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discret vs attribute

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General discret vs attribute

This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  BritW 12 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #47243

    gt
    Participant

    what is the difference?
     

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    #157333

    GB
    Participant

    Try the search function, or the dictionary….

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    #157342

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    Both are considered to be categorical….
    Discreet is usually numerical but not continuous and attribute is usually word based.
    Discreet example….. 1, 2, and 3 to describe # of rolls of material or shift
    Attribute example….color of diamonds or pass/fail or supplier BP or LYO

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    #157347

    CT
    Participant

    C. Seider
    WRONG
    Discrete Data and Attribute Data are the same  i.e. .005″
    Continuous Data and Variable Data are the same i.e. Go/No Go
    CT

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    #157349

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    CT,
    We disagree it seems….
    1st, how can you possibly refer to go/no go as continuous?
    2nd, we both agree that discrete and attribute can be considered categories so I will not argue semantics but the language I’ve always used is attribute is generally letter based and discrete is number based… so long as we agree the importance is solving the business issue.

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    #157350

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    Whoops misspelled discrete….
     

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    #157351

    Fake Gary Alert
    Participant

    You  are  mixing  up

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    #157355

    CT
    Participant

    Just checking back in this afternoon, It appears someone has took the liberty of posting under my name this evening.
    C Seider Apologies.
    But, I do agree with the terminology, just not the examples.
    Discrete data is most usually associated with a count of observations and is usually referred to attribute. Attribute data term is normally used when associated with specifications. i.e. go/ no go gage
    Continuous data usually associated with measurements on some interval scale, and is usually referred to as variable data.
    Since the someone likes CT so well I will use the whole name
    Chad Taylor

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    #157357

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    We are in alignment…..
    Oh, I’ve learned not to take offense in these posts…I’m a calmer guy on average and if I get too p*&&#@ then I’ll stop posting or write something sarcastic back.
    Nice to know who CT is….usually, LOL…
    Chris

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    #157369

    accrington
    Participant

    HBGB B^2.’s reply is the only one you should follow. Your question is extremely basic, and is best answered by you swotting up and learning yourself, or asking someone who is competent in statistics ( I am loath to use the word statistician for fear of the opprobrium this would invite from other visitors to this forum)
    Some of the other replies to your question are totally wrong (note I did not say dumb or stupid)

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    #157398

    BritW
    Participant

    There is no difference.

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