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  • #45903

    Steve Bonacorsi
    Member

    Isn’t Lean Six Sigma a Change Management approach?
    Do we need further change management techniques built into the methodology to truly effect lasting change?
    What are others thoughts?
    Steven Bonacorsi
    MBB, Director

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    #150923

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    There are the “hard skills” you teach in class and then there are the “soft skills” which a person either has or can be learnt to gain success either in their projects or culturally.  In my experience the Lean Experts/Masters or BB/MBBs that are trully successful have a solid mix of both.  Change management if used well is a solid road map of understanding needs, defining opportunities, appropriate communication etc etc and driving change in a planned way. 
    I guess we could write books on this subject.
    Regards,
    Adam
     

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    #150926

    qualitycolorado
    Participant

    Regarding the topic “do we need further change management techniques built into the methodology to truly effect lasting change “:
     
    I have been working in process and quality improvement for more years than I care to admit to. I have experienced successes, as well as a few less-than-fully-successful efforts.
    In my experiences with Six Sigma, Lean, simple PDCA, etc., it has not been the “technical” side of the effort that is most prone to failure; it is the people side (change management, change leadership).
    Most articles that discuss the failures of Six Sigma (or Lean, or TQM, etc) tend to neglect this, or give it only minor notice (and few effective recommendations).  Also, most Six Sigma training that I have seen gives very little attention to effective change leadership.  Most Six Sigma training leans heavily on the “hard” skills (statistics, DOE, etc.).
    As Adam noted in his reply, effective Six Sigma practitioners have a balanced blend  both the “hard” and “soft” sides skills.
     
    I highly recommend that all Six Sigma Black Belts, Green Belts, Champions, etc. (and Lean Masters, TQM practitioners, and all our other process improvement kin) immerse themselves in the better information out there about change management and change leadership.
     
    Several books by John Kotter are very good (“Leading Change”, “The Heart of Change” and “The Heart of Change Field Guide”).
     
    Additionally, the Change Management Leadership Center (http://www.change-management.com/webinars.htm) has some terrific information, including a highly-informative (and free!) webinar series and several very good tutorials.
     
     
    Best regards,
    QualityColorado

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    #150934

    SS foundation
    Member

    QualityColorado,
     
    While I agree with you, I also think that the idea that Six Sigma needs to somehow “integrate” change management into its methodology points to a few core limitations of six sigma and the way it is being deployed that six sigma as it is currently being practiced cannot address:
     
    The core underlying business assumption is that a company creates competitive advantage by delivering defect-free products and services. VOC is used to determine the CTQ and requirements and the various methodologies are used to (a) improve an existing process (DMAIC), (b) reduce waste (Lean DMAIC) or design new products/services (DFSS). The deployment plan is then developed to identify the best project opportunities and through training etc. reach the goals set by the organization.
     
    While this may be a somewhat simplified summary of six sigma, there are a few problems with this underlying model (that Six Sigma shares with TQM):
     

    The model does not account for changes in the competitive environment of the organization due to restructuring of the industry (alliance structures, new entrants etc.) or active changes in the strategies and strategic postures of the organization. As a matter of fact, Six Sigma assumes a stable environment where customer demand can be identified. It does not assume that customer demand or the industry can be shaped. Even DFSS is highly passive in its way of “identifying” core needs and translating them into products/services. Moreover, it assumes that customer needs can be segmented. Even this market segmentation assumption is currently being questioned by the marketing profession.
    The deployment plans are relatively static and goals/metrics oriented: Train x% of BBs, each project has to have a savings of X$ if it is a GB project or Y$ if it is a BB project, every employee at grade level z needs to complete x amounts of projects etc. This in itself creates six sigma’s own constraints in terms of its lack of flexibility to adapt to changes both in the organization and in the environment. Deming pointed out quite correctly that if you give management a specific metric to achieve, it will achieve it … at all costs.
     
    My key point here is, is that even with the current “craze” about the “integration” of change management, knowledge management, or growth management systems into six sigma, the core of six sigma rests on a foundation that makes it successful only in situations where its assumptions hold. Unfortunately, we see a lot of discussion of assumptions on statistical tools and methodology, but very little about the assumptions about the business philosophy of six sigma. I think that this discussion is long overdue because six sigma is in the process of reaching a level of maturity where it cannot simply ignore its own foundation and sell a product that has clear potentials, but also limitations. So far, six sigma has gotten away with incorporating more and more improvement methods into its DMAIC framework. The foundation of six sigma has not changed, and I have currently reviewed some business books starting with the mid-90s which show a remarkable uniformity in discussing the business philosophy of Six Sigma. I think it is time to review those assumptions (and give the t-test, the p-chart and the gage study a little break).  

