iSixSigma

6sigma/Kaizen/Lean Strategy

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General 6sigma/Kaizen/Lean Strategy

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #30528

    Mike Hamner
    Participant

    I recently have been given the task of coming up with a strategy to link our 6 sigma program, Kaizen program, and lean manufacturing inititives into a single breakout strategy.  We want to be able to capture the benifits of these programs without them overlapping onto one another and causing confusion and diminished benifits.  Does anyone have similar programs or any advice on how best to define a strategy to link these three tools togethor?

    0
    #79568

    Ron
    Member

    Mike,
    You are going in the right direction. I believe it must ave been consultants that decided to place a barrier between lean and six sigma.
    Most major companies are combining these initiative to create a potent problem solving approach.
    Kaizen is simply a project accelerator.. Use it in both Lean and Six sigma projects to speed the time to resolution.
    Most organizations view lean as process flow tools kits and sixsigma as variation reduction toolkits. Merge them together and you have a perfect toolbox.
    There has always been a chicken and egg controvery which do you do first lean or sixsigma. While my choice is lean then sixsigma a more energetic approach says do them simultaneously as needed.
     
    You are on the right path ! By the way if your experience islike mie,,you will findmore people accepting the lean approach faster than the sixsigma approach.
     

    0
    #79679

    Viktor Fritsch
    Member

    Dear Mr. Hamner,
    At the moment we discuss and develop an improvement system to connect our Six Sigma programm with our etablished CIP – Programm.
    In our opinion it is possible and necessary to work with different systems (max. two syst. ) .
    CIP ( Kaizen ) in our company is established for the mikro working system means the
    immediate neighbourhood of the workplace.
     
    But Six Sigma for process improvement ( oricess variation ).
    Six Sigma is  a top town – extension , CIP from bottom up.
    I think with this point of view we can find a way to work in  the future .
     
    Best Regards,
     
    Viktor
     
     
     
     

    0
    #79682

    Eoin Barry
    Participant

    Mike – They, lean, 6S, Kaizen are inclusive tactics. Possibly the main barrier is terminology.
    I would suggest that the goal is an “effective organisation”. How you define it and your present state will dictate where you want to go. The nature of the gap will determine the appropriate tools or vehicle to get there.
    A place to start: simplify the terminology, seek to explain Kaizen – 6S and Lean  to yourself in normal, everyday language. Articulate your vision in the this simplfied langauge. Bounce it off a confidant – refine it – share it with your leader and see if you are on the same page and then roll it out to your leadership group: in straight forward terms.
    Based on data you have collected plan your projects with your team. Plan with the end in mind first then the vehicle in which to get there.
    When you gather data seek to understand the nature of the opportunities – select the appropriate tools and people then pick the ones with the biggest “bang for your buck”.
    All the best,
    Eoin

    0
    #79684

    John Adamo
    Participant

    Here is what we did.
    We created a Continuous Improvement Group (you can call it whatever makes sense for your organization).  This group is responsible for improving product quality (external failure costs), process improvements (internal failure costs; i.e., effeciency improvement, scrap reduction, etc), resolving customer complaints (old fashion probelm solving), and we are beginning to look at transactional processing as well. 
    The tools we use to execute these projects are DMAIC (Six Sigma), Kaizen Events (KAIZEN, LEAN), Seven Step (or 8-Discipline) Problem solving approach, or sometimes we use the technical “Just Do It” Approach.  We have our Improvement Staff cross-trained in these toolsets.  The training is not to the level where they can conduct the project, but really just to recognize what toolset is most appropriate for the project at hand.
    The most important piece of the system is having the organization structure in place to support the project.  The project sponsor must be involved, active, and interested in the project or else (at least for us) the project will take much longer than it should. 
    Hope this helps,
    John 

    0
    #79686

    Marcel Power
    Participant

    Mike,
    here at Raytheon we incorporate all three, plus 5S, under the umbrella of six sigma.
    we do a lot of ‘kaizen blitzes’ here, whereby we incorporate lean and 5S and call it a six sigma project. 
    this is the proper sequence; when you have a stable process with your WIP levels under control and the area has been 5S’d then you can actually start doing process improvement- the Japanese have a saying that goes like this “you’re on a small boat and you’re worried about the white water rapids, well it’s the rocks laying beneath the water that you should be concerned with”…look past the obvious.
    there’s a lot of reference material  out on the web, eg; Michael George from the George Group has put out a book “lean six sigma”.  This web site has a lot of good info; I like to go to a website’s “links” page to see where they get their info from.
    best of luck
    Marcel Power
    [email protected]

