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How much education should you have to try for a Black Belt.

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General How much education should you have to try for a Black Belt.

This topic contains 17 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  scott mandel 12 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 18 posts - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #27101

    Trae
    Member

    How much education is needed to go through a Black Belt program (or reccomended).What types of colleges classes?Can anyone attend a training program to become a Green Belt or a Black Belt or do you have to be sent by a company?I’m a regular machine operator for a company but i would like to try and become a green belt then eventually a black belt.My company uses a different system called Kaizen and the machine operators don’t get envolved.Is there a way i could get six sigma training on my own without my company backing me?

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    #65926

    Patrick Waddick
    Participant

    A well rounded education is the best way to prepare for a leadership role such as the BB and MBB. “Hard” skill sets (math, statistics, economics, business courses), as well as “soft” skill sets (psychology, management, etc.) should serve well in developing the ability to see the big picture in everything that you do, as well as the detail. At progressive companies like GE, the Black Belts and Master Black Belts are chosen as future leaders of the business. They are the cream of the crop as far as leading an organization to the highest levels of success. Wherever you can develop your skills as a leader, a change agent, and a results-oriented manager, that’s the avenue you should choose.

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    #65928

    Joe Perito
    Participant

    If the instructors will take time to explain the formulae to you, the ability to read and write and handle fractions, percents, ratios and exponents will do. A real helper would be algebra. But as I said, if the instructors will explain the formulae, the higher math is not needed… but sure would help. You can pick up books on Six Sigma but you should have some background in statistics. The more the better. Of course you can get books on this also. For the beginner I would reccomend Wheeler’s “Understanding Statistical Process Control” and ASTM’s STPD 15 “Manuual on Data Presentation and Control Chart Analysis” and Schuam’s Outline Series, Therory and Problems In Statistics” (McGraw Hill) and Cliff’s Notes – “Basic Statistics”. Unfortunately, I have not seen any Six Sigma Black Belt Courses that any individual can afford. These four week courses are in the tens of thousands of dollars. If you are an ASQ member, the discount price is $35,000.

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    #65931

    Kevin Mader
    Participant

    There is no simple answer to your question. Most would assume that the further along in traditional schooling you go, the better off you will be at picking up concepts. This is a fair assumption but not entirely true. The two gentlemen to respond earlier give good advice for core area of studies and basic individual requirements. What is essential is the capacity to learn. The problem with self-study is that if you begin to learn something incorrectly, you lack the guidance to correct the problem. It will be important for you to seek additional guidance. You might find some of it here.

    I disagree on the point of developing to be a “results-oriented manager”, however. IMHO, the answer is in the process, not the result. I would suggest becoming a process-oriented person. The Kaizen program you mentioned is a process-oriented approach, albeit by your disclosure, this appears to be dysfunctional. This needs to be corrected by making the process cross-functional.

    Good luck with your studies!

    Regards,

    Kevin

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    #65944

    Joe Perio
    Participant

    I guess experience is a better answer than guesses. Let me refer you to one of my true life experiences. I started work in the laboratories of Allied Chemical (now Allied Signal) 35 years ago. At that time it was staffed by 40 some men with high school educations and higher. As the years went by, senior people from production started transfering into the lab and it eventually became all women and some with as little as 10th grade educations. They prepared chemical samples, conducted various titrations, used gas chromatographs, ran atomic absorbtion units, did scanning calorimeter determinations of polymers types and melt points, used computer driven automated viscosity equipment, used colorimeters, refractometers, and scanning infrared absorbtion units, prepared and standardized various reagents, etc. And they did a very good job at all of it. Some went on to supervision and higher levels. This taught me that “anyone” with average (or better)intelligence can be taught to do most “anything”. After all, isn’t that exactly the same thing the universities are doing?
    Yes, the better your technical training you have,the more tools you have to work with and the better your ability to relate. But we all started from ground zero didn’t we? Learning is not a 50/50 proposition. Starting at groud zero, the greatest burden of responsibility belongs to the teacher.

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    #65993

    walden
    Participant

    It is so nice to see a posted reply such as yours. I came from the production floor with my college education only partially finished, but with my “average (or better) intelligence” have been able to perform the tasks set out for me as a BB. I find my new role as rewarding and meaningful as your reply to this posting regarding education necessary to become a BB.-Thank You!

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    #65996

    Kevin Mader
    Participant

    Joe,

    Learning is an inherent quality and as such, the burden to learn is with the individual, not the teacher. But to your point, having a teacher that encourages folks to learn is invaluable. The best teachers that I ever had were truly facilitators rather than teachers.