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    #150944

    Darth
    Participant

    Unfortunately, much of the change management literature deals with organizational change and broad sweep strategies.  True organizational change occurs one person at a time.  Although the concept of reinforcement is described in passing, there is insufficient effort being undertaken to understand why people do what they do or why they don’t do what we would like them to do.  Taking change management down to the individual level is what will cause broader change in the long run.  And it is more than platitudes of “create an environment for them” or “we need to motivate them better”.  Real analysis needs to be done why people are resistant to change.

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    #150958

    Charles H
    Participant

    I agree with this and other posts stating this is the great black hole of CI initiatives.  As others have said, the “soft” skills are the truly hard ones, and they are the most frequent causes for failures in CI. 
    At the TQM Seminar for Aerospace and Defense in 1992 (San Diego) Drucker said that he disagreed that people are naturally resistant to change, that they are one of the most adaptable creatures on earth.  He said that they resist change that they don’t understand the need for and that they are not a part of (having it rammed down their throats by the “we’re here to help” crowd).

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    #150968

    BTDT
    Participant

    Charles H:I started off as the technical expert in this field. I have learned over the years that the change part is the most critical. It is important at the level of:- corporate culture change.- project team and process change.- individual learning and maturing as a change agent.Depending on your role in the Six Sigma program, you should be deeply involved in at least one of the above. I spend a great deal of time on it, seemingly too much sometimes. I have learned how to walk away from projects that look pretty attractive from the technical side, but are a disaster on the team side. GRPI is a great diagnostic tool.https://www.isixsigma.com/forum/showmessage.asp?messageID=89231https://www.isixsigma.com/forum/showmessage.asp?messageID=79641Cheers, BTDT

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    #150972

    PJ
    Participant

    Bottom line Results-ROI for all state holders-What ever works for the situation. Picking the right tool for the right situation at the right time.
    People are often the weekest link-ever feel the deflation after coming back from an improvement seminar and try to get people do things a little different.-So many labels-does that not limit the options just by itself.Use the tools that fit and work in the type of situation you are in.

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    #150975

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Steve,
    We had a contract with a company who had been doing SS for 3 years using a Change Management company that decided they would consult in SS. When we started to review projects we found a couple interesting points. The training material addressed all the tools taught normally in a SS program but it did it in 3.5 days – consequently there was no understanding of the analysis tools. The other 4 weeks were spent teaching change management. The second thing we found was that the average project cycletime was 355 days (in other words projects slammed closed just before the end of each fiscal year). The third thing we faound was when you looked at project activity it was high for about 60 days and then slowed way down.
    Basically what was happening was that for about 60 days they would do lots of change management activities and so everyone was prepared to change. Unless it was a simple known solution the project would stall because the belts didn’t have much in the way of data analysis skills so they were ready to change but struggled with what need to change or what it need to change to. They got pressure at the end of the year to close projects so they used whatever brainstorming idea showed up.
    We retrained everyone spending 1 week on DMA and 1 week on IC. We followed up with lots of site support. The cycle time was under 120 days the following year (we dropped about half the Black Belts out of the program) and the savings was about 4X what it was the previous year.
    It goes back to Adam’s post – it takes hard and soft skills. It also takes a better understanding of change management than having some idiot stand up in front of a class and tell them change is hard. They know that – that comment doesn’t help. The organization also has to create an environment and an infrastructure to support change. If you can get to a company called Becton Dickenson (New Jersey) and find a woman named Val Larson you might be able to convince her to explain what she calls “sticky change” and how she uses 7 anchors to make it last.
    Just my opinion.
    Good luck

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    #150980

    CM
    Participant

    Mike,
    Interesting how your one case review of project turnaround time compares to every SS company that I have reviewed in the past: Projects get done at the end of the year to make the goal. So, there must be a little more to it than just “an iditiot” standing in front of the class telling everyone how difficult change is. So, I guess it is “Just your opinion”.

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    #150982

    Ashman
    Member

    Dilbert has a lovely sequel to his send up on Lean-Six Sigma, where he points out it is a waste of time.

