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How Can I Simulate This?

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums Tools & Templates How Can I Simulate This?

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Mike Carnell 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #243060

    swatiaga
    Participant

    How can this be simulated? A baseball player is batting 0.300, another is batting 0.271

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    #243071

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @swatiaga Read the book Moneyball.

     

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    #243096

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    @mike-carnell  let’s hope the Astros do well.

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    #243097

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @cseider We at least know they did better than the Texas Rangers. That is the interesting thing they play for months to come down to 2 teams that has one winner on a best of 7 games. Whatever happened to participation trophies?

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    #243098

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    Have you been to any tournament lately for kids? :)    All clear up here for this bud in Dallas but let’s hope recovery goes well for those souls impacted.  I shop SOMETIMES at the Home Depot that got destroyed at Forest Ave in Dallas.  That store manager that got everyone out and closed the store deserves a medal.

    https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Raw-Tornado-Damage-Over-Dallas-Neighborhoods_Dallas-Fort-Worth-563563952.html

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    #243104

    Robert Butler
    Participant

    I don’t understand what you mean by “simulate”.

    If you just want to play games with the variation around a .271 or a .300 batting average over time the easiest thing to do is take a thousand samples – in the first case 271 1’s and 729 0’s and in the second case 300 1’s and 700 0’s.  Put them in two columns with 271 1’s followed by 729 0’s (or the other way around – it doesn’t matter) and the same for the 300 and 700.  Then find a random number generator function out on the web and have it generate a random sequence of integers from 1 to 1000 (sampling without replacement so you only get each integer once). Do this twice and then match the random column one-to-one with the 0’s and 1’s column and then sort the two columns by the random number column so the random numbers are in sequence from 1 to 1000.  This will result in a random draw for the 0’s and 1’s and you can take any sub-sample of any size (1-50,  35-220, 14-700, etc.) and compute the batting averages for those sub-samples and see what you see.

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    #243144

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @rbutler Damn you are good at this.

     

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