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How Can a Company Reduce Intellectual Waste?

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #54494

    cletus
    Guest

    ways we can reduce intellectual waste

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    #195611

    Anonymous
    Guest

    Try using the following process: who, what, where, why, when :-)

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    #195621

    Don Strayer
    Guest

    Look into the 8th muda (waste) that Shigeo Shingo added to his classic 7 wastes. This is mismatching people’s job assignments to their skills and abilities. During my career I could cite many instances where a person was assigned to do a job he/she could not do well but he/she had other valuable skills that were not utilized. In one instance a person who was a statistician and data analyst was assigned as programmer. He was not a good programmer and was let go. Shortly thereafter we needed his skills but he wasn’t there.

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    #195626

    Prabhu V
    Participant

    Hi,

    Please read the article about ” The Harada Method: Reduce the Eighth Waste” in the Home page.

    Regards
    Prabhu V.

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    #195627

    Anonymous
    Guest

    Just to clarify, the original poster has not posed a proper question! Moreover, questions about Intellectual Property cover far more scope than those described by the so-called Harada Method. I can also go further and suggest the original poster use Word’s grammar checker, and then cut and paste in the forum’s text box; not because I’m picky about grammar, but just to confirm the the question actually makes sense :-)

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    #195636

    Kimmy Burgess
    Participant

    Good question really I like it a lot it focuses on the present problems that companies are facing theses days, the replies to these question provide a great manifest to overall topic making it a really great and important one yo read

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    #195637

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    @Andy-U Poorly posted questions is an ongoing problem of this site. Best strategy is to ignore those posts. Don’t worry Katie usually drops in and informs them of the error of their ways….in a nice fashion of course. As to the topic at hand, the waste of human potential is a valid waste that most organizations either don’t recognize or have the ability to address. In our improvement process, our main tenet is that breakthrough change comes from the people doing the work and not from some management mandate. If we treated our people that way it is amazing how well they respond to the intellectual challenge of driving breakthrough thinking. So, in essence, it is a leadership issue which most companies have failed to understand.

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    #195639

    Anonymous
    Guest

    @Darth It’s good to see your name appearing again in the forum Darth. When is isixsigma coming to London again?

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    #195804

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @Darth @AndyU @improvements 101 At what point is it the companies opportunity to not waste the intelligence of the work force? Is a company wasting that resource if they don’t chase every idea that is generated by the workforce? There was a time in the late 80’s where one of the automotive OEM’s had an innovation lab that was creating a lot of stuff that didn’t move the companies business forward so they sent them out to “help” suppliers. Certainly helped me entertainin them.

    So you either open it up to anything or you truncate people creativity by only allowing certain things? It always sounds good to talk about not wasteing peoples potential just like it always sounds good to just ask the operator what to do to improve a process. Very touchy feely but in practice with a business to run it isn’t quite that cut and dried.

    Just my opinion.

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    #196015

    Martin K. Hutchison
    Participant

    Fire the HR department-or cut their power.
    Seriously, the smartest people in any company usually make waves. HR departments exist to stamp them out. Ever tell someone that there is a better way to do something (in a fact based manner) and the end result is they take their ego to the HR department to complain? I had a female boss who was accused of being a bully. The HR department wanted her to explain herself and how she could do better while the accuser remained anonymous, and the specifics of the allegation were never officially revealed. Turns out it was a Sr. Employee, male, and the issue at hand was he was not responding to team action items and since she was leading that team, her expectation of his performance was being a bully.

    If anyone doubts that HR departments are a big cause of the 8th W, try doing a kaizen on their processes (have your resume updated in advance).

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    #196034

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    @martinkh I have read your recent posts and each of them drips of cynicism and unhappiness. It is apparent that your experiences to date have been bad and you have been involved in some poorly executed deployments. Many of us have had the same experiences but then again, some of us have experienced some really good ones as well. Possibly you could have an offline conversation with some of the more frequent posters and get some examples and ideas of how the process can work if the right elements are in place.

    In my current situation, we have been deploying Lean Six Sigma for just under three years. It is driven by the CFO with incredible engagement from the CEO and ELT. Benefits are P&L tracked for one year before any benefit credits are given. All functional areas including HR are included. Projects are championed by no less than a VP and usually a SVP. Thousands of employees have served on teams and it has become part of Daily Management. Members of the Board as well as journalists from Wall Street have participated on teams. Everything is documented and shared with our stockholders. But, much like you, this has been the first really decent deployment after more than 30 years of trying. Maybe it is time for you to move on.

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    #196036

    Martin K. Hutchison
    Participant

    Actually, I am in the Consulting Famine half of the Feast or Famine cycle- looking for work. I will have to adapt what I can deliver to the culture that I find, and resist the urge to change the culture my first week. I got some great advice once, “You have to give them what they want before you can give them what they need”.

    Nice (but sad) to know that I am not the only one who has seen the dark side (nice avatar) of Lean Six Sigma deployment. But like a Christian in search of truth in an evil world, I am not going to give up or let the [email protected] keep me down.

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    #196037

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @imrovement101 – catching it in buckets hasn’t proven effective?

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    #196040

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    @martinkh Been there done that. Everyone thinks consulting is the perfect gig until the famine part sets in. Nice to have the biweekly direct deposit now. Good luck in your search and fight the urge to prostitute yourself for the buck. @mike-carnell can probably give you some insights on how to hold onto your integrity in the face of cash flow challenges.

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    #196046

    Michael Küsters
    Participant

    Reading the original question, I couldn’t help but thinking “Fire all smart guys, mission accomplished” :-)

    On a less Dilbert-esque note:
    There is probably no patent solution that works for all companies, but engagement and empowerment are two key terms that will alway be part of the solution.
    Intellectual waste is often caused by poor leadership: the inability to trust and lead people into creating something with a positive bottom line for the company.

    I would not blame HR, because they merely serve to insitutionalize this inability.
    A good senior executive leader would incentivize all forms of positive changes to harness more of the workforce’s intellectual capacity, but usually in practice, every initiative is stifled with simple sentences like “You don’t know what we need”, “No time for that” or “You have other obligations.”

    From a senior executive position, the intellectual waste dilemma looks paradox:
    You must permit intellectual waste to remove it.
    You must plan for resource waste to reduce it.

    In essence, you must give people the time and space to materialize their potential, which means reducing the actual workload so that people get their heads free to innovate.
    Likewise, you must give people the opportunity to implement bad ideas, because if you never try it – you may not even know whether it was bad in the first place.

    You must have a safe environment where mistakes go completely unpunished, because only with that assurance will people dare an experiment.

    Unfortunately, when push comes to shove, the first thing that is usually being rationalized is the “slack time” and “resource waste”, killing the innovation capacity and bringing the company’s creative potential down in a vicious circle.

    You have to see how far you’ve gone down the rabbit hole already to figure out which are the first steps on the way out.

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