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Attrition Rate Reduction Project

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  • #49301

    Jeff
    Participant

    I have been tasked with a project to reduce the attrition rate at my company. For 2007 our monthly attrition average was 54%. A conservative estimate put the cost at around $20 million for the year. And that is only calculating direct costs using conservative figures. I need some advice on what metrics to use. I’ve been told that I have to reduce attrition and the cost related to it. That’s my charter from my executive team. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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    #168344

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Jeff,
    In my humble opinion, you have much deeper concerns than the “right metrics” to use for this project.Β  If you are losing more than half of your employees every month, you’d better find out why they are leaving.Β  Once found, do you have the authority to change the policies, procedures, pay, benefits, rewards, recognition, culture in order to improve the end result, i.e.: attrition.Β  From where I sit, it sounds like you have the metrics:Β  attrition and its costs to the company.Β  You are bleeding from a main artery, so first you have to stop the bleeding.Β  Worry about the other stuff later.
    In my humble opinion, this is not an issue to be delegated, but one the top level guys should be taking on, maybe with your help.
    Just my 2 cents worth.
    Shooter

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    #168346

    Jeff
    Participant

    Shooter,
    Your humble opinion is right on target with what I was thinking. I guess my problem is trying to narrow the CTQs for the project. Attrition has many causes and I have a multitude of spreadsheets detailing reasons given either for quitting or for a termination. Since that really didn’t tell me anything, I created a survey that should tell me a lot more about the actual reasons someone left. I have the metrics, but I don’t even know where to start to measure the causes. I have the Y’s and a boatload of X’s. Its those X’s I’m having trouble measuring.
    Jeff

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    #168348

    Snow
    Participant

    Jeff,
    It appears as if you are looking for rapid and significant change, where the solution (s) to your problem (s) is/are in the heads of the people who do the workΒ Β (ie no need to generate new knowledge).Β  If this desciption fits,Β perhaps a Work Out might be a better tool for you.Β  You could use a leadingΒ indicator as your project Y (ieΒ employee satisfaction – before/after) and then correlate it to theΒ lagging rate of attrition.Β  Using this method, you could run through a DMAIC/PDSA/Etc cycle in aboutΒ 2-3 weeks with a workable action plan.Β 
    Just a thought……Β 

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    #168351

    HF Chris
    Participant

    A couple of questions:
    1. If voluntarily leaving, where are these employees going…is it the competition with more money problem? You train then they take?
    2. If terminated why and what is the selection process to hire prior to the termination…..focusing on just retainment will filter out possible external systemic issues.
    3. Do you really know the causes now or just problems and complaints?
    Just something to think about. You can do a cluster analysis on the groupings of supervisor’s ownership, senior management’s ownership, and individual’s ownership to start with then perform an RCA from that point. If this raises some questions please let me know.
    HF Chris

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    #168358

    Jeff
    Participant

    Chris,
    To answer your 1 and 2, I have anecdotal data only at this point. I created an exit survey so that employees who are quittion or being terminated can provide some of this data. Even if a few respond to the survey, it will be better than what I have now. As for number 3, I will analyze the survey responses along with spreadsheets created by my HR people and try to see if what HR says regarding attrition is close to what employees are saying about reasons for leaving. If there is a huge difference, then we really have problems. Also, to go back to number 2, we administer a test that is supposed to indicate the liklihood of someone leaving the company within 30, 60, 90, and 180 days respectively. It is scored Low, Medium, High risk. We hire more Medium risks than Low risks as most people fall into the Medium risk category. What I see, though, is that we hire all Mediums, even if they are 1 point away from being a High risk, which we never hire. Something I thought of last night is to possibly rework the way we select those Medium risk people. The RCA is part of the plan; I’m just waiting for data. Thanks for the help.
    Jeff

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    #168362

    Anand
    Participant

    Hi Jeff
    In my opinion you should be following 2 pronged approach. As the attrition rate is very high, it should be plugged immediately. You should conduct a Kaizen event where you invite all the concerned people and brainstorm on the Quick fixes which can help to plug the flow for a short term. This time will give you the much needed time to follow other approach of detailed data analysis and identifying improvement actions which may have a big impact.
    Apart from exit interview, you should do a survey of the existing employees to find out the their satisfaction levels and the things that they are concerned about.
    Anand

