sigma and lean into the word search – for title and then for text key word search.  It will show you the last two years of dissertations on record along with abstracts that either were specifically about six sigma and lean or at least referenced the topics.   It also lists the school and dissertation chair (the dissertation chair might still be accessible if you called the school, if you had questions).  Good luck with your search and with your dissertation.
    Been there, the best thing about it is when it’s over!
    SSNewby

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    #97114

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    MBB Facts,
    I agree with your recommendations, and would add “Six Sigma Leadership Handbook” by Rath and Strong for good insights into effective Six Sigma program management.
    SSNewby

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    #97104

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    One of the better clarifications of “opportunities” is in the following isixsigma article:
    By Gary Cone
    What Is Value Added With Respect To Opportunity Counting?There are three simple rules:

    The product or service is changed by the process (automatically excludes test and inspection).
    The change must be of value to the customer.
    Right first time (no extra credit for redoing – this distinction is important for things like deburring operations – just because your processing throws a burr doesn’t mean you get credit for it).
    So let’s review. Focusing on what you test and inspect or focusing on what can go wrong drives counterproductive behaviors. Focusing on all value added transformations, at the detail level, provides the best framework for counting opportunities.
    Therefore, DPMO should be expressed as –
    DPMO = (total defects) / (total value-added transformations) * 106
    Where,
    defects are the consumption of resources beyond the minimum required to accomplish the work, and value-added transformations are changes to a good or service that moves it toward the expectation of the customer (internal or external)
     
    Following Gary’s crisp and succinct description, mistake proofing the process does not reduce opportunities, it reduces the errors uncured while making value added (value to the customer, in the eyes of the customer) transformations throughout your process steps.

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    #97070

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    JV
    You are missing a link between Six Sigma and data warehousing and that’s the use of sophisticated data mining algorithms to find missing analysis elements embedded in the data massed in a data warehouse.  Data warehouses can be structured using relational databases and structured vaults, shelves, templates, etc., to provide effective ad hoc queries and routine reporting, but add data mining to that capability and you could make a Six Sigma data grinder’s life much better.   It’s one small (or maybe big) step from data mining to practical applications of complexity theory – predictive analysis through finding patterns where none are thought to exist.  It’s brave new world out there.

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    #97015

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    Thanks Mike.  Sounds reasonable and challenging.   It was good to read your explanation and rationale.   It will help us respect our Six Sigma comrades as we continue to challenge logic and process.  

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    #96787

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    Gee Rog, now I feel bad.  I was just kidding, albeit in a somewhat snotty and, evidently, too abstract way.  And, of course, after thinking about it, I sincerely apologize for being obtuse.  
     I chose fractals as an analogy when I really meant to describe a collection of mentally flagellating repetitive mono-positional techno-crap.   Hope that helped.

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    #96768

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    Member

    Benoit Mandelbrot won the 2003, Japan Prize for Science and Technology, which would seem to many to be the capstone of an illustrious and brilliant Yale math career, yet all of his work with complexity theory and chaotic systems pales in comparison to what this forum has achieved.  
    I may be wrong, but it looks to me that we have created using words and pure logic alone, the philosophical equivalence of a fractal combining the characteristics of both Mandelbrot and Julia sets (a significant accomplishment).   After all the definition of a fractal is best described through its attributes: a fractal is “rugged”, which means that it is nowhere smooth, it is “self-similar”, which means that parts look like the whole, it is “developed through iterations”, which means that a transformation is repeatedly applied and it is “dependent on the starting conditions”. Another characteristic is that a fractal is “complex”, but nevertheless can be described by simple algorithms.   Chaotic system, strange attractors, non-smooth form, endlessly replicating itself yet oddly convoluted – I think we’ve got it.  Fellow Six Sigma-tites, we have done well. 

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    #96661

    SSNewby
    Member

    I know where you can find a development and marketing team.

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    #96656

    SSNewby
    Member

    My company, and industry (pharmaceutical and medical device), tends to try to stay as far into the cutting edge of technology and advances in therapeutic and diagnostic tools as possible, and we frequently lead the customer’s need recognition and perception of value.      The Field of Dreams analogy of “build it and they will come” tends to be too often on target.    Having, proportionately, many MD’s, PhD’s, MBA’s, etc., etc., on staff in product development, marketing, operations, and other roles also tends to lead us into an area of technological/physiological arrogance and feeling that we know better than the market.   Many times we are successful and many times we are not.   Over the years, both our successes and failures have been stunning.  
     The biggest concern that I have is that we very infrequently learn from our failure to calibrate effectively with the customer and his needs/wants.   We chalk it up to the market changing during the latter stages of the developmental cycle, changes to reimbursement regulations, FDA rule interpretations, fickle clinicians, carnivorous competitors, and the list goes on.   One of the biggest benefits of our moving along the Six Sigma path is the absolute necessity on a project-by-project basis to locate and listen to the voice of the customer (internal and external) and to assess all subsequent actions and organizational imperatives against the VOC to determine its cost/benefit/and appropriateness. 

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    #96649

    SSNewby
    Member

    I agree.  If a person needs to be told what to research, he/she does not have a clue about more than just Six Sigma.
    To know what has been researched in completed and accepted dissertations in the last couple of years about Six Sigma (or any other topic) use this web site:   http://wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations/    That and researching isixsigma articles and doing Google Boolean searches will be a lot better than asking people in a forum what to research.   Painfully inappropriate…

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    #96535

    SSNewby
    Member

    While I fundamentally agree with you, I think that the “I” in PIE needs to be expanded to include a few intangibles that don’t revolve around record of achievement, visual aesthetics and bearing – add the undeniable halo of top tier schools (with a more degrees the better weighting) and a strong and savvy emotional IQ to the “I”, and add to “P” the potential performance edge that an MIT engineering education might well provide over small state U, and PIE rules – big time. 
     

