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Assessing Deployment Success

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Assessing Deployment Success

This topic contains 17 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Fontanilla 11 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 18 posts - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #49772

    Fontanilla
    Participant

    Has anybody attempted to create some sort of index to “measure” the effectiveness of a LSS deployment? If so, what was the method and criteria you used?
     

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    #170564

    George 4
    Participant

    Please elaborate more,thanks

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    #170573

    Brandon
    Participant

    Dan, the majority of the performance measurement systems I’ve seen are finacially based. That is, all costs are captured and related to the financial gains in an ROI model…some are very sophisticated. This approach will give you a good view yet, as would be expected, it is only measuring financial impact.
    Others, and I’ve seen only a few of these, combine the use of a Balanced Scorecard and LSS’s impact on all the strategic objectives of the company – not just earnings.
    This can be a rather complex model…but then who said managing a business is easy?
    So, if oyu really want a measurement system I would suggest you look into the Bal Score approach.

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    #170617

    Dr. Ravi Pandey
    Participant

    Dan,
    Only as a thought..
    1) Financial: Total $, $/per person, ROI
    2) Penetration/Competency/culture: %trained
    3) Sustainability: % continue to to utilize or #project/person/year without the mandate or may be post certification project execution
    There are few more I can not recall at this time.
     
    rgds
    -ravi

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    #170644

    w. g. miller
    Member

    Should you audit anything (not just a Six Sigma program), the first thing have to do is make sure you are getting honest data.  I worked at a company where the managers were required to publicly praise Six Sigma at every opportunity.  Privately, these same managers told me the Six Sigma program was an unwelcome distraction whose claims of “success” were highly questionable, but they couldn’t tell that to the upper managers without grave career risk.
    In the case of Six Sigma, your program auditors should be independent of your company’s Six Sigma progam, and they should be able to tell their observations (good and bad) to the appropriate people without fear of consequences, even if they are giving a bad report to a senior manager with a personal interest in the program.
    W. G. Miller 

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    #170645

    Vallee
    Participant

    W.G.,So if the higher up managers were telling people to praise six sigma publicly at every opportunity, who do you think the auditors would work for… unless your plan is to hire an external audit company which would be a waste of money. This is a sign of poor implementation and poor metrics. No matter who the auditors turn out to be, if the managers do not support or trust the program it will continue to fail regardless of the metrics.HF Chris Vallee

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    #170646

    w. g. miller
    Member

    HF,Perhaps you are right – if the senior managers will only believe their Six Sigma deployment is a rousing success and will not believe and then punish anyone who says otherwise, then assessing deployment success is a waste of resources. Still,I think independently assessing Six Sigma deployment success should be done.W. G. Miller

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    #170650

    Brandon
    Participant

    HF, I agree with your assessment entirely. This situation is about incompency at the middle mgr level. If SS is not contributing to improved performance it is they who are impeding it…through poor project selection, inadequate resource allocation…or their desire to hide other incompencies of theirs.
    YET, one must ask, where is senior mngt in watching them. Much in turmoil here.
    So, it goes back to my first comment in this string – SS doesn’t fail, people fail.
    A slide rule does not give incorrect answers….when used properly.

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    #170670

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    W.G. Miller,
    I agree with the independent audit particularly if you are quoting financial numbers. We have been using third party audits such as Ernst and Young and PWC.
    Just my opinion

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    #170678

    w. g. miller
    Member

    Brandon et al:
    You assert that because middle managers didn’t really accept a Six Sigma program they were somehow defective.  In this case, I will claim the opposite:  the Senior Managers were so emotionally attached to their pet Six Sigma program that they refused to see the program flaws, much less do something about them.  Add to that a corporate culture that heavily penalized telling Senior Managers that something wasn’t working, and you got to where they are today: a Six Sigma program that is given lip service in public, and rejected in private.
    W. G. Miller
     

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    #170679

    Vallee
    Participant

    W.G.,Actually that was my point, the senior leadership did not support a valid program therefore an independent audit would just be another voice if this was their true perspective. The parameters were not set up appropriately from the get go. Now on the other side of the coin were middle managers not originally accepting the six sigma program? Leadership chose to use this method to change culture to a dynamic cultural change. Prior to any implementation a stakeholder assessment must be done anonymously by the six sigma champion and this must guide what is in scope and what is not in scope. This would have alleviated what you saw.HF Chris Vallee