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    #168364

    Jeff
    Participant

    Dude, Anand,
    We did a work out on the office that had the greatest costs due to attrition. The issue there was the HR person hired anyone who could speak English or Spanish. She administered no tests and rarely allowed these new hires to attend our standard training. Her attrition rate for new hires was around 75%. Once she was dealt with, the attrition rate in that office dropped dramatically. While there are probably more examples similar to this in other offices, my directive is to come up with a process that can be implemented throughout the company. I think an existing employee survey may provide some great insight. Thanks for the suggestions.
    Jeff

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    #168371

    HF Chris
    Participant

    Jeff,Stating that you “dealt” with the HR person who was not following the guidelines misses the point. Why was this allowed to happen and not audited? How do the HR employees know if they are successful? If it’s by attrition rate, it’s too late. That’s like measuring yourself for safety success against lagging indicators like lost time injuries and fatalities…it’s just too late. The employee was not the root cause she was a causal factor that led to poor selection and hiring. Think about it about, success can also be measured with improved production rates tied to leading hiring indicators. That might help morale and attrition.This is where cause and effect diagrams and brainstorming and even work out can lead you astray. You only repopulate your RCA with items you know about with your understanding of the current system. I forgot who said it, but thinking you’ll get a different result without changing your methods is insanity…something like that. Do a search for root cause analysis on the internet. You may find a program that could help you. There are some better than others but I don’t want to become an advertisement. If you would like, I can go deeper off-line if you give contact info. HF Chris

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    #168372

    Jeff
    Participant

    Chris,
    Feel free to mail me at [email protected]. Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. Even being able to throw mud and get feedback is better than I can get here.
    Your first paragraph is indeed a case of preaching to the choir. In my company, HR reps are measured only by how many employees stay. My admonition that this is flawed was met with deaft ears. I should have explained the rationale for the work out in my previous post. That manager was a problem, we knew she was a problem, but it was only after “promoting” her out of her position and then seeing the subsequent reduction in attrtion that management was allowed to remove her completely. They wanted immediate results and she was the resolution that proved the most expedient.
    I hope my surveys and analysis will result in a more accurate RCA. You are indeed correct regarding insanity. Unfortunatly, we have only recently gotten a senior leader who is willing to change methods and processes. That’s where I come in. We have long-tenured folk here and they are reluctant to change. We did, however, remove 25 such people a few months ago, and things are on the upswing.
    I look forward to discussing this further with you offline.
    Thanks,
    Jeff

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    #168674

    Big Al
    Participant

    Having read the trail of posts, some thoughts which might add to the analysis:
    a) You quote average rates of attrition – do the weekly/monthly highs, lows and trends (over multiple years?) tell you anything or provide insight into events linked to other things going on in the company?
    b) What is the definition of attrition and what does a 56% attrition rate really mean – 56 out of 100 staff leave each month or is it a rolling average?
    c)Β 44% of staff do not leave – what makes them stay?Β 
    d) Might be useful to consider stratifying the leavers’ data (period of service, gender, age, education, number of prior jobs, department, job type, weekly vs hourly paid, location etc).Β  Some of the distinctions could be quite sensitive and may even be deemed discriminatory if not properly handled, but it could help in identifying whether there is a prevalence in any particular area.
    e) What are the benchmark attrition rates for your industry and geographical area?
    A number of these tie in to the RCA work and predictive (leading) measures others wereΒ alluding to.
    Wish you much success.Β Β 

