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How can lean and six sigma complement each other?

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Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #27971

    Chuster
    Participant

    Hello to everyone in the quality field. I want to know how lean and six sigma can complement each other in saving money fron the bottom line. Can anyone help me by providing information on this topic? I am looking for information or published paper similar to Honeywell’s Six
    Sigma Plus strategy. Thank you.

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    #69198

    denton
    Participant

    Lean is wonderful.  It has some very simple, powerful tools, and can do a tremendous amount to improve processes in an organization.  Lean is the heart of the Toyota Production System, which is an excellent, well proved system.
    Six Sigma is also wonderful, arguably much more powerful, and considerably more complex.  Lean principles merge easily into Six Sigma.  Many of our belts very appropriately use Lean within their Six Sigma projects, but could not achieve the same results using Lean alone.  I have not seen a Lean program that would lead you to do a 2^k Factorial Experiment, or a Robust Design, for example.
    Lean implementations tend to be very “people oriented”.  Some Six Sigma programs are also this way, but many tend to be more “cash oriented”.

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    #69199

    SRS
    Member

    An excellent book has just been published on this topic. It is called “Leaning into Six Sigma.” by Wheat, Mills and Carnell.  The ISBN is 0-9712491-0-5.  It discusses the integration of Lean and SS and how they can complement each other.  Highly recommended!  Reply with your contact info if you are unable to find it and I will help get you a copy. 
    SRS

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    #69220

    Chuster
    Participant

    I would like to get a copy of this book. I couldn’t find it in Amazon, Fatbrain, and Barnes and noble. Any suggestions? Thank you very much.

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    #69227

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    The history of integration is not new. If you look at the card Motorola had us carry from 1988 had SS as only one initiative of many. It also listed Cycle Time (Lean) reduction. Allied Signal deployed Lean at the same time we did SS. General Electric did Damand Flow Technology before they did SS. Integrating the two is not a new concept.
    I wrote a book, with Barbara Wheat and Chuck Mills, called “Leaning into Six Sigma” and it is available on my website SixSigmaApplications.net.

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    #69233

    Rullean Ko
    Member

    is it safe to safe that you can use Lean Principles to implement quick fixes while you can use Six Sigma to have long term improvements and controls to avoid reverting to your old performance?

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    #69242

    John Adamo
    Participant

    Chuster:
    Do you have a copy of the Honeywell paper that you referenced that you can send me?  I am trying to do as much reading on implementation strategies as I can and it would be great to read Honeywell’s.
     
    Thanks in advance for the help.

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    #69259

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Thank you SRS for the referal and compliment.
    You can order it through the website at SixSigmaApplications.net or call Mike at 830-798-1342 or Chuck at 817-300-5280.

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    #69260

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Just another thought on this. The basic lean flow is Work Place Organization > Standardized Work > Continuous Improvement > JIT/Kanban. If you look at the largest contributor to variation it typically comes from people. The first to steps will effectively reduce the variation due to people (Noise). With a lower level of noise the signal (for all you Taguchi-ites) or SS projects are much easier to identify with a lower noise level. The SS process compliments the Continuous Improvement cycle. With less noise and improved quality the predictability of the process increases which enhances the success of any JIT/Kanban effort.

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    #69267

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    A true Lean deployment will not provide a quick fix. These thing require mature systems to work well.

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    #69270

    Chuster
    Participant

    Sorry. I don’t have any documents from Honeywell.

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    #69274

    Niraj Goyal
    Participant

    Hello,
     
    Six Sigma sprang up form the Japanese TQM. The former is an integrated philosophy in which total quality encomapses product, service, deliver an cost.
     
    It there fore links the concepts of Leam Manufacturing (Just in Time) as one that exposes problems and Six Sigma (Total Quality Control – tools and techniques) that help solve these problems. It is in this way the two are linked in the original philosophy. While the names may have differing emphases and some different tools the basic linkages are in my view best understood on this way.
     
    Niraj  

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    #69297

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    There is no doubt about the roots of Lean as we know it today being the work of a truely incredible group at Toyota.
    You are absolutely incorrect about SS coming from TQM. If you look at those of us involved in the early deployment stages at Allied Signal and General Electric you will find the predominate common factor was Motorola Government Electronic (Mikal Harry, Gary Cone, Mike Carnell, Dave Dippre, John Hathaway). There is more influence from Douglas Montgomery in the tools.
    Motorola University had a lot of people such as Char Stocker working on it as well.
    Tom Cheek (Statistical Design Institute) and his guys from TI worked with a lot of the Motorola people on the DFSS stuff at Six Sigma Research Institute.
    If you want the roots of the philosophy read “Managerial Breakthrough” by Juran written in 1964. That is the first time you see the actual distinction drawn between Control – an absence of change and Breakthrough – change.
    I am not trying to be argumentative but a lot of people did a lot of work on this early on at Motorola back when the Government Group called it Process Characterization. Their work should not be short changed.

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    #69300

    Niraj Goyal
    Participant

    Mike,
     
    Thanks for comments which I enjoyed reading. I have a few more thoughts and perhaps on your note.
    Your point on breakthrough and control – absence of it – is very interesting and i will certainly get Juran.
    But in your experience and opinion how would you define breakthru?
    Is it achieved when 6 sigma performance is achieved?  As compared to say 3-4 sigma achievement?
    I am of the opinion that there may be a lot of other factors in breakthrough other than just improving sigma – like technology, out of the box (creative thinking), ideas from diverse industries etc.
    Further digressing a bit there was discussion about DPMO on this forum sme time back. In my opinion Opportunities never end (continuous improvement) – today what we see as opportnities and defects – once they are conquered new opportunities emerge. Your views would be welcome.
     
    regards,
     
    Niraj

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