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How to Calculate OEE?

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  • #40277

    Kulkarni
    Member

    HI,
    I am calculating the OEE for one of the machines we have. I am trying to figure the “availability” for the machine.
    The shift is 8Hrs. Lunch break is 1 Hr, and setup time for the machine is 1 hr.
    1) is the downtime just 1 lunch hr ? or is it 2 hrs(lunch + setup)
    availabilty = operating time(OT) / net available time (NAT)
    NAT = TOTAL TIME – DOWNTIME (lunch/setup or both??)
    CAN I take the OT as the actual machine run time, in the 8 hr period.
    Can anyone plz explain how i can calculate the OEE?
    Thanks a lot,
    Vidya

    0
    #124566

    Geckho
    Participant

    You’ll probably get a lot of answers, because I’ve seen people calculate it a number of different ways.
    If it was me, though, I’d use 8 hours minus lunch as net-available.
    My reasoning is that lunch is lunch.  This is time that the machine is scheduled to be down.  Do you ever run the machine during lunch?  Do you have “relievers”? If so, then you may even want to include lunch in the NAT.
    So why not include setup time?  My reasoning may be a little “weird”, but I think of setup time as something that I will want to improve (maybe by getting one of the Lean weenies to do some SMED or something).  Therefore, this is time that I would really prefer to be up, but there is something preventing me from doing so.  Notice the dissimilarity from lunch, where I am scheduling the machine to be down.
    What I tell people is that Downtime is defined as “time that I wanted to be running but couldn’t”.  If that includes lunch in your calculation, then so be it.  It wouldn’t make it into mine, but everybody does a little different.
    My two cents…

    0
    #124578

    senthilvasan
    Member

    Dear Vidya,
    My feedback is you need not take Over Time as Machine running time in planning phase since it is not a regular one.
    The regular OT is nothing but regular working hours.
    Your Machine operating time becomes;
    8 (Working Hours)-1(Lunch/break etc)-set-up time + OT.
    Thanks & Regards,
    Senthil
     
     

    0
    #124579

    MKS
    Participant

    Your query needs to lok right rom its origin…..Why do we calculate OEE ? It is actually the total time availability against which an equipment is compared for its use. You see, Lunch hour is something which can always be overcome by various means but the fact remains – how much was the M/C utilised. Therefore , as done in many industries, OEE gets calculated on 24 Hr basis.
    Hope you can appreciate the logic.

    0
    #124584

    Paul Gibbons
    Participant

    Hi
    Your OEE is 86% based on the Nakajima OEE protocols;¬)
    Post your email and I will send you the full spreadsheet.

    Sample OEE Worksheet for an Extrusion Process

    Minutes

    Base Hours
    A
    Standard hours available
    480

    B
    Planned Downtime
    60

    C=A – B
    Loading Time
    420

    Availability
    S1
    Waiting setter
    0

    S5
    Line changeover
    60

    S6
    Start-up period
    0

    0

    M1
    Maintenance working on extruder
    0

    A4
    Waiting Toolroom
    0

    D
    Total Downtime
    60

    E=C – D
    Running Time
    360

    F=(C-D)/C
    Downtime Efficiency
    86%

    Performance
     
     
     

    G
    Output (total parts made)
    180

    H
    Cycle Time (minutes)
    2

    I = GxH/E
    Performance Efficiency
    100%

    Quality
    Q1
    Quality Test Sample
    0

    Q12
    Failed Reversion test
    0

    Total lost for Quality Reason
    0

    K=(G-J)/G
    Purity
    100%

    OEE
    L = FxIxK
    Overall Equipment Efficienc
    86%
     
    Paul

    0
    #124591

    AVY
    Participant

    That was a very well prepared sheet. Vidya can now prepare a similar sheet with formulas.
    Just one input, I would like to add further to what Paul has provided. Under the Availability heading the S1,S5 & S6- it is recommended to capture this under the ” Tool Change-over Time “. If it is a planned repetitive  activity, it is advisable to track that time separately. This will help to get the true picture of your process and also since the Tool change-over time is a tracked separately, you can monitor it separately.
    The OEE should typically tell you given the available resources (availability) how are we performing in delivery (Performance efficiency) and Quality (FTT). Keeping this in mind, the OEE calculation methodology can be finalised.
    AVY