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    #96534

    SSNewby
    Member

    Vivek,
    Go to UMI Digital Dissertations at http://wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations/   log in answering that you are in academia and enter Six Sigma into the word search – for title and then for text key word search.  It will show you the last two years of dissertations on record along with abstracts that either were specifically about Six Sigma or at least referenced the topic.   It also lists the school and dissertation chair (the dissertation chair might still be accessible if you called the school, if you had questions).  Good luck with your search and with your dissertation.
    SSNewby
     

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    #96472

    SSNewby
    Member

    I gotcha.  Thanks again for the help.   

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    #96462

    SSNewby
    Member

    I hate to get caught up in circular logic, but following the example that you are using with four screws and four tightenings of the screws, giving eight opportunities for a CTC need of “in place and properly torqued screws” to exist, a means of knowing that you met your CTC/CTQ goal could be through someone having checked, post-tightening of the screws.   If your quality system has a person checking the CTC/CTQ criteria of “screws in place and properly torqued”, you have an observation /tally point to use in your calculation of DPMO.  You had an opportunity to meet your CTC/CTQ goal – what was the result?  I see that as separate and apart from the goal of improving your quality yield to the point of not having to check whether or not the screws have been installed and tightened.   The first is the creation of the metric and the second a logical derivative action/result of having effectively used the metric.   

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    #96438

    SSNewby
    Member

    Thanks for responding.  I was hoping to get your input amongst a few others. 
    When you complete your process map and have identified your transformation points, your test/inspection points become observation points and tally opportunities.  Assuming (and it’s a broad assumption) that effective techniques have been used to identify appropriate transformation control points and are then used as test/inspection (failure observation) points for DPMO calculations, do you then see inconsistencies in the approach?    I live and work in a very risk averse environment stressing a high organizational internal locus of control and much time is spent in process review and establishing appropriate process observation and control points – so I believe that we have a pretty good comparative baseline for process control.   But, I’m also convinced that many opportunities for process improvement exist.
     

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    #96364

    SSNewby
    Member

     John H.,
     
    Well expressed.
     
    Let he who is without the sin of animadversion cast the first aspersion?  (Ergo don’t point with a muddy hand at the mud pit and complain about mud wrestling?)  
     I agree and will try to follow my own advice…     

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    #96362

    SSNewby
    Member

    I agree with some of the previous comments in that I find it difficult to understand where a great many are coming from in these postings.   BOA has an in-place Six Sigma program, and I appreciate hearing about it (the positive and the negative) from truly knowledgeable practitioners.   I like to hear about it, and other Six Sigma programs, in order to learn from successes as well as mistakes.   But most of the posts have been the illiterate and vitriol maligning of the BOA program by outsiders and ex-insiders that didn’t seem (for one reason or another) to be a good fit with the BOA program.  Is that what the forum and the Six Sigma mindset are about?  
     
    I am also disappointed with some of my fellow PhDs who, instead of taking the opportunity to give real insights into Six Sigma analytics and the nuances of program applications, tend to leap head first into the mud wrestling pit – and then complain about it.  Step to the plate guys.  Lead, follow, or get out of the way.  Your infelicitous silence is deafening. 
     
    A less optimistic person reading the postings in this forum wouldn’t form a very good opinion of the professionalism and capability of Six Sigma practitioners, but embedded in the rest of the stuff there is occasionally some valuable insight. 
     My 2 cents worth.

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    #96269

    SSNewby
    Member

    Well… that’s quite a gauntlet thrown down.    I will tell you though why I’m so happy to come to work each day that I get here very early in the morning and leave very late in the evening, if that would help mollify your BOA angst somewhat.  Anyway, it might, for a few minutes, distract from your getting whacked around so much.   From a Six Sigma standpoint my company was very slow to get out of the blocks – my industry (hospital products) was slow to embrace it for various reasons.  But we are now putting a SS program in place, training Leaders, Champions, Black Belts and Green Belts.   The program is supported from the CEO on down, and you can feel the energy from the program.   We have always been a profitable business and have been highly conscious of customer needs regarding product quality, reliability, compliance, and cost – but the dynamics inherent in the Six Sigma program have rekindled a lot of fires around the corporation and made us look at things through a new customer lens.   My charter is to develop and implement the program and it’s one of the most exciting things I done in my career.   A career that has spanned management functions in engineering, quality assurance, operations, and a few plant/company acquisitions and start-ups.   This is really neat and the best thing about it is it will be exactly what we make of it.  It can become wildly successful and grow or it can eventually become convoluted and implode due to its own mass.  But it is ours to develop and grow.    It is moving through 14 plants and 15,000 people and it will be successful.  We have well-educated and well-intentioned people, we are excited about the program, and committed to its success.   I’m typically a hard sell due to many years on the job in responsible “make it work” positions and an analytical background. I’m an engineer with an MBA and a doctorate in operations research – but this (SS) just makes too much sense not to work and work well.   I am sold on the power of SS and enjoy sharing the passion.   I really think this feeling of complete personal and organizational engagement with organizational benefit and buy-in is what SS is supposed to be about.  The only challenge ought to be making it work – and that’s what we get paid to do.  

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