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Alternatives to Pugh Matrix

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Strayer 8 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #53692

    roarty
    Participant

    Hi,

    We currently use a Pugh matrix to screen new product ideas. We rate each idea on a large number of commercial and technical criteria. Unfortunately the number of criteria is too large to be an effective tool where several people are involved. For example in a meeting of 10 people the task of filling out the matrix becomes very time consuming.

    Are there alternative screening processes more suitable to group decisions? A simple show of hands is quick and easy but lacks the transparency and detail of how the decision was reached. We need to be able to justify our decision to others outside the group.

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    #191127

    Eric Maass
    Participant

    Hi Karma,

    Well, one alternative that was developed for group decision making is Accord’s Robust Decision software package:

    http://www.robustdecisions.com/decision-making-software/

    Best regards,
    Eric

    P.S. No, I”m not a salesman for Accord….they demonstrated their product to me several years ago, and I’ve kept it in the back of my mind for situations where group decision making might require a tool beyond the Pugh Matrix approach.

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    #191128

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    You’re using the Pugh Matrix in the wrong way (albeit a very common way). It is not meant to be used to choose, rather to synthesize. Nearly every concept has both advantages and disadvantages. The Pugh matrix is meant to help a team to analyze these pluses/minuses and find ways to synthesize to come up with even better concepts.

    What you want is a decision-making matrix. You can actually adapt a Cause/Effect matrix very effectively for this purpose. The effects are the decision criteria, each of which can be weighted for priority. The causes are the various options you are evaluating. Judge each option according to each decision criterion. Weight the scores (a spreadsheet will do this for you) and the highest ranking option is the winner.

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    #191139

    Strayer
    Participant

    If you are interested in leveraging group wisdom and driving to consensus, multi-voting works well. Have each person write down their top three choices. Collect and tabulate the results. Disregard the 1,2,3 ranking. The choice that appears most often is probably the one everyone can agree on. Since you have many criteria I would adivse to do this for each of them and let the numbers tell the tale rather than jumping to the final choice. Have the group choose their top three for criterion A, top 3 for criterion B, and so on. And since some criteria are more important than others, use multi-voting to weight the criteria.

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    #191166

    roarty
    Participant

    Thanks for the feedback guys.

    I passed on the suggestions. I had a quick look at the robust decisions software. It is exactly the type of thing I had in mind. We felt however that we are already inundated with IT solutions and the software is probably overkill for what we need (we usually generate only 6 to 8 new ideas per quarter) – A good suggestion though.

    The multi voting system was also considered but voting ballots for each criteria was thought to be too time consuming. Although personally I was in favour of this solution.

    Also interesting comments about cause/effects matrix. I think this is something I’ll have to do some reading on.

    Our final decision was to split the Pugh Matrix up. With each subset of criteria to be filled out by the expert in that area. This lacks the consensus approach I was pushing for but at least there is input from several people and not just my subjective opinion.

    So thanks for your suggestions, they generated a good debate.

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    #191167

    Strayer
    Participant

    Of course you realize that you might as well have each subject matter expert submit his/her choice from the assigned subset and trust their judgement. If you aren’t satisfied with this, you might still consder multi-voting. It doesn’t have to be a time-consuming secret ballot. You can do it with a simple show of hands. Just instruct the group to vote for three and count the hands for each. I’ve worked with teams that have used show of hands successfully. Granted, there’s a chance that some people will wait to see who raises a hand first and then agree, but if you can’t trust the group to honestly express their opinions you have a bigger problem.

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