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Deploying Six Sigma Program and Framework

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums Implementation Deploying Six Sigma Program and Framework

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #55026

    Desmond
    Guest

    I am initiating efforts towards implementing and deploying six sigma framework at my company. Company size is roughly 2000 employees.

    It is quite the virgin landscape. Any suggestions, material, tips, dos and donts will be welcome.

    thanks.

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    #198260

    Shelby Jarvis
    Participant

    A great read is “The First 90 Days” by Stephen Zinkgraf This will help you with some of the program fundamentals.

    I suggest really engaging with your leadership and stakeholders. Learn what success looks like you can use this to help you form your program strategy. While you are working with them, it is worthwhile to do a stakeholder analysis. Not only to uncover their position, but to also identify who has similar backgrounds which you can leverage.

    Additional tips and tricks are out there. I suggest you look for multiple inputs to help you begin to form your thoughts. Your deployment must fit your and your organizations cultural strengths.

    Shelby

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    #198264

    Amit Kumar Ojha
    Participant

    I suggest you to first try to link the strategic objective with operation goal and also keep in mind that there many variation and tools in Six Sigma. The application of tools depends upon your objective as well as the scenario.

    Good Luck !!!

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    #198275

    Tareq
    Participant

    Hi Desmond,

    Most of your time during the first few weeks should be spent mainly on planning – there is a lot of planning required for such deployments.

    One of the key planning activities that you need take into consideration is creating a clear vision and strategy for the program (i.e. where are you heading and what are you trying to accomplish over the next 3-5 years) – if you do that then you will know what will success look like. You can then plan almost everything else backwards. For example, if one of your strategic objectives is to create a qualified Lean Six Sigma workforce in all levels of the organization then you need to make your sure that this is part of your plans (i.e. budget, focus areas, types of training, structure, in-house versus external, etc.)

    Another crucial planning item is stakeholder management. I agree with Shelby’s comment above regarding engaging stakeholders because you need to know and understand who is with you and who is not – this will be essential for you not only because you need them to stand by you and open their doors for ‘lean six sigma experiments’ but also they will give you direction and valuable information about the culture of the organization and the political games.

    Other planning activities that you might need to consider are: how will your team develop over the coming years, what support you need from top management, cultural assessment of the organization, branding the lean six sigma initiative, communication management, budgets, and others.

    I don’t believe that the number of employees matter that much when it comes to lean six sigma deployment – one will always have to do a lot of planning in the beginning of the deployment; yes it might be more complicated for larger companies but you will almost always follow the same planning processes.

    I can give more input about this if you want. Just shout!

    Good luck
    Tareq

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    #198276

    berilla
    Guest

    Approach it like service design and not like an ops management roll out. First, who are you designing for and why? And it should be a design-based approach, not a one-size-fits all CoE style-program roll out. Just like you would in the market place, determine first who do you want to service (high profitability) and who do you want to stop or avoid servicing (low-profitability)? This should scope your deployment accordingly. Next define your customer development model along some criteria (eg those ideal customers who are first highly profitable, second highly susceptible to change, and third are more readily aligned to support/leverage your current capabilities – LSS, TOC, etc – should further reduce scope and put you in a good position to be successful….now design the service specifically for them (hint: it won’t involve a full LSS deployment model)….good luck.

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    #198305

    Mike
    Guest

    Hi Desmond — great question…I think I can help. I’ve been fortunate to have a lot of career experience in that area and I’ve put a lot of thought to it. I just published a book on Amazon called “The Continuous Improvement Solution” that should help you quite a bit. The three phases I discuss are Quick Wins; Organization and Culture; Strategic Segmentation. The first two phases would help you a lot.

    Sorry about the self-promotion…but it really is the best way to answer your question. Here’s the link:

    http://www.amazon.com/Continuous-Improvement-Solution-Mike-Fynboh-ebook/dp/B00Y43BPWQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432409801&sr=8-1&keywords=mike+fynboh

    Take care and good luck!
    Mike

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    #198396

    Jim Ha
    Participant

    Hi Desmond,

    It’s 20% technical, 80% emotional
    Use “critical mass” approach if there are already many believers in the management team. This approach aims toward grooming a pioneer group of employees to apply the tools (keep focusing to get the right people, right project).
    Use “burning platform” approach or cancer approach if there is almost zero believer. This means we start with most bleeding areas (process) of the business, just to gain initial results from applying the Six sigma approach. Then sell the results to gain more support.
    In short, focus on gaining buy-in through results.

    Keep simple, and do not force fit tools into the process improvement. If necessary, call it different name to suit the industry and culture. Do not get hang up on acronyms as it may scare the management .

    8 Steps of Leading Change by John P Kotter may help. (www.kotterinternational.com)

    Best Regards,
    JH

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    #198398

    Joanne Wilkinson
    Participant

    Hi,
    I agree with the comments so far and would add one.
    Be the public face of your deployment.
    Regularly talk to the people that are being trained and have been trained (formal or informal). Get involved in the nitty gritty – give advice, go to reviews, offer help. This has a double effect of increasing the profile of you and Lean Sigma and it gives you more experience in how the tools work / are difficult in your company.
    It’s easy for people to be negative about training and tools, more difficult to be negative about a person (or a group of people) who is helpful and positive!

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