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    #150983

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    And what, may I ask, makes Scott Adams an expert on Lean and/or Six Sigma?  Dilbert got its start when Adams would do his drawings during meetings at Pac Bell, wasting his employer’s time and money.  Not exactly what I would call an “expert” on the subject of process improvement.  I would take Dibert for what it is – a humorous view of current events in business – not as the final “informed” word on it.

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    #150984

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    You obviously don’t read with much comprehension.

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    #150985

    CM
    Participant

    Mike,
    Before I read your first post in this thread, I thought you were a man who had an intellect that was characterized by integrity and agility. Your two recent posts by contrast express an embarrasing parochialism, self-aggrandizement and lack of professionalism: The word “idiot” to describe a rival consultant by a well-known consultant like youself demonstrates that your communication style is after all not any better than those who would normally not be selected for GB and BB assignments just for those reasons. Your bragging about the “# of BB let go” are simply bad taste. Let’s face it you have lost a tremendous amount of stature and authority on this site in matters of serious discussions about the underlying concept and deployment of Six Sigma (You have never been a technical expert and to your own credit never pretended to be one). And you have definitely lost a voice that would recommend you as a professional to others. Cheers.

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    #150987

    Mikel
    Member

    Mike,
    I just finished Harvey’s book. It tracks much better to my exerience than anything else I’ve read.
    Have you read any of his recommended reading?

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    #150988

    Mikel
    Member

    CM,
    What I see here is a guy trying to help (Mike) and an idiot (CM) just taking shots at him.
    I did not take the time to figure out where you think Mike used the the word “idiot” but he does not do that casually so I susect he is right. If he used it with regards to you, I know he is right.
    If you want to take shots, take them at me. I see no contribution from you.

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    #150989

    CM
    Participant

    CM,
    I’m not sure why you would be so critical of MC sharing one experience.  Keep in mind these are quick posts done on a voluntary basis either in between VA (hopefully, LOL) work or our personal time.
    I don’t think sharing one story makes it just an opinion.  I have never seen anyone give a whole treatise in this forum. 
    A well told story is more powerful than most books.  It’s the reason why the well told stories are appreciated in books entitled “The Goal” or “Leaning into Six Sigma”.
    Just one voice of reason in the wilderness……. :)

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    #150990

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    CM,
    I have difficulty accepting your comment about MC’s last post.  Why criticize his telling of a story he experienced and call it just an opinion?
    In this environment where people are taking time out of their personal time or in between VA (hopefully) work, they are posting comments.  I don’t see any treatises posted.
    I would say that a powerfully shared SINGLE story is more impactful than most  books or white papers.  That is why the most popular reading is “The Goal” and “Leaning into Six Sigma” since they tell good stories.
    Just one voice of reason from the wilderness…..  Let’s keep the stories coming!

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    #150991

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    CM,
    Sorry for posting under your initials earlier…I had user error using the equipment over here at my clients different continent. :) 
    I wish isixsigma had the option to withdraw a post somehow….using the email as the password for identifying the original poster somehow.

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    #150992

    E T
    Participant

    Political cartoons such as Dilbert, present the truth that everyone knows but fools like you are afraid to admit.
    Dilbert’s six sigma and Lean series is painfully accurate.

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    #150993

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Stan,
    Between the title and the dog story it is a difficult book to resist.
    I haven’t read anything else but I am headed to South Africa so there wil be another one for the plane.
    Regards 

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    #150994

    Mikel
    Member

    I’ll send the note about Marty I promised.

