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Evaluating the need for corrective action

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  • #47024

    yossarian
    Member

    Hello,
    I work in corrugated board an box production business. Here we have customer claims very often. Some of them for just several peaces. Can someone help me on how to review/evaluate the need for corrective action (not all nonconformances require formal corrective action, only correction) so as to to take corrective actions only for realy important issues.
    Thanks in advance.

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    #156185

    GB
    Participant

    VoC/QFD is your friend.    You need to pulse your Customer to determine what is really important to them.

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    #156196

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    If an issue is “special cause”, or has no assignable root cause then implementing a RCCA may not be appropriate.
    If the issue is “common cause” or a process issue then it may be appropriate to resolve it with a formal RCCA.
    Customers often will request a RCCA – sometimes it is appropriate to push back if it is justifiable to do so.
    Either which way – the first phase is Containment then a decision has to be made if it is applicable to drive RCCA.
     
     

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    #156467

    Tim
    Member

    Adam, how do you get your process/es in control if you do not address the root causes of the special causes, eliminate them, and prevent them from recurring?
     

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    #156481

    mcleod
    Member

    A tool I have used to determine if a formal CA is required or just a correction is by using a decision tree.  Items included in this tree are criticality, severity or impact of the problem on the business (supplier, yours or your customers), frequency of the issue, cost and safety/health concerns.  For each of these you setup a decision point.  Note: Anything that is a safety/health issue is an automatic CA. 

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    #156482

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    Hi Tim,
    your question is a good one and even though short would, as “world hunger”, take a huge amount of time to trully do justice to answering it fully – so here is a “feed a few people” vs “World Hunger” reply.
    So to your question …. “how do you get your process/es in control if you do not address the root causes of the special causes, eliminate them, and prevent them from recurring?”
    I’m going to take the liberty of using an example to help kick this around.  Example – Producing some Aluminium components (Hexagonal, 25mm Hex stock, 2011 grade) on a single spindle CNC lathe.
    In-Control – classical x bar and R chart used to monitor a key CTQ e.g a 19.05mm diameter (19.03 to 19.07mm dia.)
    Assumprion (dangerous word) – Gage studies have been run and there are no issues there (people or equipment).
    Out Of Control – the control chart may show production that goes out of control and this may be caused by common cause issues such as tool tip wear. However special cause issues may kick in such as:
    – material stock differences (incorrect grade), head bearing issues, collet pressure issues, coolant changes, shift change over (machine temperature), tool holder issues etc etc.
    Root cause of issues – totally agree with you that the root cause should be addressed and resolved to eliminate the issue rather than bandaiding or adjusting the equipment e.g head bearing issues – rather than alter the tool cutting path / adjust for wear to compensate for a worn bearing you have to address the worn bearing to bring the processes back in control or in this case one of the driving “little x’s back in control”.
    prevent them from recurring – in this example then Total preventative maintainance (TPM) may be appropriate and even at a level of maturity of implementing vibe monitoring to identify failure modes before they happen to schedule maintainance well in advance.  Another example might be Material consistency – a supplier may have accidentally extruded 3xxx series materials instead of a 2011 grade.  When changing bar stock production goes from free machining to something “totally different” unknowingly causing a special cause event i.e diamerter dimension cannot be held in production.  Root cause may drive back up the supply chain to materials analysis – Root cause and corrective action may include a solution of materials certification with shipment which is derived from the material extruders changing their processes (in process step verification of CTQ’s) to prevent re-occurence of mixed materials.
    This may have helped or may have spawned a whole lot of new questions, clarrification or debate.
    Regards,
    Adam
     
     
     
     

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    #156648

    Anton Javier
    Participant

    Well, I understand your situation because in the electronic or semiconductor industry, it is just about the same situation.   What you can possibly do is that when you receive a customer complaint, you can form a mini-corrective action team to first make an assessment of whether the complaint require a full blown corrective action procedure or an abbreviated one covering simple containment actions only.
    Of course, make sure though that this is incorporated in your procedures in case you will implement as this might be a nonconformance during a quality system audit.
    Anton Javier     
     
     

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    #172931

    alex Trajano
    Participant

    Hey Anton,
    been looking for you, where and how can i contact you.
    need your expertise on QMS for our family biz
    alex trajano

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