    0
    #124596

    Paul Gibbons
    Participant

    AVY,
    From my experience you need to first of all capture as many failure modes in the process OEE as possible over a reasonable period of time. From this data carry out Pareto analysis to identify where the losses are in the availability, performance and quality elements of the OEE. The improvement inititiative will then be focused on those failure modes. If toolchange is one of the 80%ers then focus on that, don’t just do it just for the sake of it.
    I had to delete nearly all of the failure modes on the OEE sheet I posted because the file was too big to upload.
    Paul
    Paul

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    #124597

    AVY
    Participant

    Paul,
    I have never said that what u r following is wrong, instead I was just trying to explain Vidya, the OEE concept at an higher level.
    What u r following is a very good system, which might work very good for ur organization. I just shared what was being followed in my previous organization. Afterall, we r here to share information.
    Hope, Vidya has got what she had asked for !
    AVY

    0
    #124600

    Paul Gibbons
    Participant

    AVY,
    No worries. I was not having a go at you just trying to present the textbook OEE in relation to the discussion at hand. Discussion is after all about discussing;¬)
    Keep up the good work
    Paul

    0
    #124604

    Rovemeister
    Member

    What does OEE stand for? 

    0
    #124610

    Peppe
    Participant

    All advice received are very helpful, but all things said seems be theoretical discussion. If you are just doing a theoretical exercise, they are OK, if you must simulate real work, I think not. For example, lunch break not always must be considered as stop if you have more then one people working in shifts, so also lunch break can be shifted increasing your OEE. You must have a model of your process (people, shift, maintence, etc..)  and then calculate indices.
    Rgs, peppe

    0
    #124614

    Paul Gibbons
    Participant

    Peppe,
    I don’t think you can increase your OEE by shifting the lunch break unless you are including it as a loss somewhere in the OEE calculation. It would be cheating if you did that and you might even get an OEE rating of over 100% which would be embarrassing;¬) I know because I tried cheating and got caught out in exactly this situation.
    Practical application of OEE is easy in this sense. If you have someone working through their lunch break or someone covering for them then all you do is leave the base hours for that particular shift/day as the full amount. The OEE data capture system should be flexible enough to allow this adjustment. From my experience OEE data collection and analysis made manually by the process operators is far more effective than an automated ones that punch out lots of meaningless data.
    Paul

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    #124622

    Peppe
    Participant

    Paul, OEE (or AE Assett Efficiecy) is AssetUtilization/Asset availability <= 1 (with all subcategories).
    It is quite clear that you can manage these data depending on how you manage subcategories, but at least, will be your aoutput to give you the exact value.
    Rgs, Peppe.
     

    0
    #124690

    AVY
    Participant

    Hi
    OEE stands for Overall Equipment Effectiveness.
    Let me give you a simple example to make you understand how this metric is used.
    OEE is a metric typically used in a manufacturing  industry. Let us take an example of a m/c shop, consisting of 10 machines. Now, as a plant manager, you should be in a position to understand – whether you are using this equipments to its planned capacity. 
    For that you have to calculate the OEE for each of the equipment and check up whether all the equipments are delivering production and quality at the expected performance.
    AVY

    0
    #124697

    Kumar
    Participant

    Hi,
    Please contact me in [email protected]
    I can give you a good template. It will be useful for you.

    0
    #125633

    hitesh chopra
    Participant

    Dear Friend,
     
    As far as availability is concerned
    Availability = Operating Time/ Loading time
    where
     Loading time = Available time (8 hrs)- planned downtime(1 hrs- lunch)
    here u may take setting time (1hrs) as planned downtime if you donot want to improve on it.
     
    Best state is if Loading time = Available time
    &
    Operating time = loading time – machine breakdown time
    remember
    OEE= availability*perf. eff.* rate of quality product

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    #125641

    Vikasdeep
    Member

    Vidya,
    As far as the m/c  availabilty is concerned, in my opinion, even lunch and tea time should not be taken as planned downtine. Reason, we can have operator shuttle plan to keep m/c running. One set or one of the opr of that team is sent early and another later to keep the m/c in operation. It will then be actually utilizing the m/c which is true sense of AVAILABILITY.