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    #150995

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    CM,
    You are getting pretty emotional and maybe that is affecting your abilty to comprehend some pretty basic concepts.
    First nobody was bragging about dropping BB’s out of the program – nothing like throwing in a little emotionally charged language to make a point that isn’t there. It is simply going slower to go faster. When you load a program with to many BB’s then you stress the organization in two ways. They have to generate enough ideas and turn those to projects to support the larger number of BB’s. Considering that project selection creates a large amount of angst for an organization over populating the BB headcount is counterproductive. Once they do those projects you then have a change management issue because you have more change to implement. If we assume BB’s will produce 5 projects per year on the average the difference between 10 BB’s and 20 BB’s is implementing 50 changes into the organization or implementing 100 changes.
    Now the word idiot seems to have created your emotional spike. I have had the pleasure of working with some very professional Change Management professionals. Val Larson has spent years working inside a company to create a system that supports change. Tom Devane was one of the Change Mangement consultants who was involved with the transition out of apartheid about a decade ago. When I see a “Change Management” professional consultant ot not , believing that they have delivered any value when the sum total of what they deliver as a message is that “Change is difficult” they they are an idiot. If a person works with an idiot and refers to them as an idiot that is integrity. When they mask what they are thinking (and in most cases are saying behind that persons back) under the guise of professionalism or political correctness that is a lack of integrity and definately a lack of professionalism.
    The story was not self agrandizement in any way. It was fact and it was the effort of a large number of people so it cannot be self agrandizement. It also took place in 7 different locations in, 4 different countries, on 3 different continents so we aren’t extrapolating this from a single factory/office.
    You did make an interesting comment “your communication style is after all not any better than those who would normally not be selected for GB and BB assignments just for those reasons.” You obviously don’t think much of the people who are selected as GB’s and BB’s with a comment like that. Those GB’s and BB’s are my peers and colleagues so I can live with that comment. You on the other hand probably have a communication issue with those people since you view their communications skills as substandard to yours. A little self agrandized?
    You made a comment “……compares to every SS company that I have reviewed in the past:” is meant to create the impression that you have wide ranging experience in SS. If that is true then you obviously knew this and chose to take shots. If you don’t understand this and have that wide range of experience you might want to get a little introspective but considering the arrogance around you communication comment it is quite likely you have no understanding of MBB’s, BB’s or GB’s and consequently no real understanding of SS.

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    #150996

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Thanks. I am looking forward to it.

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    #150998

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Maybe Dilbert represents your truth and experience.  It does not represent mine.  Sorry your experience has been nothing more than a Dilbert cartoon.  Jumping in with negative comments and personal attacks by calling someone you have never met and don’t know a fool might give us a clue why your experience has been so negative.  I hope your life in business and personal interaction skills improve.

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    #151001

    Olawunmi Sarumi
    Participant

    In my own opinion, Lean Six Sigma and Change management should be treated separately and combined.
    Reason being, they are two different bodies of knowledge requiring specialized skills, however, its difficult to get the benefits of Lean Six Sigma without a supporting culture.
    While Lean Six Sigma is more of performance improvement, change management tends towards organization culture.
    I hope my suggestion helps

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    #151006

    BritW
    Participant

    Mike – Nice article in Quality Progress by the way.

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    #151009

    GomezAdams
    Participant

    Yeah Mike Good Article!!

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    #151011

    idiotinmath
    Participant

    Agree.CM is  a prerequisite for  Lean-SS.

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    #151014

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    BritW and gomezadams,
    Thank you very much.
    Regards

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    #151031

    RBH
    Participant

    Stan,
     
    Your loyalty to Carnell is admirable but come on man, lets call a spade a spade…this guy hit the nail on the head!

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    #151075

    Jonathon Andell
    Participant

    I don’t agree with Scott Adams’ negativity toward Six Sigma and Lean, but I can get a chuckle or two out of his jabs.
    I think most humor emanates from the underlying kernel of truth. If Dilbert seems to hit the occasional mark or two about Six Sigma or Lean, it could be attributed in part to the myriad of poor implementations. Not one botched implementation proves that Six Sigma or Lean are “wrong,” but they provide abundant comic fodder for the cynic.
    This discussion thread, when we’re not attacking one another, has made some interesting points. One is that change management without technical skills is mostly empty promises. Likewise, technical skill alone fails to account for inevitable pockets of resistance. The best implementations bring both aspects to bear in an integrated fashion.
    Dilbert never will address the implementations that competently address both aspects, for two reasons. First, they fail to achieve the level of blundering necessary to warrant ridicule. Second, it’s just not happening nearly as much as we’d like. No sense shooting the messanger (Adams) for that ugly reality.

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    #151081

    Cityidiot
    Participant

    Have  prepared  a  comprehensive CM PPT.It  is for  sharing ?Please  let  me  know if  anybody  is  interested  to exchange such stuff,
    thanks  and  regards

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    #151086

    All Here
    Participant

    Steve,
    Thank you for the questions, but what are your thoughts? Inquiring minds want to know!