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    #168709

    George Chynoweth
    Participant

    IΒ’ve done this kind of study, and for exactly the same reason: high cost of turnover. It was Billion dollar company known for being Β“On Time and Under BudgetΒ”. They did it by burning out their salaried engineers. The best way to do this is conduct a phone survey of the folks who have left the company. Get names, addresses & phone #s for everyone who has left over the last year or so from HR (go back far enough so that you have a good size n). Send them a post card to let them know you will be calling them, when you will call, and why. (This will improve your response rate significantly.) Guarantee their anonymity. In your survey be sure to include a question about their immediate supervisor. Approximately 70% of terminations (voluntary & involuntary) are due to the employee-supervisor relationship. HR can provide you with good demographics: length of employment, position, and reason for leaving. Make an extra effort to get data from those with a longer length of employment, and higher levels of job position. The given reason for leaving will usually be benign (better pay, better opportunities, etc.) Β– folks donΒ’t want to burn their bridges behind them. So be sure to ask directly, after youΒ’ve established some rapport and reiterated the anonymity guarantee, why they left. Write down their responses verbatim, to include supervisor names if provided. Construct your survey as follows: Ask no more than 10 questions (e.g., Β“please rate your satisfaction with Β“ Β… supervision, salary, benefits, training opportunities, work site environment, mgmt policies, etc.). Use a 10-point rating scale Β– everyone understands this scale. A short questionnaire with an easy-to-use scale reduces respondent time & burden and will improve your response rate. One of the questions should be Overall Job Satisfaction Β– run a multiple regression against it to find the significant areas. Your last question, as you are getting ready to hang up, should be something like, Β“Is there anything else you think I should know?Β” Analyze the qualitative data looking for themes and grouping categories. Additionally, I advise against surveying the current employees. If there is a demoralized/repressive work environment you wonΒ’t get any meaningful data Β– they wonΒ’t trust you, and you may not be able to guarantee anonymity. It may also set up false expectations: what will you do with the results? You might even run a benchmark study against other companies in the same industry. I made a number of recommendations as a result of my data analyses, and 3 of them may apply to your situation, so here are the sort versions. 1. First line supervisors need training in employee supervision. 2. Split the recruitment/retention functions. HR retains recruitment, but supervisors are responsible for retention Β… this becomes part of their annual performance evaluation. 3. Outsource exit interviews for a year or so. Internal exit interviews, especially in a stressed environment, probably wonΒ’t yield valid data.This is a lot of work, but if youΒ’re losing $20M annually, it is doable.
    hth,george

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    #168716

    Jeff
    Participant

    Thank you all for your help and guidance on this. Now I really have a problem. One of our analysts sent me someΒ numbers that he said he obtained by using the BINOMDIST function in Excel. I’ll try to simplify, but here goes. Site A has an average monthly headcount of 78. In January they had 5 people leave. He inserted 5 in the Number_s field, 78 in Trials,Β Probability s of 0.05 and Cumulative true he sent me the result of 7.48323E-17, a very low number. I’m not even sure if the function is set up correctly. What am I missing???
    Β 

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    #168719

    SiggySig
    Member

    Jeff, is this meant to get a prediction of how many people will leave in a month? Not sure this is the formula to use. Whether an employee stays or goes isn’t really a “trial” as far as this is concerned.I remember running a similar project, and being asked to annualize savings numbers post improvement. Since it was all based on how many people we hired in the coming year, I had no real way of predicting that. It’s a fairly random event. So I made a prediction based on the past – probably wrong, as most predictions are.Out of curiosity, have you plotted your attrition on a control chart? If so, what did you find?

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    #168720

    Jeff
    Participant

    I’m not sure what it’s supposed to show. I haven’t plotted anything yet. We really haven’t started getting into the meat of the matter either. I think what the analyst wants is to check for variance among the 35 sites. I’m really not sure, which is why I posted my somewhat senseless query. I know all of our sites have high attrition, but I’m not sure how to compare them yet to account for the different sample sizes and other variables.

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    #168721

    Deanb
    Participant

    I do not know if this is what you need, but I recall spending time in the mid 90’s with Markov Processes, which is a mathematical method that estimates the impact of incremental attrition changes (among competitors) on market share given infinite trials.It is used in marketing research and decision support to predict where a player must dominate to survive. When I think of attrition analysis, this is what I immediately think of.Some mathematical softwares offer this method. Here is a link FYI: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markov_decision_processWe used Management Scientist. I see the version 6.0 is available at Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/Management-Scientist-Version-6-0/dp/0324191332

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    #168725

    George Chynoweth
    Participant

    No, you do not Β“really have a problemΒ”. Why would your analyst use the Binomial Distribution test? IΒ’m guessing out of ignorance. DonΒ’t run analyses if you donΒ’t understand their requirements, assumptions, or outcomes. More than likely, the Excel macro figured 78 trials with 5 reversals, which would indeed yield an extremely low number. This is equivalent to tossing a coin 78 times and getting tails 73 times and heads 5 times Β– whatΒ’s the probability of that?. This analysis, for this problem, makes no sense. Go forward with the good advice youΒ’ve gotten from the forum.george