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    #125642

    Ron
    Member

    First OEE is a combination of three distinct calculations:
    1) Availability
     Availability

    A. Total  time available _____min
    B. Planned down time(Breaks, meeting, Prev. Maint. …) _____min
    C. Run time A-B _____min
    D. Unplanned Downtime 1+2+3= _____min
    1. Breakdown minutes   _____
    2. Change over minutes _____
    3. Minor stoppages   _____
    E. Net operating time C-D _____min
    F. Available Percentage E/C x 100 _____%

    2)Performance

    G. Processed Amount (total good and bad) _____units
    H. Design cycle time(ideal) _____min/unit
    I. Performance percentage [(H x G)/E]x100 _____%

    3)Quality

    Total Rejects _____units
    K. Quality Percent [(G-J/G)]x100 _____%
    OEE
    L. Overall Equipment Effectiveness F x I x K= _____%
     
    You cannot look at OEE in a singular perspective.

    0
    #125652

    CT
    Participant

    Very Good Ron,
    In addition to Ron’s formulas. Always use true machine cycle time, not standard hours. If the machine has a true cycle time of 5.0seconds then that is the number that is used for your calculations. If machine availability is 8.0hrs or 16hrs or 24hrs (1,2,or 3 shifts) then you use total time usually calculated in minutes. Also develope downtime codes for the machine. It does no good to track OEE if your not going to collect and pareto downtime in order to develope potential cost saving projects. Also keep in mind that very few companies achieve higher than 83% OEE. Below is a link for Amazon Search for OEE for Operators, This is a great little book that has all the information needed to help start up an OEE program. I also have a spread sheet that makes it very easy to inter OEE data if interested.
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1563272210/qid=1124805849/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/103-1660942-2651004?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

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    #125701

    jayant jain
    Participant

    The Actual operation time is always calculated when the M/C actually gives output ( Desired Output )
    The Set up time & Lunch hour is M/C  ” NOT ” and can’t be considered within the total operational time .
    You can increase the M/C operating time by introducing ” Renso  system “( A japanese word means M/C shall not be stopped during Lunch hours and another crew shall operate the M/C when the M/C operators are gone for Lunch. )
    Also you can target to reduce the Set up time for increase in total operating hours thus to increase the M/C output .
     

    0
    #141848

    Murray
    Participant

    Avail hrs would br 8 – 1 (lunch) = 7
    To get NAT you would need to subtract set up and any other unplanned downtime from the 7 hrs.
    OT would be the actual machine run time.

    0
    #144004

    Sundeep Chaudhary
    Member

    hi,
    I’m sundeep chaudhary from faridabad,
    It is very easy to calculate the OEE.
    1:- what is your available time ( no. of hrs x no. of days) A
    2:- What are your maint & m/c failures & setup time. (equipment failures) B
    3:- what are your process failures.C
    4:- what are your prod. & rej.
    5:- cycle time of prod.
    imagine:=- OEE is Z
    if you 3 shift then you have available time:- 21 hrs (1080 min)
    your total prod in 3 shift is 900 pc.
    first calcuate the available time in :- available time* availabletime-stoppage like m/c fail
    then calculate performance totalprod * cycle time*100
    then calculate the qc rating:- total prod. -rej / total prod*100
    then
     
    multiply all three percentages *100
    That’s your OEE.
    if any query please call me 9873020590, 0129-2233091, 92, 93(360)
    i’ve also programmes of oee.
    Sundeep chaudhary
     
     
     

    0
    #155172

    samar
    Member

    hi,
    as your info, i need complete OEE spread sheet,
    i hope you will send soonest,
    thanks

    0
    #155174

    Ashman
    Member

    Would I be able to use OEE with lots or batches? Or is it just for machines and or assembly lines? For example, one lot is scheduled to take 3 hours to complete. We complete anywhere from 3 to 6 a shift. Can I use OEE to determine performance, quality, etc.?
    Thanks

    0
    #155176

    CT
    Participant

    Yes, but you must know the exact cyctle time of the batch. What is the design rate of running the batch? Is the design rate 3hours or 3hours 10mins 45 sec?
    You can mold OEE to fit your needs but keep in mind small changes in cycle time in your calculation greatly affect the outcome.

