iSixSigma

dan tegel

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  • #185852

    dan tegel
    Participant

    Business of Paradigms by Joel Barker.When I joined Motorola, in 2003, I re-introduced it through six
    sigma. Most of our audiences had not seen it. There are updated
    versions.

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    #91929

    dan tegel
    Participant

    Robbie,We use a vendor supplied order management simulation that participants go through in a 2-3 day period. They are able to apply DMAIC principles to real business problem. 99% of the executives and managers that go through this exercise become real believers in Six Sigma, and also come to learn what to expect from a six sigma project.

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    #90919

    dan tegel
    Participant

    Hi,
    I am the Director for the Motorola Six Sigma program. We use 2 day simulation order management simulation that gives our MBB & BB and executives a hands on experience with how to apply to apply DMAIC, DMADDD, and DMADV. If you would like to find out more and can provide the vendor name. It’s very powerful; most say its the most important part of their BB training.
     
    Dan Tegel 847.576.1969

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    #82392

    dan tegel
    Participant

    I developed a lean/six sigma simulation several years ago to teach people the whole DMAIC process, as well new breakthrough tools.
    Basically, I used an order entry/customer quotation process from a large aerospace company and developed a simulation for people to practice the improvement process. Each individual is assigned a job in the order entry department (Pricing, Scheduling, Materials, Order Coordinator, QC, and Supervisor) and they learn the real jobs and process that was being implemented at this aerospace company. They run the simulation 2-4 times, which allow them to practice each part of the DMAIC and Breakthrough Methodology.
    Before they implement the methods, the process takes about 15-20 min/order, with an average 2-3 defects/order. Using the DMAIC methods they develop a defect free service and cut the time in half.
    After they implement DMAIC, we introduce the Breakthrough Tools, which allows them to cut the original time from 15 minutes to 15 seconds per order (defect free and less labor)! People are blown away, and it makes believers out of them, as well as teaches them the tools.
    If you wanted you could just teach variation reduction using the process. We cover a section on SPC, where they build control charts, and reduce the standard variation in the process.
    * Key Tools we teach with this simulation:
    1) Readiness Assessment, Customer Analysis, Improvement Statements, Process Measures, Process Mapping, Root Cause Analysis, Data Collection, Testing, Process Control, Value Analysis, Breakthrough Goals, Assumption Analysis, and Ideal Design.
    You could probably just focus on few tools if met your needs.
    If you would like to find out more about the simulation, please call me at 760-944-1610.
    Dan Tegel, Ph.D.

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    #80725

    dan tegel
    Participant

    I have managed and initiated several six sigma efforts for Fortune 500 and midsize companies. Key ingredients to success are:
    1) Strong change management orientation. Knows how to get executives and mid-management support. Knows how to get organization wide buy-in using communications, training, consensus building meetings. Should have implemented six sigma or other process initiatives at all levels of the company.
    2) Strategic perspective. How to align six sigma with strategic objectives of the company, so that six sigma is making the company stronger competitively and financially. Many efforts are not focused on strategic issues, but reactive problems. Thus the effort doesn’t sustain itself.
    3) Political savy. Similar to #1, but requires 1-on-1 networking and consensus building.
    4) Ability to get results, quickly to demonstrate early success. Too many six sigma efforts drowned the business and waste time by overanalyzing (collecting way too much data for what is required). Most projects can be analyzed and solutions designed within 1-2 weeks. Anything more is overkill, and loses peoples energy, which you need for implementation.
    5) The best six sigma leaders I’ve seen have a passion for quality, customer service, and business improvement. They are typically frustrated by the status quo and keep pushing to change things.
    6) You need someone who has been through it. It gives credibility to the effort.
    7) Knows a six sigma or process improvement methodology; and has used it, and taught others. I don’t think all the statistical process control stuff and design of experiments is as important as others. Unless you are in a high volume production or process business, then running manufacturing experiments is more important.  In most companies, there are some many processes that are suboptimized, it would be better to get as many big gains, as quickly as possible.
    8) Significant change, out of the box thinker. Most processes can be improved by 50+%, if that is the objective of the project. Go for someone who goes after big change. A risk taker. The gains are there to be had.
    9) Balanced personality. If the person is a true change agent, which is what you need, you need someone with composure. Changing the organization and how business gets done, will upset and anger many. The person must be good a weathering all the snipers. I hope you are ready to support him or her, because others will attempt to undermine anything new. This is guaranteed.
    10) Ability to build trust.  If the person is a straightshooter, and follows through on what he or she says, others may not always like it, but they will come to trust the person. You need trust for others to follow.
    Good luck. If you want any clarification or suggestions, I would be happy to share experiences in getting started, or how to select the best candidates.
    Dan Tegel, Ph.D.
    760-944-1610
    Great question by the way.

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    #76717

    dan tegel
    Participant

    I’ve been through this with several companies, now. The employment continuity policy is critical.  We typically don’t start without that kind of commitment from management.  HOWEVER, people will still feel disenfranchised by having to find new jobs and learning new skills.  It’s most difficult if this is the first project in company.  After several several projects have been done, it gets easier, because people expect it. If not handled properly, other groups will be less hesitant about fully committing to reengineering, process improvement activities.
    What to communicate:
    1) They are valued employees and you want to keep them.  Process change and job change is a way of life. Since they weren’t involved, they will be shocked and angry.  (Although I would be suprised if the rumor mill hasn’t provided a heads up).
    2) There should be a management policy and procedure developed for managing redployment, so people can see that it is thought through and being managed with executive level commitment. The policy should be something to the effect that we will help you find a job equal to or better than what you have. (They shouldn’t have to take a backward move in pay, or position). I do think it is OK to extend this policy to helping employees finding something outside the company as an alternative.  In that case, they should remain on the payroll until they feel satisfied that they have found a better position outside. A textile company I worked with, had this as an ongoing career development policy. If you wanted to change jobs internally or externally, or if there was job displacement due to process improvements, employees were supported in finding a similar or better position. I think it is the support that makes all the difference.
    3) An HR person should be involved in reviewing were other staff needs are. In one company, a large aerospace firm, this was not so too difficult, because there were lots of other “understaffed” departments that could use the employees. In one university, people who took different jobs, were supported with retraining. 
    4) I have also seen companies handle redeployment poorly.  The good news is even, when handled poorly, people adapt, eventually.  But you get mass paranoia about who’s next.  Unfortunately, you can lose good people out of fear.  And you may lose some good people anyway.
    Good Luck
    Dan Tegel, Ph.D.
    [email protected]

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