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    #168729

    aryan
    Participant

    I went through the subject discussion as wanted to prepare myself a meeting on how to control attrition rate , my good luck that thro google search could get hold to this discussion. Not that I learnt many new things but lot of my belief and convictions and knowledge got confidence that I will be contributing positively in the meeting to solve the issue rather than going there as a blank face. this is a learning discussion. will let you know the details once through with the meeting

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    #168733

    Deanb
    Participant

    George,Outstanding post.When management gets out of touch with its market on a large scale (its employees in this case), a comprehensive investment in new info and management processes is usually in order. Many start by looking for the easy fixes, which rarely do much good. I have seen this “out of touch” problem in many different forms, and it usually results in doing just what you did in your case example. The key is to recognize this problem type early in the Problem ID stage and avoid wasting time attempting baby fixes that can veer an organization even further off-target. For best results, once identified, the CEO needs to champion the project, and then personally oversee the new system post fix until it becomes stable.

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    #168736

    SiggySig
    Member

    If your analyst is trying to understand if there is a difference in attrition rate across sites, that’s a different story. Proportion testing can help with that. Dean’s suggestion is more robust for sure, but running a chi-square will help analyze the variation across sites.Good luck…

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    #168738

    Jeff
    Participant

    Wow. I never thought I’d get as much input on this subject. I’m glad someone mentioned that the binomial distribution made no sense here. I’m not a statistical guru, but it made no sense to me either. Much of what I thought has been reiterated in the thread somewhere. Maybe this will help. I have to look at 3 divisions spread across 35 locations the US and Canada, encompassing roughly 10,000 current employees. Last year we lost over 11,000 employees. We have a problem, but the monthly average of attrition across all sites is consistent with the industry and sits close to 8%. While this seems low, it is huge for us. I now have been mandated with figuring out what site or division to start working on first. Only after that is done can I formulate my problem statement. And then only after conducting my initial research. We are a company firmly entrenched in the past and change comes slowly. This is a big project for me and I feel a bit overwhelmed. I figured a chi-square analysis could help. Are there any other suggestions for how to analyze this data besides what has already been mentioned in the thread?
    Thanks again for all of the fine posts. I’m getting help from across the world and am appreciative of all of it.
    Jeff

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    #168741

    Deanb
    Participant

    Jeff,The Chi Sq analysis will help you rank and target the worst sites, however it may be just as valuable to use this to discover if this is a systemic issue, or just localized in a few key locations. This determination has a major influence on how the project gets scoped.If systemic, you will need a system wide solution, deployed locally. Finally, you need to have your CFO fix a dollar amount to the loss function of attrition. If one is not available, developing that is also a first necessity. You might find that losses start accruing after 5%, 10% or after 2%. That should set the acceptable attrition level, not industry averages.good luck.

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    #168743

    George Chynoweth
    Participant

    Thanks Dean. Agree – If the CEO or president (a senior VP will not do) is not solidly behind this kind of effort it will go to waste. Even well-defined problems with well-defined and actionable solutions will be ignored. The Β“old guardΒ” is particularly entrenched and vested in Β“traditionΒ”. Moving on Β… Another thing Jeff can do is find the best and worst work sites, in terms of attrition rates, via the Chi-square. IFF there is a substantial difference between the two he can run a comparison study. Conduct an employee survey at the best work site, and, using the same survey, interview the former employees from the worst site. The differences may suggest specific problem areas, or at a minimum help to define the problem and the project, leading to better approaches & analyses.

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    #168757

    KKN
    Participant

    Jeff,
    Β  Have you looked at attrition rate across diffenent attributes than site (Age, Race, Level in Organization, Time in Company,…)Β  Last year a Greenbelt in our company was working on a simular project and was going down the road of multiple surveys.Β  I had her put the people leaving in time in company buckets and found a significant timeframe where people were leaving the company (ie, people were leaving in month 4, 5, and 6 MUCH higher than any other month).Β  We layed timelines of what was happening to employees around that period and found a particular process to work on (in this case, a change in compensation occured when they were in this time frame, causing a dip in pay).Β  We smoothed out the compensation, without any financial hit to the company and halved our attrition rate.