    0
    #155189

    Chilvers
    Participant

    Paul
    I really like the format and approach you are advocating – is the full spreadsheet something that you came up with or a standard template that I can get over the web?
    I’m reluctant to post my e-mail because of the spam ramifications – have you posted yours to this site and, if so, did you suffer from increased spam afterwards?
    Thanks
    Duncan

    0
    #155205

    Paul Gibbons
    Participant

    Hi Duncan,
    The format is textbook Nakajima as stated in my first message in this thread. Setting it up in Excel is pretty easy so you shouldnt have any probs. Also, setting it up will help you understand the important relationships between Availability, Performance & Quality.
    Good luck
    Paul

    0
    #155224

    Ashman
    Member

    The design rate is 3 hours. The OEE site has the excel file where you can just plug in your numbers but again there is no provision for anything else but PPM?
     
    Thanks

    0
    #163201

    venkata narayana
    Member

    This is narayana,
    I would like to introduce myself, that Lukely i have seen u r mail, i have somay doubts, I don’t know how to clarify, after seeing u r mail, i got Idea that If i put my doubts should i get  answers like u.
    Pl help me out in this regard.
    How to approach, how to put my Doubts in the net.
    For that should i pay any thing ?
    Pl furnush all necessary details.
    Regards,
    M.Venakta narayana
    Email : [email protected]

    0
    #164542

    Mukhtiar
    Participant

    Respected Sir,
    Plz provide me solution for the following problem asap.
    Coursework 1
    Background
    The company manufactures a range of specialist radiator and heat exchangers. A Key
    component of all products is the metallic core tubing. Every product range contains
    these items. The company produces these tubes on a single machine. Due to the
    criticality of this equipment it is important to increase its effectiveness.
    The process itself entails two raw material types, depending on product (brass or tin).
    Reels of raw material are loaded to the rear, and fed through the machine. The raw
    material is then folded, welded and cut to the required length, so producing the
    finished component.
    Current situation
    The company has designed a data collection chart and instructed operators to collect
    data. Currently there is one week’s worth of data collected. No corrective action has
    been taken.
    All breaks are covered (the machine is planned to run continuously)
    The shift starts at 8am and finishes at 4pm
    A set-up is defined as a change of material or cutters (or both)
    Speed is recorded digitally and reported as an average over the shift.
    The tasks
    1 Calculate the daily availability, performance, quality and OEE figures (state any
    assumptions made).
    2 Pareto analyse the losses.
    3 propose actions to improve the situation.
    Week No.
    Product
    Length Good
    Length Bad
    START
    FINISH
    Minor Stops
    No. of Operators
    Start-up Losses
    Reel Changes
    Material
    Breaks
    Breakdowns
    Set-ups
    Comments & Maintenance Shift M/C Speed
    Monday Brass
    1347 (786)
    1283 (1028)
    1588 (780)
    1588 (2350)
    1283 (300)
    25/24/10
    25/5/4
    8:40
    9:40
    11:00
    11:50
    3:30
    9:40
    11:00
    11:50
    3:30
    3:55
    5 – 40 51 (9) 25 45 18 26
    Bad cutting finish on tube, knives
    changed
    18
    Tuesday Brass
    1283 (708)
    1588 (3156)
    1347 (1935)
    5/15/9
    4/6/40
    6/8
    8:00
    8:45
    13:05
    8:45
    13:05
    15:20
    5 –
    66
    (11)
    21 40 20 32
    Bad cutting finish
    Dross out solder
    Changed flux
    Set up machine for tin
    19.5
    Wednesday
    Brass
    Tin
    1347 (1836)
    1588 (17)
    35/20/10/
    6/22/10
    15/20/6
    15/20/10
    6/15/25
    8:50
    15:10
    15:10
    15:45
    – – 60 (9) 29 50 14 19
    M/C down
    Bad finish on tube
    Removed knives and
    cleaned
    7.2
    Thursday Brass
    1347 (341)
    1941 (1194)
    1283 (1082)
    1347 (2040)
    6/10/6
    10/6/6
    6/8/29
    8:00
    8:30
    11:00
    12:20
    8:30
    11:00
    12:20
    1340
    1 – 48 (8) 16 30 20 29
    Marks on tube
    Pick up on tinned brass
    17 15
    Brass 1347 (2808)
    40/15
    6/6
    13:20 3:55
    1 – 70 (12) 19 75 14 39 Lost time during set up 15 17
    Tin 1588 (960)
    12/6/10/6
    6 Greased rollers
    TD TUBE MACHINE O.E.E. DATA
    Friday