    0
    #79687

    Marcel Power
    Participant

    that email is actually
    [email protected]
    I typically type typos when I type
    Marcel

    0
    #79700

    Lisa Highberger
    Participant

    Mike,
     
    We have integrated Lean and Six Sigma tools into our Value-Based Six Sigma program. The Lean and Six Sigma initatives are parallel paths that we use to acheive our corporate goals. I am currently putting together the Lean Plan for my value center. We see Lean as a cultural change that all levels of the organization are required to embrace. This goes past the problem solving cross function team concept of Six Sigma.The assessment of opportunities for Lean needs to center around the 8 Wastes ( #8 is poor or incorrect utilization of people). Once you identify your opportunities for waste elimination you will probably find that Six Sigma teams will be required to address some of the issues. The traditional 5S, TPM, Pull systems, Cell layout and SMED are owned more by Lean teams. Hope this helps!
    Lisa

    0
    #79707

    jtucci
    Participant

    Mike,
    We have developed some models and tools for integrating Lean and Workout tools (particularly useful in transactional processes)  into Six Sigma Deployments.  Here are a couple of insights that are emerging.
    1.  Do not introduce Lean as a separate intiative.  Use DMAIC as the framework for all improvement projects.  What flexes are the tools and emphasis you place on each phase of DMAIC based on the nature of the problem you are trying to solve.  For example in a “Lean Heavy” Project the Analyze phase focuses less on analyzing and identifying root cause of process variation and more on using Value Stream Mapping to identify non-value added activities (waste).  The Improve Phase uses lean design strategies to develop the “should be” process versus DOE.  In Workout projects which are closer to “just do its” the D phase is critical to make sure the project is scoped in a way that encourages rapid improvement while minimizing the risk of upstream and downstream consequences.  The DMAIC cycle looks more like this DmaIC.  Less focus on measurement and analysis more on implementation of common sense solutions and control plan to lock in gains.
    2.  The key to integration is a project selection and scoping process that is effective at “Separating the Fruit” by matching the the right tools based on the nature of the problem and also factoring into the equation the political or change management factors in the target environment.  For example, even thought the “right” way to solve a given problem might be the classic defect reduction approach of the core Six Sigma tools.  You may not have the time or the management support to to take 4 – 6 months required for  atypical black belt project.  You may need to “stop the bleeding” using a Kaizen or Workout approach to implement some quick fixes that then can provide the “air cover” to go after root cause.
    We have developed some simple tools and models to help leadership teams reach consensus on the right gameplan for improvement that balances the “ideal” with the “reality” of time constraints, resource constraints and change readiness. 
    Let me know if you would like to talk further.  I can be reached at 269 383 3400 or [email protected].
     

    0
    #79716

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Mike,
    I am going to take a minority opinion on this issue. Everyone seems to want to fit Lean into a Six Sigma format. Since most problems don’t require a SS solution it really doesn’t make sense except that it is easier to sell from the “I wan t o be like Jack” perspective.
    If you follow the lean steps simply as they are: Work Place Organization (which includes 5S), Standardized Work, Continuous Improvement (which can be either Kaizen – incremental improvement or kaikaku – breakthrough), and JIT/Kanban. The integration is already there and has been since the Toyota Production System was put in place. Basically the first two steps take people induced noise out of the system (Work Place Organization and Standardized Work). When that noise has been removed it makes the selection of projects much easier because you can now determine what will take a more incremental approach and what need a breakthrough. Juran illustrates this in his book “Managerial Breakthrough” page 7. Projects live in a continuous state of Kaizen until they hit a point that requires breakthrough – do SS and return to Kaizen. The last step of JIT and Kanban is only possible when you have a process that is predictable. That predictability is the result of the first 3 steps.
    Before you spend a lot of time on self agrandized consultants and BS packaging of a system that has been document and used for years do some of your own work. If they want you to buy into the nonsense that they developed anything just look at the Motorola, Allied and GE deployments. They all had Lean and SS. 
    All you need to do is implement it. Grab two books (maybe 3). Jurans “Managerial Breakthrough,” “Lean Thinking” by Womack, and “Toyota Production System’ by Monden. Read it for concepts and extrapolate it to your situation. Don’t waste your time looking for case studies. If you comprehend the strategy and the theory you can apapt it to work for you.
    Just my opinion.
    Good luck.

    0
    #79763

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Viktor,
    What does thatmean when you say the CIP is a Bottoms Up program?

    0
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.