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    #168766

    Jeff
    Participant

    About the Chi-Square test: Say I have 10 offices in a division and I determine that there is a significant difference in their observed attrition level percentages, which I know there is from running the numbers. Is it simply a matter of sorting those percentages from largest to smallest to see which is doing the best and worst? I think I may be underthinking or overthinking the whole chi-square thing as the case may be.

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    #168797

    Jeff
    Participant

    About the Chi-Square test: Say I have 10 offices in a division and I determine that there is a significant difference in their observed attrition level percentages, which I know there is from running the numbers. Is it simply a matter of sorting those percentages from largest to smallest to see which is doing the best and worst? I think I may be underthinking or overthinking the whole chi-square thing as the case may be.

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    #168798

    Jeff
    Participant

    Yep, sort the results of the Chi-Square. I was really overthinking that one. I was not simplifying the logic for a one dimensional chi-square, which is what I need to use for each of my divisions. The 3 category test came out fine.

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    #168808

    Swaggerty
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,
    im a late comer, to this forum, so excuse me. A couple of minor questions..
    1. What is the current attrition rate in your industry?
    2.Is your compensation on par, or below industry standards?
    3.Since when have you been experiencing significantly high attritions?
    George

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    #168822

    Jeff
    Participant

    George,
    I only have date for the last 3 years, and attrtion has been high according to that data. Before that, they did not keep such figures. As I have said, there are some entrenched people here and hight attrition rates does not fit in well with the plan. Industry standards for monthly attrition are around 7%. Many of my sites are way above that. Pay and benefits are on par. The reason that this has not been a concern is due to a flaw in the way exectuives look at the sites. Managers are rewarded based on total dollar amount that they bring in, not profit. For instance, I have a manager whose operation consistently brings in around $175,000 a month, but she loses on average of 50 people a month. The financial impact of the 50 losses is not calculated. Or should I say, it was not ever calculated. The figure we attribute as cost to hire is very low. We calculate only hard dollars and not what it costs to replace, train, loss of prodcutivity, etc. We have a huge problem and we now have an executive in charge who wants it fixed.

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    #168823

    Jeff
    Participant

    I’ve run the Chi-Square test on my data for 13 of my sites. They show that there is a difference in attrition among my sites. What I’d like to do now is to see how far off from I want my attrition level to be those numbers are. Can I insert my desired numbers in place of expected numbers to get the results I’m looking for? My MBB says I can, but I don’t see how to do this since my observed values and expected(desired) won’t Sum the same. He wants these numbers for the goodness of fit and not the test for independence.

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    #168841

    Swaggerty
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,
    Amongst all the mails that u’ve been flooded with, one really got my attention, ie, surveying the people who have already left (anonymous survey). the easiest way would be to take the data ( total no of people who have left ur company over the last 3 years).
    Host the survey on a separate page, and call/email your ex-employees requesting them to fill it up.
    Assuming 10% of your ex-employees respond, you have some valuable data, which can be analyzed further.
    Another suggestion would be to include an option so that people can select whether they belong to senior, middle, or junior management.
    On a proactive note, I’d suggest designing a survey for existing employees, asking them what they like best about the company, what they are looking for, and what they would like to change the most.
    Of course, @ all levels, it must be stressed that this data is highly confidential
    Once you have the root cause of attrition in your hand, life ought to be a bit easier.
    hope this helps
    George