    0
    #164543

    Mukhtiar
    Participant

    Respected Sir,
    Plz provide me solution for the following problem asap.
    Coursework 1
    Background
    The company manufactures a range of specialist radiator and heat exchangers. A Key
    component of all products is the metallic core tubing. Every product range contains
    these items. The company produces these tubes on a single machine. Due to the
    criticality of this equipment it is important to increase its effectiveness.
    The process itself entails two raw material types, depending on product (brass or tin).
    Reels of raw material are loaded to the rear, and fed through the machine. The raw
    material is then folded, welded and cut to the required length, so producing the
    finished component.
    Current situation
    The company has designed a data collection chart and instructed operators to collect
    data. Currently there is one week’s worth of data collected. No corrective action has
    been taken.
    All breaks are covered (the machine is planned to run continuously)
    The shift starts at 8am and finishes at 4pm
    A set-up is defined as a change of material or cutters (or both)
    Speed is recorded digitally and reported as an average over the shift.
    The tasks
    1 Calculate the daily availability, performance, quality and OEE figures (state any
    assumptions made).
    2 Pareto analyse the losses.
    3 propose actions to improve the situation.
    Week No.
    Product
    Length Good
    Length Bad
    START
    FINISH
    Minor Stops
    No. of Operators
    Start-up Losses
    Reel Changes
    Material
    Breaks
    Breakdowns
    Set-ups
    Comments & Maintenance Shift M/C Speed
    Monday Brass
    1347 (786)
    1283 (1028)
    1588 (780)
    1588 (2350)
    1283 (300)
    25/24/10
    25/5/4
    8:40
    9:40
    11:00
    11:50
    3:30
    9:40
    11:00
    11:50
    3:30
    3:55
    5 – 40 51 (9) 25 45 18 26
    Bad cutting finish on tube, knives
    changed
    18
    Tuesday Brass
    1283 (708)
    1588 (3156)
    1347 (1935)
    5/15/9
    4/6/40
    6/8
    8:00
    8:45
    13:05
    8:45
    13:05
    15:20
    5 –
    66
    (11)
    21 40 20 32
    Bad cutting finish
    Dross out solder
    Changed flux
    Set up machine for tin
    19.5
    Wednesday
    Brass
    Tin
    1347 (1836)
    1588 (17)
    35/20/10/
    6/22/10
    15/20/6
    15/20/10
    6/15/25
    8:50
    15:10
    15:10
    15:45
    – – 60 (9) 29 50 14 19
    M/C down
    Bad finish on tube
    Removed knives and
    cleaned
    7.2
    Thursday Brass
    1347 (341)
    1941 (1194)
    1283 (1082)
    1347 (2040)
    6/10/6
    10/6/6
    6/8/29
    8:00
    8:30
    11:00
    12:20
    8:30
    11:00
    12:20
    1340
    1 – 48 (8) 16 30 20 29
    Marks on tube
    Pick up on tinned brass
    17 15
    Brass 1347 (2808)
    40/15
    6/6
    13:20 3:55
    1 – 70 (12) 19 75 14 39 Lost time during set up 15 17
    Tin 1588 (960)
    12/6/10/6
    6 Greased rollers
    TD TUBE MACHINE O.E.E. DATA
    Friday

    0
    #164549

    Brandon
    Participant

    You have got to be kidding!! Any other projects you want us to do for you? Or tests you would like us to take for you?

    0
    #164563

    Taylor
    Participant

    Brandon, I read this early this morning, and almost spit my coffee on my screen…………..nerve of some people.

    0
    #164565

    Brandon
    Participant

    Chad – don’t think he’ll try that again…but then?

    0
    #164945

    N.S.Bhute
    Participant

    Vidya
    you can not take set up time as a down time because during set up you can not run the machine. It can not be eliminated or made zero.
     
