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What Is the Difference Between Discrete and Continuous Variables?

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Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #245695

    kathilee
    Participant

    Can you explain me what is the difference between discrete and continuous variables?

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    #245698

    Katie Barry
    Member

    @kathilee It looks like you didn’t search the site before asking this question. A simple search should answer this question for you.

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    #245699

    kathilee
    Participant

    Thank you. But I need huge definition.

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    #245700

    Katie Barry
    Member

    @kathilee I don’t know what a “huge” definition is. I would suggest you be far more specific about what you’re looking for and why.

    And explain why and how what’s already on the site (and internet in general) isn’t providing what you want.

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    #245702

    Michael Cyger
    Participant

    Hi Kathi Lee,

    Check out these threads I found by searching the site:

    https://www.isixsigma.com/topic/discrete-vs-continuous-data/

    https://www.isixsigma.com/topic/continuous-vs-discrete-data/

    https://www.isixsigma.com/topic/discrete-or-continuous/

    You can use the magnifying glass (search engine) in the upper right-hand corner of the page to find more explanations.

    Hope that help,
    Michael

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    #245719

    kathilee
    Participant

    Thank you, Michael. I had written my question here because I’ve found only this article Difference Between Discrete and Continuous Variables | Differencebtwn.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 9 months ago by kathilee.
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    #252998

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    By definition, continuity is defined by interval, but discrete is not. In other words, given a range, discrete can definitely find a finite number of values, while continuous is infinite. In our daily life, do we really have continuous values ​​in our lives? Take the variable of time as an example. We generally think that time is continuous. It is indeed continuous. However, we cannot measure time as continuous with scientific measurement. That is to say, we even use microseconds. Seconds cannot strictly meet the definition of continuous, however, this does not prevent us from calculating. Because we can approximate the time with nanosecond intervals as continuous, because it is small enough. Therefore, in our real life, we can’t find continuous numerical values ​​in a strict sense. Even if the matter we see with the naked eye is not composed of atoms, not only are atoms not the smallest, but there are also gaps. So we don’t need to study this carefully. Why do you think of this, because when we are doing statistical modeling, we generally only treat category attributes as discrete, and other attributes as continuous, but such values ​​are not continuous in the strict sense, and we want to be able to Simplify calculations, usually as continuous.

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    #253056

    Strayer
    Participant

    I’m not sure why you have a quandary about this. It was once explained to me that a discrete process makes “things” while a continuous process makes “stuff”. The difference is that you can measure a variable for each thing produced, but you can’t do that when the product is a continuous flow of stuff, such as a chemical from a refining process. In the latter case we can only measure what’s happening at a specific time. This has implications for sampling and analysis, as discussed in the literature.

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