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24 hour facility – 1 step in the process?

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Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #50239

    Bart Hautala
    Participant

    Im about to walk into a new job starting in 2 weeks as a manufactuirng engineer/production manager/whatever else. During my tour of the facility I notcied how unorganized everything seemed to be i.e. machines out of flow/tons of stock and inventory/confusion in general.
    My question to you would be – in a 24 hour production facility – what would be the best first step to implement to start on the path to lean?
    I was thinking about implementing the 5S concepts throughout the shop floor to improve on efficiency. In the down time of implementation I could in turn reduce the amount of inventory on the shelves and move on to JIT from there.
     
    Thoughts?

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    #172690

    Brandon
    Participant

    Yep, you’re on the right path. Unless it’s a triage situation 5S is typically the best first step. Sets the stage for all the other aspects of Lean.

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    #172691

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Bart Hautala,
    General clean up never hurts but I wouldn’t put anything in concrete (not literally). Start at the point closest to your customer and work backwards into the facility. Knowing the end point helps you understand what the next point up stream needs to supply.
    JIT takes a lot more than cleaning up. It takes a predictable process. That generally takes a combination of the lean tools and process improvement tools to have JIT really make sense. I would think that is a step that is a long way down the road.
    Aside from all that what you saw on a walk through doesn’t necessarily mean much. You might be better off just watching what is going on for a couple weeks. Try entering the facility through a door that most of the management does not use. Show up at various hours throughout the night. It makes you less predictable and you get a better idea of what is happening. If you have FMEA’s carry them with you. It gives you the process flow and you have some information on what can be going wrong at various steps in the operation (that assumes you don’t need a cart to move them around).
    Just my opinion

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    #172692

    Stevo
    Member

    I’m sure you have already thought of these, but I’m going to say it any way, because I see it being critical to the success of any new employee. Step 1 – Observe the operation for enough time to see the real situation, first impressions can be misleading.Step 2 – Build and strengthen the relationships that you will need to be successful.Get buy-in.Don’t alienate your team If the situation is that visible to you already, there is more to the story that you do not know of. Stevo

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    #172693

    Bart Hautala
    Participant

    Thank you for the reply.
    I understand that JIT is a long way down the road and that it will require careful planning throughout to implement sucessfully without disasterous side effects. It was just a thought.
    At any rate, I do not plan to walk into the facility and immediately change everything. Wouldnt make much sense and its not a good way to get the shift workers on your side. I plan on actually working side by side with them walking through the whole process – like you suggested. The facility isnt quite polished so I dont think there are any FMEAs. Thats another thing I plan on introducing to this company.
    The best part about this new job is the ability to grow and shine and have them bow down to my cost saving techniques (thats a bit of humor but not far from the truth).

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    #172694

    Bart Hautala
    Participant

    I replyed to your message before I even knew you posted it! Great minds think alike?

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    #172695

    annon
    Participant

    Identifying your VSs using your priority matrix and spaghetti diagrams and then prioritizing them based on financial data (ie customers, volume, revenue, profits, cost structure, etc) is not a bad place to start.  You can do this individually, quitely, and work with management in understanding the COQ issues in their own language ($$) before you break out the LSS voodoo.
    Good luck.

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    #172696

    Michael Mead
    Participant

    For a new client, I start with a real “Assessment Report” to evaluate how mature each of the quality systems is. Then I follow these steps leading to an “honest-to-God” continual quality improvement system:
    Basic quality management system (ISO 9001:2000 for example)
    5 S
    Layered Process Audits
    Lean Production
    Cost of Quality System
    Statistical Process Control
    Advance Product Quality Planning
    Finally Six-Sigma Culture
    This seems like a logical progression to me, with each step in the correct order, by building on the previous steps and providing necessary input for the following steps.
    Good luck.
     
     

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    #172699

    Stanly
    Member

    Please elaborate more regarding the “Layered process Audits”?
    Please explain the logic hehind your classification
    thanks and regards

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    #172705

    Michael Mead
    Participant

    Oops Stanly, I clicked the wrong button and posted a new message. Anyway, I think I gave a pretty thorough answer. I will say, though, that there are many ways to organize long-term quality improvement strategies. This is one way I use, incorporating names that people are somewhat familiar with, and training materials are available. 

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    #172880

    Paul Gibbons
    Participant

    Bart,
    Adding to the previous excellent suggestions……….
    In parallel to 5S and OEE, how about mapping the overall ‘natural’ value streams and comparing them to the actual structures in place.
    Good luck
    Paul

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    #172891

    Bart Hautala
    Participant

    Thanks for all the replies everyone. I appreciate the responses. One of the benefits of posting on a board such as this is the maturity level. Something thats hard to find on the internet recently.
    I think the way I will start is develop and impletment a 5S system. This is something Im somewhat familiar with and can do pretty much on my own. Then I will attend some training and get the facility ISO certified. The company Im going to is a vacuum pump and vacuum blower manufacturer and I believe they can benefit greatly by being quality certified.

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    #172893

    Bode
    Participant

    If you decide to do 5S, I would also do standard work.  It is hard to agree on what equipment is necessary, if you haven’t agreed on how to do the job.
    If you want so show some dramatic improvements, you should also consider, using some theory of constraints tools and focus on improving your bottle necks.
    Dave

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    #172896

    GrayR
    Participant

    Before you start with implementing tools (5S, JIT, etc.), start with the understanding the business and how well it meets customer needs.  Is product delivery on-time?, are there quality problems?, are there cost issues?,  what about lead times?  Pick the top one or two and work to address it.
    Then drive them to a lower level.  Are the lead times long because of process cycle times (effect of inventory, or batch sizes, or are setup times affecting batch sizes?, or, is unorganized work processes lengthening cylce times?).  Same with any of the other issues (quality problems – why?, poor on-time delivery – why?, etc.). Then use your tools and skills to fix it.  Link the problem with what you are going to use to fix it.  Communicate this to the employees so that they understand why. 
    Don’t start with tools.  Start by understanding where the company needs to improve as a business.  This will get you the support that you need to get the job done, and also anything you do will have a bigger impact.

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    #172897

    Bart Hautala
    Participant

    Makes sense. I would hope that since this company has been around since 1980 that they would have some of their customer and quality issues under control. Its possible that they dont.
    As I said before – Im not going to just waltz in there and star layin down the law, for the first couple of months Im going to spend most of my time on the floor assembling, watching, helping the “crew”. This will allow me an inside look. While doing that I will make suggestions and improve little things i.e. move this closer to your station, lift this higher so its easier to work on. so on and so forth.

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    #173062

    Earl
    Participant

    Be careful. Don’t get into the 5S trap!!  5S is a valuable aspect of lean but too often it becomes a goal unto itself.  Clean, well organized waste is still waste!  5S is meant to identify and elimiante waste so flow cn be created.  It also instills the discipline necessary for JIT, pull, and all the other lean tools. Let 5S help facilitate your lean journey.
     
    Good Luck
    Earl

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    #173063

    barthautala
    Participant

    I kind of want to use 5S as a guieline for organization of the facililty at first. Since the company only carries a few different products I believe the factories employees could easily come to a consensus on what is standard and what is specialty as far as equipement goes. I basically dont want one of my machinist searching for a torque wrench or allen wrench for 5 minutes when it could be placed in a permanent standard location and picked up in 30 seconds.
    OT: This forum should be formatted with VBulletin or similar IMO.

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