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How long before a GB should become a BB

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  • #31410

    Diorio
    Member

    My boss wants me to train a group of GB’s in our company and then 3 month’s later train them for BB. Is there a period of time/projects completed before they should make that jump?Thanks in advance.

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    #82799

    GV
    Participant

    he is out of his mind!!!
    But it also depends on the skill level of the GB’s and the support given to work in projects

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    #82800

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    Your boss is an absolutely clueless fool!
    ugh…
    -El Guapo, the Certified Master-Chimichanga

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    #82801

    Terry
    Member

    Your boss doesn’t get it.  I bet he wants you to “finish the Six Sigma program” too.
    Terry

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    #82802

    Lomax
    Participant

    Rich,
    The issue is not the time, but whether your company really needs these individuals to be BBs.  If so, then their training should be geared towards that from the beginning.  I have seen too many companies “train” people to become BBs just to satisfy some pre-conceived quota and then not be able to utilize their new “agents” effectively due to a lack of projects, MBB support, and most importantly, a lack of management support/direction.
    If you are training BBs, am I to assume you are a MBB? If so, you should be more concerned about the mis-understanding of the Six Sigma philosophy on the part of your management than the time between belts.
    As you should well know, Six Sigma is predicated on data and facts.  So my advice would be to determine the critical business needs, identify associated Six Sigma projects to address these needs and let that determine how many BBs and GBs you need. 
    Just my two cents worth…
    Neil

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    #82804

    Diorio
    Member

    I would agree.  It’s not about whether we need GB to be BB.  It should be about the business needs.  Currently, we are just starting the six sigma initiative and we have 6 BB in the company.  I communicated that I do not think we need any more BB because the ones we have are being pulled off to do other things that do not pertain to SS projects.  The thinking is that they will use these tools in their new positions.  It seems we’re just a BB machine cranking out the BB with no direction for the SS initiative.
    Rich

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    #82806

    Aravena
    Participant

    Heebee,
    El Guapo???   I suspect more like el feo.  But your right about the boss – clueless.
    Pablo, Master Burrito Supreme

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    #82807

    Singh
    Participant

    Rich
    I would suggest that GB should complete one project atleast after being trained as GB and then go for BB training depending on business needs. Keep in mind every training costs and ROI should validate this investment in BB training before you put these guys for BB training.
    Regards
    Dev

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    #82808

    Ropp
    Participant

    Rich –
    Been there ;
    done that ;
    I left a company that I had 22 years into because of the same kind of issues. When they fired my boss after we had successfully trained our suppliers(we told them our internal processes needed fixing first, but it was mandated to go to suppliers) , I finally realized that there was no changing them.
    My advice and I realize what free advice is worth, RUN do not walk to the MONSTER.COM or other board and GET OUT!
    Unless there are some signs that they will change or you have huge unvested stock options or other good reasons to stay, you will grow more professionally and be far happier in another situation.
    Of cousrse, maintain a professional attitude and do what you can until you get out.
    This is analogous to watching a close friend or relative with a deadly disease. You will only cause yourself great stress that may even affect your health and well being if you stay in such a frustrating environment.
    Hope what ever you decide, it is right for you.
     

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    #82810

    Lomax
    Participant

    Rich,
    I helped start up and became an MBB in a $500MM division of a company.  The Senior Mgmt. mistakenly made the decision to include SS as “part of normal job duties.”  The fallacy here is that, for the first 3-5 years (could be much longer), you need 100% dedicated resources to integrate and institutionalize SS into the company culture.  There is way too much fire fighting in most companies today to launch a SS program with people who are partially dedicated.  It simply will never get off the ground. 
    Depending on your position in the company and other political factors, you may need to call a “time-out” and convince mgmt. to develop a long-term (5 year) SS strategy with dedicated resources (MBB and BB) to ensure the program’s success, or else it will die a slow, painful death.
    Neil

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    #82813

    Dr. Ted
    Participant

    I totally agree. If you look at the enterprises who are SS success “stories”, each took the time (and the effort and the $$) to institutionalize the process, rather than quickly looking for the “low hanging” fruit. For example, company A “implements” SS in their manufacturing plant and tells the world that SS is part of their culture. Company B wants to do big business with Company A, and is invited to visit them. Company B says: “Love that SS, how did the initiative work for your HR department?”. If the process was institutionalized, the answer would be there for them to see. If “implemented”, the culture has not had the chance to inculcate SS. Champions, MBBs, GBs and us common folk in the trenches are only as quality oriented as the people driving the process. Everyone has to participate in SS, and it takes time.
    Dr. Ted

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    #82856

    anon
    Participant

    Rich,
    The rule of thumb is that GBs completed about 3 projects in 2 yrs time by working about 40-50 % in Six Sigma and BBs complete 7 over the same time-span by being involved 100%.
    Another area of difference is that typically, GBs work in their own functional areas, whereas BBs are mostly like consultants, who take up projects in different areas in the organisation. 
    The 3 projects allow GBs to mature and to soak in the Six Sigma techniques while at the same time performing their own roles. Remember, GBs are not full time Six Sigma practitioners.
    Introducing a big project to a GB after one or two initial successes on smaller projects (success means success on all fronts-financial payback, impact on people, leadership, and most importantly, adherence to project deadlines), would be a good idea to then pull out an exceptional GB and induct him as a full time BB.
    According to me, there would not be much merit in hurrying up the transition, then you may stand to lose in the long run.
    Best regards,
    Anon.
     
     

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    #82880

    Diorio
    Member

    All,
    Thanks for your thought.  I thought he was jumping ahead too fast.  It seems that the more BB we have, the less SS project that are completed.  They get moved on to other positions and never get a chance to complete more than one project.  I think the more GB we get trained, will promote the SS culture into the organization. 
    I will share these thoughts with my boss and keep you posted on what happens.
     
    Thanks again,
    Rich

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    #82883

    Grosvenor
    Participant

    Sounds like you need to confront this boss with what reality vs. appearance actually is, what are his bosses saying? 

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    #82885

    Diorio
    Member

    Chuck,
    First, his boss is located at the corporate level.  I don’t think his boss knows anything of what is going on since he will be wanting me to do the training in house.  If the training is done in house, no additional expense, so no approval from corporate.
    Rich

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