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Six Sigma Scoring

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums General Six Sigma Scoring

This topic contains 7 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Strayer 3 weeks, 4 days ago.

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  • #237424

    DaveB
    Participant

    Hi, I’ve recently joined this site because I have a problem I can’t solve: We use 6S here, and some departments repeatedly achieve the highest 6S scoring, my question is, where do I go from here, how do I raise the bar so to speak to set new challenges, we surely can’t simply get a high score each and every time.

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    #237512

    Alexander Silantyev
    Participant

    Hi Dave,
    I haven’t heard about Six Sigma scoring by department. And I’m even questioning if it’s a right approach. I think an organisation or entity thereof can and should be assessed in Continuous Improvement maturity (that includes Six Sigma). On the departmental level, I would talk about 5S. Was this something you may be referring to?
    Can you provide more context about what exactly you’re measuring or assessing? But whatever it is, if you’re already reaching the maximum points, the scale of your questionnaire needs to be redefined. The highest score should be linked with some “ideal picture” which you can pursue but you may not be able to reach in the nearest future, not an all the dimensions anyway…

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    #237515

    Rhb
    Participant

    Sounds like you are mixing 6S which is adapted 5S vs. Six Sigma. Six Sigma is statistically driven process improvement, while 5S or 6S is Lean attribute improvement. Is this true?

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    #237519

    Shawn Wildman
    Participant

    They are using a 6S – Sort, Straighten, Shine, Standardize, Sustain, Safety. I usually discourage companies from using 6S. Don’t separate SAFETY from the other phases, SAFETY should be considered during EVERY step of 5S and not separately.

    Perfect scores are exactly what you’re looking for as it signifies compliance with the process. 6S audits should be considered a method of ensuring the 6S process is SUSTAINED, they are a form of Management Standard Work. The audit process is designed to demonstrate to everyone in the Organization that the work to sustain the 6S gains is important. Continuous auditing communicates to everyone in the Organization that this process is genuinely important to the success of the Organization. Adherence to this process will eventually begin to change the culture of the Organization toward a 6S culture. Further 6S improvements come from other areas like Value Stream Maps, Employee suggestions, and spin offs from other Lean events.

    There are downsides to audits however. If Employees know when the audits are they tend to let 6S standards slip and then perform a last minute clean up just before the audit. Or, if auditors don’t take the process seriously audit check sheets can become an exercise in “pencil whipping” (marking everything as OK without actually looking at the items on the list). These aren’t the behaviors the Organization is looking for.

    The true key to changing the culture within the Organization to a 6S culture AND making the other forms of standard work in your facility stick is Leadership Standard Work at the floor level. A Supervisor should never walk past an area without scanning the area to see if ALL STANDARD WORK is in compliance. This includes visual standards from 6S events, standard operating procedures are followed, inventory control systems are in compliance, etc. If ANY standard is not in compliance the Supervisor begins to ask “why”. The answers drive what the Supervisor does next. If there is a suspected “better way” the Supervisor begins the process of investigating and if needed a new Kaizen event is initiated. Or, if Employees are simply not following standard work the Supervisor corrects the behavior and gets Employees back on path. This is the simplest and most effective way to maintain the Continuous Improvement efforts within the Organization. However, it can be one of the most difficult changes to implement due to the entrenched Supervisor methods in US Manufacturing.

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    #237524

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @DavidB I have never heard of SS scoring. I am not sure it even makes any sense. This sounds like some program either created by management or a consultant has sold it to management.

    Bottom line is your sigma level is a score. It is pretty much a score that management doesn’t understand. You can move to dpmo but once to get to op counts they figure out pretty quickly it is easier to increase opportunities than reduce defects. The metric that people understand is dpu. Defects per Unit (number of defect/number of units processed) Everybody gets that number. It can be converted to Sigma easily if you are under 10% defective. If you aren’t under 10% you have bigger issues to worry about than your dpu.

    It sounds like your system is more of an audit? Attribute type data?

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    #237526

    Shawn Wildman
    Participant

    I’ve seen companies “score” 5S compliance within an audit quite often. The area is audited per compliance across each of the 5S’s. It isn’t a long term solution, but as I mentioned above it’s a method to help companies who are unfamiliar with Leadership Standard Work sustain a 5S system.

    I think it’s a good starting point, but don’t use it as a crutch for long. It will become a chore and ultimately fail if you use it as a long term solution.

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    #237527

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @daveb Just another thought. At Motorola we originally had a target of 10 fold improvement over 2 years and 100 fold improvement over 4 years. There were some other assumptions that went along with it but it didn’t work out well.

    If you look at the 10X and 100X improvement it comes down to a 68% reduction in defects per year. If you think about that you are “measuring defect reduction” so on a low sigma you have a high defect level and need a large reduction. On a high sigma level you have a low defect level and a low defect reduction. Regardless of where you are at the rate of improvement doesn’t change. Measure the rate of improvement instead of some SS score. Basically it will force them to live the CI process in real life. You cannot get into reducing defects on a pretty good process with something you do not actually work every day.

    Do not let them throw in some shift number either. If they think something shifts make them measure it and use the measured number.

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    #237587

    Strayer
    Participant

    I’ve seen companies use sigma score to evaluate performance of departments and projects. Sure, you can put a number on it. It’s just math. But it’s missing the point. What we care about is the quality we deliver to our customers. Some companies, GE for one, got so hung up on internal competition that they lost sight of that. Have you checked GE stock prices lately?

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