iSixSigma

BB certification

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General BB certification

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #34526

    indresh
    Participant

    Dear All,
    Am currenlty working as a BB and have undergone the 10 days BB wave 1 and wave 2 as they call it training on six sigma methodologies conducted by GE.
    After that have completed 2 BB projects and have mentored 11 GB projects. I still feel the need to get the basics stronger
    would anybody help me in identifying some good books that i should read and moreover would also be interested in knowing global acceptance of ASQ certification
    rgds,
    indresh

    0
    #95267

    Cone
    Participant

    ASQ’s certification is proof of nothing. Anyone can qualify if you word affidavids correctly. Anyone can pass with the right prep material. Doesn’t mean you can do a thing.
    To strengthen capability go take some real stats and DOE courses. Go study project management and understand what to do with knowledge sharing tools such as FMEA. Try to prioritize tools by what you have found useful and what you only go through the motions on. Put a post out here about the going through the motion tools and people will enlighten you as to usefulness if it indeed exists.

    0
    #95285

    Martínez
    Participant

    ASQ is seen as jumping on board with 6 sigma after fighting the concept for the longest time. It does not have, in my opinion, positive value in the market, and I wouldn’t pay for it.

    0
    #95296

    indresh
    Participant

    i had asked for credibility of ASQ certification and a friend of mine wrote the following
    “Put a post out here about the going through the motion tools and people will enlighten you as to usefulness if it indeed exists.”
    need you guys to throw some light on the above. BAsic purpose is to have solid foundation of concepts, any sources, books, courses to do that
    if you can write them in detail this friend of yours would be obliged
    rgds

    0
    #95306

    Robert Butler
    Participant

      As you have noted – two weeks of statistics training means that you have come away with something less than two weeks understanding of the subject.  To give yourself a better understanding of the statistics side of Six Sigma I’d recommend the following books as an absolute minimum both from the standpoint of reference and furthering your education:
    1. The Cartoon Guide to Statistics – Gonick & Smith – a very nice overview of general statistical concepts backed up with excellent examples of concept usage.
    2. Applied Regression Analysis – Draper and Smith – everything you ever wanted to know about regression and in a very readable form.  A careful reading of the first few chapters will help you understand just how wrong so many of the concepts you thought you were taught (but really weren’t) actually are.
    3. Statistical Methods – Snedecor and Cochran and/or Statistical Theory and Methodology in Science and Engineering – Brownlee.  These two books give a good solid explanation of basic statistical theory.  The first tends to be more focused on boiler plate than the second but the second has excellent explanations of many of the basic concepts that you had to take on faith when you were rushing through your BB training.
    4. Fundamental Concepts in the Design of Experiments – Hicks – just a good old plain vanilla explanation of basic experimental design.  This will not cover mixtures or computer generated (optimal) design but I have found it to be a well written book. Read it and do the problems at the end of each chapter and you will have learned a great deal.
    5. Quality Control and Industrial Statistics – Duncan – I think it is the best single volume book on the subject around. Well written, readable, and my first choice when I need to look up something in this area.
    6. Measuring Process Capability – Bothe – An exhaustive assessment of this issue. Covers all of the usual Cpk material as well as the issues of non-normality, unilateral tolerances.  I haven’t read the entire book but anytime I run across something in the literature pertaining to process capability and I have a question I head straight to Bothe and I have always been able to find the answer buried in its pages.
    7. The Visual Display of Quantitative Information – Tufte – The best discussion of do’s and dont’s of graphical analysis and graphical presentation that I have ever seen.  I have read this book and its companions – Visual Explanations and Envisioning Information  – many times.  I refer to this book every time I get ready to make a graphical presentation. 
      His other two books are equally powerful. The section in Envisioning Information on the Challenger disaster drives home, as nothing else I have ever read, the power and importance of clear thinking about a problem and the power that appropriate graphical presentation of data could have had.
    8. Quality, Productivity, and competitive Position – Deming.  While there are some aspects of the book that are a bit dry and may seem somewhat dated, Deming was doing Six Sigma long before it was called that and his case studies are first rate examples of what you would want to strive for when analyzing and solving problems.
    9. The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty before 1900 – Stigler. A very readable look at statistic’s roots.  While not a technical book in the sense of learning new tools it does give you a historical perspective of the whole issue of variation.  I enjoy books like this because they give you a sense of where all of this stuff came from and what people did before they had the tools that you now take for granted.

    0
    #95312

    Cone
    Participant

    Wow – talk about a blast from the part – the Hicks book?
     The sum of the sum of  x sub dot j k – haven’t done that in a while (thank you Minitab)
    You must really want to torture these folks.
    On the serious side, I learned from Hicks (the book and the person) back in 1976. None better. I only regret is we spent way to much effort on the mechanics of the analysis and did not come away wtih a complete understanding of the beauty of the designs.

    0
    #95318

    Robert Butler
    Participant

      I’m glad I brought back some (fond?) memories with the Hicks book.
      :)
      Actually, you bring up a point that I meant to make in the first post – books and computers. It is particularly applicable to the Hicks book.  As you noted it is old, however, if you use it in conjunction with a package such as Minitab you will have the best of both worlds.  In the past I’ve copied various chapters from the Hicks book for my engineers and I’ve told them to sit down and, using their computer, work the worked problems in the book.  By reading the text and looking at the computer output they not only gain an understanding the the mechanics of design they also gain a lot of understanding of what the computer program is doing for them.
      The other thing they can do is accurately simulate those all too often real life cases where one of the horses dies. i.e. they take the book problem, run it, and then set one or more of the book outputs to missing and re-run the problem on the computer and see how the dead horse impacts the final answer.  I’ve used this method to really drive home the robust nature of design as opposed to one-at-a-time.
      Since I’m always on the lookout for a good book – do you have any recommendations for a more modern book with the same kind of basic content and simple worked problems as Hicks?

    0
    #95321

    Cone
    Participant

    I like Hicks and Box, Hunter, and Hunter. I think Montgomery’s and Wheeler’s contributions are quite good as well. I like Taguchi’s Quality Engineering and I like Deming’s Q, P, and the CP (another blast from the past in your list).
    Just for a frame of reference, I think all of the Six Sigma focused books are trivial, except I think Breyfogle made a step toward a Juran type contribution with his ISS. Before I get slammed with posts, I have read most of them (>25) and some are better than others, but I think change agents (BB’s) and champions get more from Good to Great or Adhocracy than any of the rah rah Six Sigma is the way and the light books.

    0
    #95323

    Cindy
    Participant

    Thanks for your take on so many books –
    I think I’ll suggest to isixsigma that they add a book reveiw to their website –
    it would be nice to see what folks in the real world have to say about a book – before purchasing
     
     

    0
    #95329

    Marz
    Participant

    I would recommend reading Built to Last before Good to Great.

    0
    #95342

    indresh
    Participant

    thanks to all,
    well had started with some of them already metioned as favorites by all
    thats validation of being on the right track to be expert like you all SOME DAY…..
    thanks again

    0
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.