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Cause and Effect matrix (not Ishikawa)

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  • #42807

    Elbrin
    Participant

    During my initial training I was shown a tool which was called a cause and effects matrix. This was used to compare customer requirements with process steps, and identify if the process aligned with customer requirements.
    However I have not seen this tool used by black belts which received their training elsewhere, and when I show it to them they tend to call it a QFD.  It does resemble a QFD is some ways but is not as robust nor is it used the same way as a QFD.  Does anyone else use this tool, perhaps by another name?

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    #135316

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    Yes, the C&E Matrix is widely used and is an important part of the DMAIC process.  Yes, QFD uses a series of cascading “cause and effect matrices” which attempt to identify the relationship between some x’s and some y’s.  The real challenge to the tool is the somewhat subjective nature of the correlation despite the fact that numbers are used and calculations are made.  If a BB has never heard of the tool, then I would be a little concerned about any advice that they would give you.

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    #135320

    Elbrin
    Participant

    Yes,  that is exactly as I have used it in the past.  I usually mitigate the subjectivity by using a varied group of SMEs when drafting the C&E.  However after recently switching companys I have found noone which uses the C&E matrix at my new company.
    I also perfer to create process maps which list inputs and outputs and then classify those inputs as noise, sop, or controlable, and identify which are ciritical.  All of their P-Maps are in swim lanes and identiy no inputs or outputs.

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    #135328

    Chicagoan
    Participant

    I’ve used C&E matrix with great success in problem solving meetings. This works great particularly when team members with strong personalities are involved in root cause analysis meetings.

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    #135511

    Chua Kwan Teng
    Participant

    Dear ElbrinI agreed with you. I have been conducting BB training and I always insists that my particpiants use this tool. The Cause and Effect Matrix is a powerful but simple tool to align Significant Process Inputs with Customer requirements and also a method to rate its importance so that the KPIVs could be filter out.My BB either miss its “beauty” or has not been able to realize its potential. I found it a very essential tool.It is different from QFD as CE Matrix focus towards the process. a lot of BB even use QFD wrongly.Thanks and regardsChua Kwan Teng

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    #135543

    Jonathon
    Participant

    Darth:Right on, as usual. I also want to add: whether it’s full-blown QFD, or just the C-E Matrix component, your decision is only as good as your ability to prioritize requirements correctly.

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    #138296

    Dwivedi
    Participant

    cause and effect matrix is a very good tool to analyse a process.We can use it in several ways.I am using this tool before preparing the PFMEA.it is helping a lot.

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    #141817

    Daniel Bupp
    Participant

    Yes, we are actually helping a health system that is going to be shown this tool. I’ve also seen it called a Customer Prioritzation Table in the Sailing Through Six Sigma eBook by Brassard and Ritter…the authors of the Memory Jogger Series

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    #141840

    Rick Buchman
    Member

    All,
    Companies that have incorporated the training materials by SBTI strongly emphasize the use of this tool during the early steps of the DMAIC, specifically in the measure phase right after mapping the process.  The key is that it develops an understanding of both the risks of failure of key process steps in fulfilling key customer requirements, and where key opportunities arose to dramatically and positively impact those requirements as well. 
    The C&E Matrix is not advocated nor taught in other curriculums, for a variety of reasons, primarily due to the inherent potential complexity of the matrix, and a need for profound familiarity by teh team with the product and process to truly assess which step can impact the customer requirements, and to what degree.  However, when properly applied, it is a very powerful and useful tool, and can help especially with more subjective, complex and/or transactional processes.

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    #164508

    Shallan Rhea
    Member

    I have a question. Is the advanced prioritzation matrix also called the cause/effect? I’m a little confused. I need to write a one page paper on compare and contrast on the APM or the force field analysis. FFA.
    Also I have to explain problems and solutions where either one would be useful and what kinds of problems/solutions it would not be useful in solving. Anyone got any tips?
    Thank You,
    Shallan

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    #171440

    William Hovey
    Member

    As a Master Black Belt, I have taught this tool often and I myself have used it. Yes it is similar to a QFD in that it is a relationship matrix, but that is pretty much where the similarity stops. A QFD is a process of assessing customers needs against products or services developed using a series of relationship matrices. When a single matrix is used to assess a cause versus and effect or a process outcome(Y) versus a potential driver (X) of that outcome, these matricies are called Cause and Effect Matrix or X, Y Matrix.
    I hope that helps clarify.
    Bill Hovey

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    #171453

    benjammin0341
    Participant

    Well said Bill.
    On a seperate note, to eliminate some confusion in a previous thread, a C&E Matrix and X Prioritization Matrix are basically the same thing and serve the same purpose. The only significant difference you will find is in the title.

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