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    #151088

    Steven Bonacorsi
    Member

    I would be interested in your CM.ppt – please send to [email protected]. Thank you
    Steven Bonacorsi

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    #151089

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    I also get a good laugh out of the Dilbert cartoons. 
    As you’ve stated, the essence of humor is that it takes a kernel of truth – and then takes it to the ridiculous – pushing the boundaries of reality to the extreme.  What Adams does with Dilbert is to take elements that we are familiar with from a traditional management perspective and points out the idiocy of it all.  Considering Adams’ background in business and his experience, that is his view of continual imrpovement.  After all, he has cast himself in the starring role of the strip and bases it upon his own experiences in banking and at PacBell. 
    We all know that when traditional management tries to implement any CI initiative without changing from a traditional business culture, it is doomed to failure.  Actually, Adams makes the case for a change management approach and against a traditional management culture.  That’s why many who teach Six Sigma and Lean will use the Dilbert cartoons as examples of what not to do if you want to succeed.

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    #151091

    Steven Bonacorsi
    Member

    First I would like to thank everyone for taking the time to think about the importance of Change MGMT and Lean/Six Sigma methodology.
    After reading through every response I would conclude that my esteemed collegues do agree that we have a gap.
    A. LSS training materials need at minimal a module that links to the existing Change Management Methodology and/or addresses at a high level some of the critical change management concepts such as the soft skills, leadership, proper candidate selections, strategic linkage to projects, and although not mentioned – it was hinted that we sould continue to ensure that the burning platform is still real and that the organization is reacting, least commonly experience shortfalls such as long project cycle times, lack of project engagement, etc… begin to occur.
    Finally, while at the project/methodology level we have solid tools and application guidelines in place – it soulds like we need more alignment on the deployment methodology side “soft skills, leaderships burning platform, etc…” else risk making pocket changes vs. true cultural change. I know Lean Six Sigma learned and leveraged a lot from existing project management tools/practices and sounds like we need to do some more leveraging from our collegues leading changement management practices.
    As an aside, I would also point out that we are still human even with our many years of professional experiences, consulting, and team leadership and that we do get emotional at times. I call on all (myself included) to do some personal reflection on some of the effective vs, ineffective communication (selection of words) and to “eat our own dog food” when we comment to these forums. It does not bear well on our image as change agent leaders when we have varying opinions and builds while responding without empathy and respect. Right or wrong on any particular comments made – they should still be made with a professional respect and consideration. Franklin Roosevelt once said, “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” With that said, thank you again for all your posts. I think we have some work to do in building crystal clear change management linkage into our Lean/Six Sigma methodology, that addresses the successes/pitfalls we have experiences. 
    Best Regards,
    Steven Bonacorsi
    Director of Lean Six Sigma Services

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    #151095

    Vito
    Member

    Good feedback and suggestions. Loved the Roosevelt quote. That was great!

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    #151113

    Darth
    Participant

    Steve, pass along all this great info to Pam A.  She is heading up the CM team.

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    #151116

    roadrage01
    Member

    Steven, As a Change Acceleration Proces (CAP) Facilitator/Instructor and a DMAIC/DMADV/Lean MBB I have learned the hard way that the soft skills are imperative to successful solution development and deployment.  There are 5 CAP deliverables required for my organizations Improvement Projects; Leadership Contract, Influence Stategy, Communications Plan, Attitude/Behavior Monitoring Plan, and Systems and Structures Analysis.  Since instilling these requirements projects have developed faster and been deployed more successfully than before.  Buy in from the Champion and Process Owners is essential from the beginning, if they don’t see a need to change you are handicapped from the start.
    “It’s not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory.”–W. Edwards Deming

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    #151123

    Steven Bonacorsi
    Member

    Thanks Roadrage,
    Could you elaborate what phases these tools have been more commonly used both in the DMAIC and assuming DMADV or DMADOV methodologies. I am familiar with these tools and think they are helpful to the toolset. Thanks
    Steven Bonacorsi
    George Group Drirector

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    #151124

    Steven Bonacorsi
    Member

    Will do Darth
    Steven Bonacorsi, George Group Director

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    #151127

    roadrage01
    Member

    The Leadership Contract and Systems and Structures Analysis are initially developed up front in Define or Measure for DMAIC or DMADV.  For Lean activities we use the Leadership Contract at the onset so that we (the Quality folks) and they (the operators) reach an agreement as to what is expected.  Not limited to the leaders either, can go all the way to the machine operator.  Even counter-signing between management and operators has been used with positive effects.  The Communication plan is initiated early as well especially with Lean activities.  We start communicating prior to any activity simply to let people know that there is going to be an event.  For Lean activities we also develop the Behavior Monitoring Plan and the Influence Strategy prior to activity so that we can readily capture and define the behaviors we see  (or don’t see) and have actionable strategies inplace to help align the behaviors activity intent .  For DMAIC and DMADV we show the deliverables in Improve and Verify/Validate but the development should be an ongoing activity.