    The problem with our current educational system is that we do put the burden on the teacher. If the child does not learn, we blame them or the teacher. That fact is this: the system has failed, not anyone individual.

    Formal education amounts to a small part of our overall learning. IMHO, too much emphasis has been put on this. This is not to say the school is unimportant. The contrary is true. As long as people continue to cultivate the intrinsic need to learn, we will all continue to be pleasanly pleased by the contributions they make.

    Regards,

    Kevin

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    #65997

    Jim Parnella
    Participant

    Trae,
    I’d recommend a Bachelor’s degree in a technical field as the prerequisite educational background for Black Belt training. That’s MY recommendation, but not everyone’s. For example, Dupont (the plant in my area) is one company that I know of that will select certain non-degreed hourly employees for this training, but they are “very careful” who they select.

    Many people with less education can be successful with Green Belt training because it is not so detailed and technical in nature, and the projects are less difficult. But I think that even this level is not appropriate for everyone. I’ve heard that some places offer a “yellow-belt” program for one or a few days that would generally be applicable across the board for most workers. They would learn the basics of most of the Six Sigma tools. These folks would be ideal to work on a team led by black belts or green belts. Of course, you don’t have to take Six Sigma training to be a successful team member on a Six Sigma team. If you know about Process Flow Diagrams, Cause & Effect Diagrams, and Pareto Charts you can contribute. And if you are familiar with any of the the other tools (Run charts, Histograms, Control charts, Failure Mode and Effects Analysis, design of experiments) you can be even a more valuable player. You don’t need Six Sigma training per se, to learn these tools. You can pick up this training in many existing quality courses and books.

    Yes anyone can attend a class provided you pay the money, either at the HQ for the consulting comapny, or at a public seminar. A company does not have to send you. However if you want training on your own without either you or the company paying for it, you’re best bet is to buy and read books on the subject. I’ts certainly not the best way to learn (probably one of the worst ways), but in your situation, it may be your only choice.

    But, if someone you knew could get you into Six Sigma classes at their company without charge, and if your company would give you the time off to attend, now THAT would be a great deal!!

    Good Luck.
    Jim

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    #65998

    Jim Parnella
    Participant

    Joe,
    You can get terrific Six Sigma black-belt training at a public seminar here in Texas for about $4800 for the 4-week course (plus your travel expenses of course).

    The instructor is excellent. He is semi-retired and now runs his course in conjunction with the University of Texas. Successful projects will result in a certification from the University, provided that the instructor is satisfied with your report of course.

    Send me an e-mail and I will give you the information to contact him.

    Jim

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    #65999

    Juan Medina
    Participant

    I am really interested for a Blacbelt training. Does anybody know an academy in San Diego,CA area?

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    #77295

    marathe
    Participant

    Jim Parnella:
    Could you send me the details of this class that you mentioned in Texas.
    I am an MBA student with background in software technology. Currently I am working on a Process Excellence project as an intern and am very interested in continuing on this path. Black Belt training is something that I am looking forward to.
    I would really appreciate your help and advice.
    Thanks.
    Gauri.

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    #102697

    Ashutosh Tripathi
    Participant

    how to get register for six sigma training to be a green/black belt?
     

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    #102799

    Banala Bhaskar
    Participant

    Is there any institute in India which gives training on six sigma.
    thanks
    Banala

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    #116341

    Scott
    Member

    Can employees doing the work in the shop be green belts? I’m talking intelegent employees that have been doing the work process. I’m always under the impression people who do the work can help your company save big time money. They are more familiar with the process and of faster and better ways of doing the process.

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    #116344

    sqe
    Member

    Yes.

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    #116387

    Scott
    Member

    As I was reading Implementing World Class manufacturing. I was noticing 6 sigma sounded very familiar. So I looked up in an old college text book Edward Deming and I find his theory is just about the same.  Isn’t 6 sigma just a modern day version of the same?

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    #120803

    Sapre
    Member

    Ms Bhaskar,
    There is an institute in Delhi –QAI which gives the training.
    write to : ites@qaiindia.com.
    Thanks

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    #158745

    scott mandel
    Member

    ANYONE LOOKING FOR A REAL Six Sigma Black Belt POS. In NJ, please email me at njheadhunter02@yahoo.com
    SEND ME YOUR RESUME as I like to assist people in obtaining their next project.

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