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    #168844

    Manu G
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,
    i completed a project on attrition with 60% attrition reduction, sustained for 8 months before we closed the project.
    I can share some highlights and you can see how much it relates to you. If you need further help/info we can discuss.
    i work in a bpo and we have high attrition in voice processes.
    when we tried to drill down attrition from processwise, gender wise, distance to work wise, education wise, we could not establish a good causal relation. However when we looked from age perspective, we could see that very young people in the age group of 19- 23 years are the one attriting the most. we also found that majority of attrition happens during first 90 days of operations, where we scoped our project. Almost 55% attrition in first 90 days.
    We surveyed employees who have left the organization and new hires to understand their grievances and reasons of leaving.
    The typicalΒ Xs that came forward were –
    – some people who had multiple offer letters were attriting after day 1 (induction)
    -training process/trainer had infuence on how well Β the person completes the training without attriting
    – initial period post training is again crucial as this is the time when the person requires handholding. Young people coming into a bpo sometimes are scared of the environment until they are properly handled and their grievances are addressed.
    We identified solutions which were more people oriented and psychological. The attrition is more ofΒ  a human psychology based concern and getting down the key root causesΒ of their grievances is important.
    Once the attrition factors are known, a sustainable Β process (data driven t measure performance on these Xs)to counter these needs to be implemented.
    Manu

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    #168865

    Jeff
    Participant

    George,
    Thank you for your suggestions. I have already designed a survey for existing employees and we will be rolling that out as part of the project. I would like to survey former employees, but obtaining that information is a sore point in my company for various reasons.
    Manu,
    If you wouldn’t mind, please e-mail me at [email protected]. I have a couple of questions for you. I think I’m heading down the right track, but additional information would be helpful. We are a textbook case of 80/20 here. Almost to the number, 20% of my sites have 80% of the attrits. I’m anxious to see what else I find as I continue to analyze the attritition data I’m compiling.
    Thanks to you both for your input,
    Jeff

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    #168930

    Manu Gautam
    Participant

    Jeff,
    my e-mail id is [email protected]
    Re the project metrics, i hope you have defined it by now.
    Since i scoped the project w.r.t tenure, the metrics used was “% of volunatary attrition within 90 days of joining”.
    Cheers!
    Manu Gautam

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    #169919

    Jeff
    Participant

    After some research and discussion, I have narrowed my focus to two of my centers. The project goal is to reduce total annualized attrition for these two centers from 166%, which is what it was for 2007 to 49% for 2008. I know this sounds high, but for the type of business we operate, this is the industry average for annualized attrition. We want to at least get to the average, sigma level notwithstanding. The areas giving us the most trouble are voluntary terminations under 30 days, which is the initial training period and job abandonments under 60 days, which is the initial probationary period. Of course the overall metric is Attrition, but these two metrics are driving almost 85% of the annualized attrition rate. Does anyone have any input on this? Do these seem like good measures? We finally have a BB consultant, but her assistance has been lacking in this matter. Any advice would be appreciated.

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    #169923

    BTDT
    Participant

    Jeff:I tried looking for a project I saw a while ago, but couldn’t find it. In essence HR did all the exit interviews and stuff with all the problems of reliability, etc. etc. and found the majority of people who left, left fairly soon after starting.People, especially newcomers to the industry, failed to really figure out what they were signing up for. After they worked for a bit and their eyes were opened, they decided that this was not the job for them, and left.HR began a program of very brief “on-the-job” type orientations for new candidates and got a commitment before they started on training. These orientations involved shadowing a present employee for a day or so. Even though a fair number never signed up after the orientation, those who made an informed choice about the job tended to stay longer.Cheers, Alastair

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    #170765

    G
    Member

    send me

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    #170764

    G
    Member

    send me

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    #171610

    Zalki
    Participant

    develop proper work environment

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    #171614

    Jeff
    Participant

    Jackson,
    In one of the centers we found that the work environment was more conducive to a slumber party than a professional workplace. We surveyed the employees and found that they actually liked the decorative aspects of the office. We removed the decoration anyway. Amazingly enough, we began receiving feedback that the employees were dressing professionally again, there has been less downtime, and the number of complaints to HR has dropped quite a bit. It’s only been a few weeks, but making the environment look like a place to do a job as opposed to having a party seems to have some positive outcomes. We’ve noticed the absentee rate has gone down some as well.
    Jeff

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    #171925

    mystica
    Participant

    Hi manu
    Would like to understand your project more and in detail. Do give me your email details
    Β 
    Regards
    Mystica

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    #174194

    AKC
    Participant

    Hi Jeff!
    I was searcing for info on how to approach a attrition reduction project and that is where i found this , very interesting thread of yours. I am keen to know the final approach taken, results achieved and learnings/ recommendations that you might want to share with the group.
    AKC

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