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How to Measure and Improve Discipline in Organizations?

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums General How to Measure and Improve Discipline in Organizations?

This topic contains 12 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Kimmy Burgess 6 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #54240

    edjimenez

    Hello
    As part of the strategic planning for 2013, the organization where I belong, realized that the root cause of many problems we are facing up now, is the lack of discipline to follow standards at manufacturing and administrative processes, so next year I will be working on this topic and I would like to get more ideas about, how to handle this huge project. Does any body know how to measure discipline level? & how to improve it. Thanks in advance!!

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    #194370

    Michael Cyger
    Keymaster

    @edjimenez, great question!

    At GE and Citi, we used to define metrics, create a regular dashboard, and then review it with process owners and the executive team. The process owners knew that if something in their organization went awry, that the executive team would know about it through the metrics. This made the process owners more proactive to find and deal with any issues before anyone else knew about it.

    Each investigation would then produce a root cause (not necessarily a full blown root cause investigation, however, like we used to do at GE if, say, an OSHA event happened). If we found that processes were not followed, then appropriate measures were put in place to handle the situation. Those might include proper training, regular process review, etc.

    @mike-carnell & @venerablebede, what do you recommend?

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    #194371

    edjimenez

    Thank you very much Mike, your feedback is very important becuase it will provide us an external vision.
    In the dashboard you mentioned, what specifically did you show? discrepancies of audits? or what kind of metrics? Now we have some regular audits that could give us an indicator of process followeds, like layer process audits (audit realized by diferent positions in the organization), Quality system audits & 5Ss audits.

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    #194373

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @edjimenez and @ MichaelCyger I this the best measurement for discipline is to count the number of lashes. It is repeatable and reproducible.

    Just my opinion.

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    #194376

    Robert Tripp
    Participant

    @edjimenez,
    When I first read this topic and saw the comments from luminaries such as Mike and Mike, I realize that don’t have a whole lot to add except that you should try to avoid audits if at all possible. Audits alone will create a whole new bureaucracy in the organization. You want to be able to establish key performance metrics (financial or otherwise) that can be used to track managers’ performance against challenging targets. Periodically, (monthly) the performance of each key metric should be reconciled to a previously established target. One option could be to count the number of times that managers failed to reconcile their performance; they should be noting where key strategies for improvement were successful or not, and what the plan is for getting back on track.
    In the end, performance to metics is the real answer to driving discipline and action and managers/leaders need to be held accountable (by way of their paychecks and career development opportunities) when they fail to act or perform according to expectations. Bear in mind that this may require some redeifining of the compensation structure and the performance management system so you should consider getting your HR function involved in this effort.
    Good luck…..

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    #194377

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    Let’s just be sure the metrics are repeatable if measured.

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    #194386

    Nitin Dixit
    Participant

    @edjimenez My experience with discipline is that it starts with the Top management- key indicators being meeting and review discipline, consistancy of direction and messaging and tolerance.
    If just the top reviews get disciplined and people start getting to be held accountable, you will not really need a structure down the line.
    conversely, if the top reviews are not disciplined ,no matter what you do down below, it will be more beaurocracy and less result.
    “You get what you tolerate” is an old lean phrase.

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    #194390

    Anand Chitanand
    Participant

    While all the suggestions are appreciated, I want to add some steps taken by us as below –
    – Whenever there are issues relating to discipline or people not following the processes check 4 things –
    1. There is a Buy-in for the proces
    2. People have requisit Tools and Training
    3. They have the required Authority
    4. The work they are supposed to do is a ‘Priority’
    If any of these things are absent, people tend to neglect process. Please have check on all of above. Process measures, audits, punishments will not work.

    In the next phase check whether the processes are adequately defined and documented and well understood by the users.

    Once above is ensured, establish right process measures which are also linked to people’s performance measures. One caution here – Too many measures is dangerous situation.

    There could be certain lapses which can not be captured through process measures. In such case there are some 24 X 7 transaction monitoring tools available which can immediately alert the exceptions through system reports.

    Next step would be to go in for process automation. This can be done for critical processes / transactions due to the cost and time involvement.

    I hope this would help.

    thanks …

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    #194403

    edjimenez

    Hello
    I just want to thank all of you, for the great inputs you provide, now we have analized every comment and we have made a decision based on your inputs.

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    #194405

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    Do tell….what did you decide?

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    #194419

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @edjimenez I really hope my initial response was one you took seriously. I have no idea how you have determined you have a discipline problem but lets asume that you do. Before you start slapping bandaids all over everything I would take the circumstances that you decided were discipline issues and ask the person/persons responsible why they felt that compliance was optional. You really need to understand what it is that has created the situation where feel empowered to decide that they do not have to comply with whatever it is you feel they are not incompliance with.

    Just my opinion.

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    #195090

    Don Strayer

    It seems that one thing your organization lacks is an effective quality assurance function. The purpose of QA is to provide objective insight into what’s really happening down in the trenches. It is not wrist-slapping nor policing. Ideally QA collects, analyzes, and presents aggregate data for management review and corrective action.

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    #195212

    Kimmy Burgess
    Participant

    Discipline is a most for every organization that wants to move forward. The rules and regulations should be constantly updated and reviewed. There should be no discrimination in enforcing rules and regulations. Proper communication with employees and taking feedback in a regular basis can improve discipline in any organization.

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