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how to study Six sigma

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General how to study Six sigma

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  • #30182

    Tim
    Member

    Hi, All:
    I am a ph.d. student of mechanical engineering department. After did some research about DOE for my research, I am really very interesting in six sigma. I choosed some courses such DOE, linear regression, Quality Control.
    Can anybody recommend any books or any rough schedule about how to learn six sigma.
    I am really appreciate about it.
    Tim

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    #78385

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Tim,
    There is a big difference in studying tools and studying SS.
    If you want to understand SS I would start with Jurans “Managerial Breakthrough” from 1964. It will give you the basic concept before people started dressing it up and putting it in the store window.
    Once you understand the difference of the breakthrough mentality versus control mentality you can get the basic flow from some books like Greg Brue’s “Six Sigma for Managers” or Mario Perez-Wilson’s book “Six Sigma.” Both were practitioners before they were authors. The two books present the methodology a little differently but ultimately you will end up doing what works for you and it could easily be different from both.
    That is enough reading – now go fix something. When you do this you will need some refernce type books that can get you through the application. Thomas Pyzdek has written some good books that will take you through the tools and they will also relate it to the overall strategy as well.
    If your interest is really just in tools such as DOE, Regression, etc. then you don’t need to read about SS. There is a difference between the SS mentality and just being intrigued with statistical tools.
    Just my opinion.
    Good luck.

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    #78388

    Tim
    Member

    Mike:
    Thanks you very much for your detailed answer. I am really appreciate about it.
    Tim

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    #78389

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Tim,
    You are welcome.
    You will probably get several good answers. There are several regulars contributors that may see it differently.
    Good luck.

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    #78391

    John Lupienski
    Participant

    Tim…..To study SS is to live SS every day. You can read all the books you want as Mike Carnell says ( which I totally support to get started), But that is only your beginning “on the road to achieving six sigma”. SS is a cultural process change to achieve perfection in everything we do. Motorola only defined 6 sigma as 3.4 PPM because we knew no one will ever be perfect, therefore, we needed to have some kind of a goal to shoot for, when in fact we do make an error or defect.
    If you enjoy changing processes to make them better
    ( or at least as close to perfection as possible as Bob Galvin Motorola’s CEO would say, after learning about 6 sigma from the late Bill Smith who is really the “father of Six Sigma” at Motorla); then your well on your way to living six sigma and understanding how to study it……
    Good Luck ” On your road to achieving six sigma”
    John L

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    #78392

    Tim
    Member

    John:
    Thanks a lot for your response!
     

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    #78406

    Jürgen De Cock
    Participant

    Hey,
    I am working on with six sigma for 6 months now.
    And the more you learn about it the more interesting it gets.
    I bought a book it’s called Implementing SIX SIGMA from Forrest W. Breyfogle III.   Publication by Wiley – Interscience
    I learned a lot in this book and still use it a lot.
    Hope this will help you.
     

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    #78412

    billybob
    Participant

    Hello,
    I can tell you from experience…..
    You can read all you want and you can have all the data in the world…but until you take your “own” data, and apply it to what you read or been taught you won’t learn much.  When I took class I was over saturated with examples using perfect data from fake businesses that always fit and I didn’t learn much…But when I did the same thing using data from my processes “my eyes were opened!” as i relearned what I was taught and what I read.
    I guess all you trainers out there can take this as an area of improvement.  I know if my trainer took data from my proceses and showed me it to me applied, it would have made a lot more sense right up front.  Its sure easier understanding real data (with all its variance) to to make my widgets than to look at how a pizza is made and delivered as a learning tool, of course unless you make and deliver pizzas for a living.
    Later,
    Billybob

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    #78413

    Bennie
    Participant

    Billybob,
    It’s been years since I completed my green belt training and first project…my memory isn’t what it used to be (I can’t even remember what I had for dinner last night).
    But when I read your posting, it all came back. I agree wholeheartedly…until you start your own project (define a defect and opportunity, plan your data collection, collect the data, see gage problems, analyze the root causes, etc. all the books and case studies don’t mean a darn thing. You’ll learn more by doing a project and have a coach then any book will EVER teach you.
    Bennie

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    #78476

    Rene A van Leeuwen
    Participant

    Hi BillyBob,
     
    In general I agree with you… the examples used during course were perfectly fitted and there was no argument about the outcome…
    But…
    Our course was not only about the course-material, but also about the students own projects. Show the progress of the project during the weeks of training and after this presentation a discussion with the class and instructor to get the best practice in your particular case.
    We learned during course already that data you have isn’t always the way you would like it.
     
    Again, I agree there is a lot of improvement for trainers when they do not discuss individual project of students. Luckily for me mine did and I knew from the start that data isn’t always what you want it to be.
    René

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    #78619

    Mikel
    Member

    From Amazon.com —
    Good tools, but heavy on dogma, May 14, 2002 Reviewer: mikeg_xxi (see more about me) from Waconia, MN United StatesWhile this book has a number of useful tools that can be adapted and/or replicated, it lacks objectivity and a degree of critical thought that lead me to question the author’s credibility. If you can sort out the objective material from the “brochureware” hype, then the book is a passable read. Phrases like “Six Sigma statistical tools work like magic to uncover what you don’t know” are commonplace. Unfortunately, very few of the potential short-comings and limitations of Six Sigma are addressed. And since they are barely discussed, there is no presentation of remedies or caveats for said defects.
    While I have not read this one, I did waste my money on his first book and would not take the chance again.
    Stan

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    #78654

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Tim,
    There is nobody that does and lives SS like John L. You will not get any better advice.
    Good luck

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