    N.S.Bhute
    Industrial Engineer
    Pune

    0
    #164946

    NSB
    Participant

    See the formula below for calculating OEE
     
     
    The Formulas
    As described in World Class OEE, the OEE calculation is based on the three OEE Factors: Availability, Performance, and Quality. Here’s how each of these factors is calculated.
    Availability
    Availability takes into account Down Time Loss, and is calculated as:

     Availability = Operating Time / Planned Production Time
    Performance
    Performance takes into account Speed Loss, and is calculated as:

     Performance = Ideal Cycle Time / (Operating Time / Total Pieces)
    Ideal Cycle Time is the minimum cycle time that your process can be expected to achieve in optimal circumstances. It is sometimes called Design Cycle Time, Theoretical Cycle Time or Nameplate Capacity.Since Run Rate is the reciprocal of Cycle Time, Performance can also be calculated as:

     Performance = (Total Pieces / Operating Time) / Ideal Run Rate
    Performance is capped at 100%, to ensure that if an error is made in specifying the Ideal Cycle Time or Ideal Run Rate the effect on OEE will be limited.
    Quality
    Quality takes into account Quality Loss, and is calculated as:

     Quality = Good Pieces / Total Pieces
    OEE
    OEE takes into account all three OEE Factors, and is calculated as:

     OEE = Availability x Performance x Quality
    It is very important to recognize that improving OEE is not the only objective. Take a look at the following data for two production shifts.
     

    OEE Factor

    Shift 1

    Shift 2

    Availability

    90.0%

    95.0%

    Performance

    95.0%

    95.0%

    Quality

    99.5%

    96.0%

    OEE

    85.1%

    86.6%

    0
    #166985

    satheesh
    Member

    Hi,
    In an 8 hr shift, You have to take both Lunch break and Setup time to calculate OEE. Even Lunch break is a planned shut down, You need to utilise this one to improve OEE and Delivery rate. And you have to reduce your Setup time as low as possible with the help of SMED (less than 3 mins).
    But some of the companies has not taking into cosider lunch break. You should have to be improved continuously.
     
    satheesh
     
     

    0
    #170932

    Sridhar Sukumar
    Member

    Availability = Operating time / Net available time.
    Net Available time = Total shift time- set up time-lunch time or simply put the net time the machine was planned to manufacture.
    There are 2 levels of process improvements
    1.increase the total operating time by eliminating waiting time for material, operator etc
    2.decrease the setup time so both the numerator, denominator increases.
    hope this helps.
     
     
     
     

    0
    #172684

    Andhale
    Participant

    OEE wud be overall equipment efficiency, its a product of machine efficiency, performance efficiency and quality (Quantified data).
    Lunch hours, break where other worker can support shall not be counted into downtime becase actually that time production is not stopped – this is the only case where you have multiple shifts. In case you have planned lunch with no production then lunch time shoud be considered for downtime because OEE relates to machine.
    I guess the calculation are well described in many posts and i appreciate those guys effort.
     
    kindly mail be on [email protected] for any further clarification.
    Regards
    Deeoak

    0
    #185279

    Jayant Deshmukh
    Participant

    Pl pass the speciment of OEE calculation on Heat Treatent furnaces. ( Daily and Monthly ) with  6-8 setup & verious cycle times for the day.
    Note – How to calculate the performance for the day.
    e.g.
    Die No       Push Time      Qty/Tray  Total cycles Total Time
    xyz           9 min        12                32                  288
    set up time     9 min                5                         45                              
    ABC        12 min          22             40                    480
    set up time     12 min                    6                        72
    JKD         8 min           18             40                     320
    set up time     8 min                   6                          48
                                                                             1253 min
    Against 1440min
    Whta is the performance?

    0
    #185322

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    Nice of you to do the guy’s homework for him.  Would you do my work for me if I submit it via the forum.  I’m tired of thinking for myself.

    0
    #185332

    Geckho
    Participant

    OMG!  LOL!  Seriously?
    First of all, I prefer to give folks the benefit of the doubt.  If he is genuinely a manufacturer who needs some help (which is a possibility based on the way the question is asked) and I have the ability to help the guy out with minimal effort, then I’m happy to do so.
    Secondly, even if he is a student who is struggling to understand the fundamental concepts of process measurement and continuous improvement, then I’m happy to help as well, again if I am able to do so with minimal effort.
    Finally, no I won’t help with your homework, because you are clearly an unpleasant individual with nothing better to do than flaunt your (alleged) credentials and snipe four year old posts.
    But thank you very much for your valuable contribution. (That was sarcasm, just in case you were too tired to think about it.  I know how mind-numbing it can be to live in Wisconsin.)

