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4 categories of waste

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  • #51706

    Edwards
    Participant

    I am doing a home work assignment for school and trying to figure out what the 4 categories of waste in an office or administration are. Can anyone direct me to this information.
    Thanks,
    David
     

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    #179976

    DLW
    Participant

    David,If your assignment is to list THE 4 forms of administrative waste,
    someone has adopted his/her own set. It is well accepted that early
    practioners in Japan (i.e., TPS and what came to be known later in
    the U.S. as Lean) identified and categorized 7 main forms of waste.
    Weternization of these principles added an 8th.While that was in a manufacturing arena, the same basic
    categories can be identified in an office environment (although
    perhaps with some tweaking of terminology and context).You should not need to “figure out” what they are — although you
    probably could with some keen observation. They are listed,
    identified, presented, discussed, and turned inside-out in
    countless places. Not to be snide, but “homework” should entail
    more than relaying the assignment question to someone else to
    answer for you. There are many here happy to help once you have
    made an earnest attempt on your own. And you undoubtedly will
    come across some other useful, helpful information in the process.Good luck.
    DLW – BPEX

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    #179978

    Edwards
    Participant

    Thanks for the reply this has been more than I have been able to locate. I am not looking for someone to tell me the answer. I have no problem doing the work. I haven’t even had my first quality class yet. This is a pre-class assignment. I have looked and would like to just be pointed in a direction.

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    #179979

    Michael W McLean
    Participant

    May I suggest you go to Allan Mogensen and the Ben Graham Goup texts on Work Simplification (Erwin H Schell MIT) and The Improvement Institute (1966) for administration Wastes or as he called it “paerwork Simplification” with Ben Graham in 1941. Even Paul B Mulligan Group had these identifed way back in the 50’s. Mr Toyoda even said he learnt much about Waste and Improvement by seeing and sitting-in on the Work Simplification Improvement Groups and Circles Mogensen and others conducted in GM with Mr Kettering; Proctor & Gamnble; Ford Motor Company Connersville.  If you go topage 45 of “MOGY” ISBN 0-9623050-0-6, or Page 2-30 of the Industrial Engineering Handbook 2nd edition, or page 9 of Quality Digest 1989, you will see the “Flow Process Chart”. It is the ONLY Chart to identify Value and non-value added waste in administration and factory processes aka Dr Shingo and Toyota use it, and they cannot understand the wasteful practice the West exhibits by discarding this excellent tool over the IBM Systems Analsysis flow charting method (now in VISIO, ABC Flowcahrter etc) which does not indentify value not non-value added activities in a process. Hence they see such basic mistakes in BPR, Six Sigma and other Western metholodologies, that they will continue to be profitable and successful over westertn auto companies. Toyota does not have a Six Sigma program (Dr J Liker The Toyota Way).

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    #179980

    DLW
    Participant

    David,Fair enough. Sorry, I may have been a bit snotty. Were you not able to
    find anything with a Google search?Try “what are the 7 forms of waste” and Voila!Then see if you can determine what #8 might be here in the U.S.DLW – BPEX

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    #179983

    Anonymous
    Guest

    Michael,I don’t have any of the references you cited, but I did find this reference on the quality digest site:http://www.qualitydigest.com/jan98/html/flowchrt.htmlAs someone who has actually worked for a Japanese company using TPS, I don’t recognize any of the charts illustrated in the quality digest article.The charts illustrated in the Quality Digest are enormous and seem more like software flow charts.By the way, when some Japanese people say they admire, or learned a lot from something, it can imply they appreciate not having to make the same mistake.No where is this more obvious than in their acknowledgment of Deming, who taught them the economics of either performing 100% inspection or 0% inspection. While the West went towards 0% inspection under Deming’s influence, Toyoda recommended 100% inspection, or Total Confirmation (Kitano)In 1985, I accompanied Jack Scholls and others from MOS 3 to Japan to investigate the so-called 0% inspection touted in the USA. What we found was 100% inspection/test/measurement in the line, both after each operation, sometimes before an operation, and always at the end of the line.At one point Jack almost fell over backwards when he saw two old guys inspecting each die for poor quality inking. When Jack challenged our guide about the 100% inspection, the guide took on an incredulous expression and asked how else could they check all the good die had no ink?This doesn’t imply we shouldn’t use statistical principles, on the contrary how else can we reduce waste. But we cannot reduce waste by through 0% inspection when our process operations are not capable, or where process operations are highly correlated. (interference)Andy

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    #179984

    howe
    Participant

    Andy – I have the 1989 Quality Digest which has the Flow Process Chart. Yes am aware of the 1998 one and you concur with what I said that it is for Systems. It was as I said invented by IBM and is the basis for their Systems Analysis. I have copy of the Toyota Supplier QA Manual and they do use “Process Flow Charts” as described in their
    SUPPLIER QUALITY ASSURANCE MANUAL – MANUFACTURING QUALITY CHARTS & FAILURE MODE EFFECT ANALYSIS SECTION 08 PAGE 1 of 6  QA & QC DEPARTMENT SECTION 08: PROCESS PLANNING/MANUFACTURING QUALITY CHARTS (MQC)  Process Flow Must show all processes based on Process Flow Chart”
    Process Flow Charts are as you may know are included within the 4th Edition of TS16949 FMEA Workbook.
    Shigeo Shingo uses it in his on and off-line changeover studies for SMED.
    I mentione dthe Ben Graham Group in the USA and they can provide more information than I as they knew Allan Mogensen or go to their web site.
    Oh – congrats on the new President and the Black American Preacher have a resounding and we think in Australia, uplifting and almost Martin Luther King’ess, sermon. Brilliant.
    Mike 

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    #179988

    Anonymous
    Guest

    Hi Mike,A few years ago someone put many Toyota documents up on the internet – I’ve got copies … somewhere.The chart we used is sometimes called a Ladder chart. The chart has all the operations on the left hand side, and then there are three columns on the right to record transport time, storage time, delay time, and set-up time.Is that what you’re referring to?Cheers,
    Andy

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    #180004

    BritW
    Participant

    Possibly:
    Transportation—movement of materials or persons
    Inspection—review of previous activities (e.g., quality activities)
    Delay—any time an activity cannot be performed when needed
    Communications—transmission of information between persons
    These come from a form I used to use for a process called activity analysis.  Not entirely sure of the origin – the form in my possession is probably 20+ years old from my IE days in the 80’s an 90’s.

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    #180018

    Pravin Bhaise
    Participant

    Dear David,
    When I undertake training program for office staff I ask them to reduce the four types of waste –
    1. Man 2. Machine 3. Material 4. Method
    It looks funny but office working staff is addicted to waste the above four categories like a person sitting in the cabin may demand files or other documents to his subordinate quite often which is waste of man, may put the air conditioner on when the ambiente temperature is 23oC or will not shut down his computer /laptop while leaving for home which is waste of machine & resources, may take coffee, biscuits quite often than required for the sake of enjoyment or printing papers which can be avaidable which is the waste of material and trying to extend the project due to overall factors which is due to wrong method.
    In fact now a days staying long in the office is a fashion for singles either married or unmarried. So when these people stay long in the office they create waste in the above manner.

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