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    #170680

    w. g. miller
    Member

    HF et al,
    The middle managers did start skeptical of the Six Sigma program.  Unfortunately, the observable performance of the Six Sigma group did little to win the middle managers over.  The Six Sigma group’s work definitely lacked the quality they expected us workers to maintain.  Nevertheless, the Six Sigma group was (and is) a senior manager’s pet project, and so was given a free hand and became an untouchable empire.
    This is a good example of a program with lots of problems that are easily observable to an independent auditor.  Unfortunately, you may have been right in a previous post: if a senior manager will reject reports from his own organization that say a program isn’t working, there is no reason to believe he will accept the same information from an independent auditor (even if it is an outside firm).
    I fear this Six Sigma program is doomed to mediocre performance because it can’t acknowledge its own problems.  That mediocre performance is readily apparent to the middle managers, and fuels the skepticism they can only state in private.
    W. G. Miller

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    #170681

    Vallee
    Participant

    W.G.,Correct me if I am wrong, but this sounds like an ongoing problem. However, if this is true it does not mean it is hopeless. The key is to find the people on the floor, in middle management, and senior management that everyone trusts and go to in times of need. Show them the issues and areas that could be improved and start with small wins with honesty upfront. The good, the bad, and the ugly with good communication on the floor. The senior leader needs to participate through the whole project. HF Chris Vallee

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    #170683

    Brandon
    Participant

    WG, I see an opportunity for one or more of the middle mgrs to be a hero in all of this.
    SS done correctly works, who can refute that. Sr Mngt loves it. If someone steps up and gets it to work – they win on both accounts.
    No guts – no glory!

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    #170914

    RhinoNeil
    Member

    Prior company I worked for used a “Maturity Score” method to measure it’s deployment of Six Sigma.
    Basically a simple table with five categories –
    Management Commitment
    Communication
    People skills/Training
    Project Selection
    Metrics
    At the start of each year, every Manager would score their area of respsonsibility with a score for each out of 5. 1 being very limited deployment, 5 being masters. Each score in each topic had specific milestones and measures and all had to be achieved before somebody could give themselves that score (e.g. to achieve a 2 for Metrics it was something like – SS goals considered responsibility of SS Organisation, Financial savings focus on direct savings and other metrics = number of belts trained and projects completed. Yet a 3 score was – benefits exceed 3% of businesses costs, projects moving beyond direct savings into indirect and strategic projects. Other metrics start to be come process measurements DPMO etc.).
    Total score out of 25 was “Maturity Score” for Process, Office, Country, Region etc.
    Measurement done on several levels but lowest score taken on “add-up”, e.g. if offices rated themselves (i.e. 4 Offices scores = 2,2,3,4) then lowest score of all of them was score for Country add-up (2).
    Important part was that Management was never, ever criticised or challenged for giving a low score (and this from an organisation where all upper management were ex-GE). Once a score was given then an Action Plan was agreed (and of course the progress of the Action Plan would be heavily criticised by Management).
    Will not help when Managers lie about their commitment but if honest discussion was very good starting point to improving the deployment in any area of a business.
    Several areas on the web detail “Maturity Scores” if oyu need more research.
    Hope it helps. Will expand if you need any more help.
    RhinoNeil

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    #170973

    lin
    Participant

    Just a quick add to RhinoNeil’s response.     Several recent articles have been published regarding the iSSSM six sigma maturity model.    Easiest place I know to find it is at the Instantis home page or perhaps ISSSP website.     Our team has been wrestling with a similar question and has recently begun work to integrate the iSSSM maturity model, Michael Hammer’s Process Audit (Harvard Business Review) and a set of lean maturity criteria (Shingo).    Our objective is to create a self assessment tool that; (1) helps support our longer term vision of excellence and (2) provides a gap analysis that will then become an input to the planning process.

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    #170976

    Fontanilla
    Participant

    Do you suggest a third party assessor (similar to the ISO)?

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    #171006

    Fontanilla
    Participant

    See John P. Kotter’s Leading Change 1996, Harvard Press for 8 metrics you might use to assess your deployment.  It is really cultural change you’re aiming for and Kotter does a great job of it in his book.

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