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    #151162

    Idiotinmath.
    Participant

    Have  sent it.Please  let  me  know  your  comments.

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    #151224

    Olawunmi Sarumi
    Participant

    The way people behave is dependent on quite a number of levers people skill, structure etc, however one thing i have noticed is that some people generally live a laid back life without any interest for innovation. Some people are just satisfied with their status quo. Now if you have this type of people in an organisation, you would struggle very much trying to change their attitude. Their is hardly anything that will motivates them, they are simply not interested in any form of progression. They just want to do the same thing, and they are just happy getting the same thing.
    What can one do…inspire others and help them to grow

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    #151227

    Vito
    Member

    That’s a valid statement, however, the organization has to do a better job of hiring the “some” of people that are interested and are not laid back to get the work done. In essence, a better job of matching the employee to the task or job at hand!

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    #151234

    Idiotin math.
    Participant

    Excellent  Wrapping-up

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    #151231

    Olawunmi Sarumi
    Participant

    But what can one do, when these people have been working in the organization for ages, even before the initiative was considered.

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    #151235

    Vito
    Member

    That’s an excellent question! Before any suggestions are given, however, please provide a brief glimpse of this organization: example,  Type of industry, Country location, Culture (beliefs/values/norms), etc. Also, why this type of behavior has been accepted for so long? But, more importantly, what is the catalyst for the upcoming initiative and how has it been communicated within and throughout the organization?

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    #152551

    Perryman
    Participant

    Hello all,
    Been away from the forum for awhile.  This thread caught my eye because I am currently developing a practical change plan approach that can be overlaid on the traditional project methodology, but I’ll get back to that.
    I must say the digressions and agressive posts in this thread are alarming and discouraging.  I hope this is exceptional because I greatly enjoyed the open and convivial forum of a year ago.  Maybe some posters should read (or re-read) the Forum etiquette guidelines…
    Back to the topic at hand.  In my experience as BB and MBB, I was trained in both the project methodology and also change management but I always found the integration of the two to be extremely weakly linked.  The GB and BBs I would coach always seemed to have a hard time understanding how to obtain the pulse of the stakeholders and to gage their projet’s likelihood of success.  And even if they did catch some of the signs, they would struggle with the reality of how hard it is to actually deal with resistance to change.  So this is why I am undertaking this challenge. I have a short questionnaire that pertains to change that I have used gauge the change readiness of stakeholders and then adapted my change strategy accordingly.  In practice, it seemed to work but I want to test some theories on it.  If anyone is interested in having a copy, please e-mail me at : patrickdotpressoiratmsssdotgouvdotqcdotca
    In exchange I will ask that you fill one out for the data collection I will use for my thesis.

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    #152738

    Eve A. Sheridan
    Participant

    Method123 do some great templates for change management http://www.method123.com/change-management-kit.php.

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    #152746

    Olawunmi Sarumi
    Participant

    I have said this before, and i would say it again, Lean Six Sigma is a performance improvement strategy as well as cultural change. And i hope you would agree with me, cultural change requires changing the culture from a conservative one to a dynamic one.
    I will conclude by saying Lean Six Sigma and Change Management, require different bodies of knowledge, however they need to be done separately and combined.
    Good luck

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    #152753

    qualitycolorado
    Participant

     
    FYI, here is a link for some concise (and free) tutorials about various important aspects of change management — the end of each of these is pitch to buy additional products (of course), but if you ignore the pitches, you will find a lot of great information:
    http://www.change-management.com/tutorials.htm
    This same organization sponsors a set of very informative (and free) webinars about change management, too — the next set of webinars is slated to start in late March 2007 or early April — here is the link for additional information:http://www.change-management.com/webinars.htm
    … hope this is helpful to your efforts regaring leading effective change ….
    Best regards,QualityColorado

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    #152756

    Perryman
    Participant

    Eve,
    It appear the link you provided refers to project scope change.  Not the change being covered in this thread.
    Cheers,
    Patch

    0
    #154942

    Whitehurst
    Participant

    “WE ARE HERE TO CHANGE, IF WE FAIL CHANGE MANAGEMENT”
     
    REGARDS
    JOE

    0
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