iSixSigma

How invented TQM

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General How invented TQM

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #48885

    Space odyssey
    Member

    Good morning,
    I know, that most of TQM-Principles have their origin in Deming’s lesson. But when did the term TQM appear the first time? Who used or published it?
    Do you now articels or books which are evidences for TQM as independent methodology?
    Best Regards
    Torsten

    0
    #165951

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    1984 – Unites States Navy Air Systems Command, North Island

    0
    #165956

    Space odyssey
    Member

    Hi Six Sigma Shooter,thank you for your replay. I found these information in wikipedia. But I’m still looking for evidences such as articles or books.Could you please be so kind and provide a link or some references?BRTorsten

    0
    #165957

    Deanb
    Participant

    A historical and definitive source you can use is ASQ’s site:http://www.asq.org/glossary/t.htmlHere they indeed cite the US Navy as having first coined the term TQM.

    0
    #165958

    Space odyssey
    Member

    Hey Deanb,if TQM has been developed 1984 from the navy, then it has been developed parallel with Six Sigma.Am I right?BRTorsten

    0
    #165959

    walden
    Participant

    The US Navy first USED the term TQM in 1984. The philosophies and tools associated with TQM are much, much older.

    0
    #165960

    Deanb
    Participant

    I am no historian, but many old pros I know in Quality consider the tools of TQM and six-sigma to have been around at least 50 yrs and probably longer if you go back to Fisher and Fred Taylor. The packaging and deployment is what varies. The Navy apparently coined the term TQM. The individual tools go way back.The concept of “total” or looking at quality holistically or org-wide has a close affinity with systems theory, which Deming was a scholar and champion of. Juran also pushed the “total” concept with his Cost of Quality committee in the 1950’s.My sense is TQM largely predated six sigma in philosophy and application, but did overlap some, and possibly still does. As time goes on, IMHO six-sigma seems to be becoming more and more “total” oriented. Again, I am no historian. Cheers!

    0
    #165963

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    I first heard that TQQM was develoiped by the Navy from Thomas Crowe, a former Chief Petty Officer of the Navy.  I had worked with Tom at GenDyn, Convair during the TQM Mandate for DOD days (he was part of our training dept.).  We later bumped into one another at the 1992 Deming Seminar (Tom was there with a bunch of guys from the Navy TQM Team, Little Creek, VA).  I remember one of the Navy guys asking Dr. Deming about his thoughts on TQM during a book signing break and Dr. Deming said he had never heard of it – didn’t know what it was – which was his standard response to the question. Try a search for this article – it gives the down and dirty of the Navy TQM/L experience:
    Strategic transformation in the Department of the Navy: Total quality leadership above and below the waves

    0
    #165965

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Agree – TQM and Six Sigma aren’t so much about a so-called revolution resulting from a dramtically new set of tools and methods, rather I look upon them as an integration and evolution of what has come before, taking the lessons learned, adapting the principles to our own situations, and applying for our own needs.  Such is the nature of continual improvement.

    0
    #165970

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    In my opinion, Armand V Feigenbaum  coined the concept of total quality, and Bill Smith invented Six Sigma.
    Praveen

    0
    #166034

    Pete M
    Participant

    Praveen,I understand you worked with Bill Smith. If that is the case you ought to know the original program was called 6 sigma, and not ‘Six Sigma.’ Pete

    0
    #166042

    Nice try, but . . .
    Participant

    Praveen,
    You are correct, as far as it goes, but it doesn’t answer the question posed.  The question wasn’t regarding TQC.  The question was about TQM.  Per the Navy, TQM had more to do with integrating the concpets of Crosby, Juran and Deming (mostly Deming).  Dr. Deming believed that words have meaning.  That’s why he was adamant the it is the PDSA cycle, not PDCA (Study has much more rigor than Check), and it’s continual improvement, not continuous.   There is a huge difference between quality control and quality management.  They are not the same!

    0
    #166044

    Mikel
    Member

    Hi Praveen,Where have you been hiding? Are those conjured sigma levels and Six
    Sigma without stats selling well?Regards

    0
    #166048

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Space-odessey,
    There are a couple things you should read for some basic understanding. In 1964 Juran wrote a book called “Managerial Breakthrough.” In this book he distinguishes between Control and Breakthrough. They are two very different concepts with different strategies. The interesting part is that Six Sigma has been billed as a “breakthrough strategy” and then is discussed in terms of “variation reduction” which is again the breakthrough/control discussion. Even if you get to Toyota Production System they differentiate the two, Kaizen and Kaikaku. 
    The difference in application most likely accounts for some of the difference in results we see from some deployments to another. A focus on variation reduction at some suboptimal spot will never yeild comparable results to understanding the variation as you drive to a optimal spot (for the customer and the business) and then when you hit that spot what you have learned about the variables that are controling variation can be used to tighten the distribution. 
    The other interesting thing to watch the migration from Six Sigma as a breakthrough strategy to Six Sigma as variation reduction took place because the variation reduction was more consistent with the TQM view of the world and so it was a more palatable change for them. Basically if you can’t stop the change then morph it to something closer to what you are more at ease with even if it is a complete change in direction.
    The other intersting thing to watch with TQM was watching it drift from a hard driven improvement initiative to a passive training exercise. As TQM started to fade in popularity it was placed more frequently in the hands of instructors with distant links to the actual organization that chose to pontificate on quality rather than put results on the table and justify their existence in a business environment.
    Aside from the soap box on the change, the Juran book is worth the read.
    The second book is also by Juran which was his workbook (I am not sure of the exact title but I am sure the Juran Institute can help you with it). I forget how many sessions there were (about 14) but it was designed to walk you through the a problem solving methodology while you concurrently ran a project. Sounds pretty familiar to the way most of us have been deploying Six Sigma since 1995. Imagine that another none original idea from Six Sigma but still putting the pieces together.
    I am not sure there is a lot of value in determining “who invented what” other than maybe to satisfy you curiosity and that has intrinsic value. There is a great deal of value in these two books to understand the roots of some of this regardless of what you call it or how you spell it.
    Just my opinion.
    Good luck

    0
    #166050

    Mikel
    Member

    The second book was Juran on Quality Improvement. There was a viedo tape series that accompanied it.

    0
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.