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Age Old Question

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Age Old Question

This topic contains 11 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  thevillageidiot 14 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #40627

    Taylor
    Member

    Can anyone of the sigma experts suggest what “controls” to put in place when the defect is that some staff just slack off and do not follow the correct and consensually developed documented procedure for a service process?

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    #126508

    Jim H
    Participant

    1. You get what you measure
    2. Every process runs at the level it has been designed for – meaning if it has been designed to rely on the conscientious behavior of the workforce, but that input is not truly there, then performance will degrade to what the design allows.
    3. “Whatever” is not really consensual input into documented procedures.
    Look at the root causes of the defects you are seeing – make sure that the root cause IS people slacking, and put controls and incentives in place that address the defect.  For example – if the process is typing data into a document, and there are too many typos, make sure you eliminate process-induced causes like improper lighting, poor ergonomics, bad inputs (ex: having to transfer data from a poor fax copy).  Once you eliminate the causes that are not people-related, look at your best performers as your process benchmark, and set incentives based on what you know the process is capable of.

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    #126509

    Peppe
    Participant

    Common story …  Processes developed by experts and released to not experts, so results aren’t as expected. Design your process on worker skills or if apply experts process, increase workes skills.
    Rgs, Peppe

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    #126511

    HF Chris
    Participant

    Not always the case. Many projects are started to reinvent the wheel when the process is already there and not being used. The question then (if the standards are correct) is to see what metrics are guiding the service transactions of the employees. Are we pushing the employees to reduce time, increase volume, and follow up with standards later if time allows. Do we say you have to be perfect but….if not these exceptions are acceptable. Don’t always be to quick to blame the expert.
     
    Chris

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    #126513

    Peppe
    Participant

    I’m not blaming anyone, it isn’t my habit, maybe just my poor english … I just highlighting what often happen. A process is devepoled by an experts and then must be shared with standard workers and only after common sharing, can be standard. Different matter is procedures not applied. If not applied,  how are  you shure they are right ?
    Rgs, Peppe

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    #126550

    thevillageidiot
    Member

    Was it Schewart or Demming that indicated 96% of all process issues are a result of the design itself?….In any regard, the point is the same….People are like your process….their behaviors will align with the managerial process….IF IF IF you know the process is in an ideal state (stable and fully capable while properly centered) when properly manned, then look to how your operators are managed.  Based on your assertion, the current controls are not effectively delivering the performance you want….your managerial system is inept….it isnt the workers fault, they follow the path of least resistance based on the system the organizaiton puts in place….If you are not seeing behavior align with strategic goals, your work force is either unwilling or unable to meet them…herein lies your project.  Good luck.

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    #126551

    thevillageidiot
    Member

    Berilla’a Hiearchy of Leadership

    Influence through principle
    Influence through expertise
    Influence through amicablity
    Influence through reward
    Influence through punishment
    Moral of the Story:  Seek honor, knowledge, friendship, and profit in all things.  It still unable to change behavior, fire the bastards.

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    #126558

    Darth
    Participant

    Shewhart and Deming!!!!!!!!!!

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    #126565

    AT
    Participant

    And what if even the incentives pegged at the best performers’ results don’t work to improve the performance of the rest? Call them laggards and fire them like Jack Welch did? If we do, will the culture of fear grip the organization slowly but surely??

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    #126574

    Ron
    Member

    What form of measurement system do you have in place to monitor the compliance to the process? If none put one in place.
    Second thought review the procedure does it make sense are the people doing the rightthing and the procedure is viewed as cumbersome.

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    #126575

    jimmie65
    Participant

    1. Make sure the root cause is “slacking off” (and it often is – despite Deming)
    2. Set clear and attainable goals for the process, based on the average or slightly above average operator – not the superstar. (You can always raise the goal later as everyone improves).
    3. Make sure the affected employees are involved in developing the procedure and that they feel they were involved – these are not always the same thing!
    4. Poka-yoke the process. Remove/limit operator control (as much as possible) from machine speed, put in jigs for assembly, etc.
    5. Tie in incentives to productivity
    6. Redesign the process so the failure to keep up is immediately obvious – downstream operator has no work; upstream WIP is stacking up behind the operation, etc. If everyone is tied to your incentive, the other operators will not tolerate this situation for long.
    7. Retrain the operator
    8. As a last resort, document discplinary action and then reassign or terminate. This will not create a culture of fear if the above steps were taken – and taken in a very visible manner. In a culture rooted in continuous improvement, incentives for productivity, and collaboration, the other operators may be glad to have someone who slowed them down out of the way. (And yes, this has been my experience. The above steps generally work. But I’ve had to ask a manager to release an employee – and was thanked for it by other operators.)
    The true key is to develop a collaborative environment where operators: 1) are motivated to perform well; 2) own their processes; and 3) feel their input is accepted and valued by CI personnel as well as management.

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    #126594

    thevillageidiot
    Member

    Either they both said it very vehemently, or I have committed the sacriledge (sp) of misspelling their names…I believe it is the latter….I stand corrected.  Thanks for the correction!

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