    0
    #185341

    Taylor
    Participant

    Geckho=1
    MMBinWI=0

    0
    #186025

    Picklyk
    Participant

    Hi,
    how do i calculate the daily performance,avaliability,quality and OEE  and Pareto analyse the losses for a manufacturer of specialist radiators and heat exchangers when given a comprehensive TD tube machine OEE data.
    Hope to hear 4rm you ASAP

    0
    #186058

    PRASHANTH
    Participant

    can u plz send me the problem via this has i am am unable to do this.
    for your reference i am attaching the required data.
    Week No.
    Product
    Length Good
    Length Bad
    START
    FINISH
    Minor Stops
    No. of Operators
    Start-up Losses
    Reel Changes
    Material
    Breaks
    Breakdowns
    Set-ups
    Comments & Maintenance Shift M/C Speed
    Monday Brass
    1347 (786)
    1283 (1028)
    1588 (780)
    1588 (2350)
    1283 (300)
    25/24/10
    25/5/4
    8:40
    9:40
    11:00
    11:50
    3:30
    9:40
    11:00
    11:50
    3:30
    3:55
    5 – 40 51 (9) 25 45 18 26
    Bad cutting finish on tube, knives
    changed
    18
    Tuesday Brass
    1283 (708)
    1588 (3156)
    1347 (1935)
    5/15/9
    4/6/40
    6/8
    8:00
    8:45
    13:05
    8:45
    13:05
    15:20
    5 –
    66
    (11)
    21 40 20 32
    Bad cutting finish
    Dross out solder
    Changed flux
    Set up machine for tin
    19.5
    Wednesday
    Brass
    Tin
    1347 (1836)
    1588 (17)
    35/20/10/
    6/22/10
    15/20/6
    15/20/10
    6/15/25
    8:50
    15:10
    15:10
    15:45
    – – 60 (9) 29 50 14 19
    M/C down
    Bad finish on tube
    Removed knives and
    cleaned
    7.2
    Thursday Brass
    1347 (341)
    1941 (1194)
    1283 (1082)
    1347 (2040)
    6/10/6
    10/6/6
    6/8/29
    8:00
    8:30
    11:00
    12:20
    8:30
    11:00
    12:20
    1340
    1 – 48 (8) 16 30 20 29
    Marks on tube
    Pick up on tinned brass
    17 15
    Brass 1347 (2808)
    40/15
    6/6
    13:20 3:55
    1 – 70 (12) 19 75 14 39 Lost time during set up 15 17
    Tin 1588 (960)
    12/6/10/6
    6 Greased rollers
    TD TUBE MACHINE O.E.E. DATA
    Friday
     
    Coursework 1
    Background
    The company manufactures a range of specialist radiator and heat exchangers. A Key
    component of all products is the metallic core tubing. Every product range contains
    these items. The company produces these tubes on a single machine. Due to the
    criticality of this equipment it is important to increase its effectiveness.
    The process itself entails two raw material types, depending on product (brass or tin).
    Reels of raw material are loaded to the rear, and fed through the machine. The raw
    material is then folded, welded and cut to the required length, so producing the
    finished component.
    Current situation
    The company has designed a data collection chart and instructed operators to collect
    data. Currently there is one week’s worth of data collected. No corrective action has
    been taken.
    All breaks are covered (the machine is planned to run continuously)
    The shift starts at 8am and finishes at 4pm
    A set-up is defined as a change of material or cutters (or both)
    Speed is recorded digitally and reported as an average over the shift.
    The tasks
    1 Calculate the daily availability, performance, quality and OEE figures (state any
    assumptions made).
    2 Pareto analyse the losses.
    Header sheet number 159251
    Deadline date 29th October 2009

    0
    #186403

    bhavin jayswal
    Participant

    hi i’m studing in london i know to use oee. but i want to know how to apply pareto analysis to reduce losses. i dont have frequency in my problem.i got tube leangth good and bad time of operation, time losses in terms of material breaks, set ups etc,,, m/c speed. can u mail me before thursday

    0
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