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Integration of LEAN into MY Six Sigma

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  • #37710

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    As a Master Black Belt, I have had dozens of opportunities to apply the art of Six Sigma.  Since I am LEAN-challenged (not trained in LEAN), I have adapted the DMAIC approach to solve ALL my problems.  The only difference between projects has been the speed of attack, the number of tools used, and the breadth of organizational involvement. 
    Now it seems that LEAN Six Sigma is going to be the wave of the future.  What does LEAN offer me?  I have process mapping skills that allow me to address waste.  I call waste VOC and assign inputs to the steps that cause it.  What will I learn from LEAN?  LEAN-SS veterans, what have you learned?

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    #111517

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    Hi Mike,
    I hope I can shed some light on your dilema – here is an example:
    A BB is given an issue to deal with in production.  He creates a Charter, maps out the process, gathers data, identifies through root cause analysis that one particular process is the root of all the issues. Focusses on this process, undertakes all kinds of indepth statistical analysis, runs a full factoral, optimizes the process.  The project is complete in 6 months – a record !!
    The company employs a “Lean Expert” who looks at the value stream, charters a team, runs a Kaikou/Kaizen event with  a cross functional team and eliminates the “optimized process” as it was “non-value added”. Project is completed in 4 days and the “culture is transformed/energised”.
    From my perspective Lean, along with Strategic Deployment, created/drives velocity in the business and Six Sigma is the Enabler.
    I’ll be honest – I don’t see how any business can trully drive a long term CI program without a ballance of Lean, Six Sigma, Strat Deployment etc.
    If you want to discuss in detail off line that’s fine.
    Best regards,
    Adam
    (1) 720 332 3737  [email protected]
     

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    #111520

    Rick Duncan
    Member

    As

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    #111522

    Rick Duncan
    Member

    As an industrial engineer out of the automotive industry, I may be able to help you. Lean deals with the elimination of waste in a process. The deadly sins of Lean begin with defects which is the focus of Six Sigma. Lean also looks at overproduction, waiting, transportation, inventory, motion, etc. In short, Six Sigma is one of the many tools used by Lean practioners.
    My current project contains elements of SIPOC to define boundaries, Lean’s Value Stream Mapping to illustrate flow days, and DMAIC to drive results and accountability.

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    #111536

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    How about this scenario…
    A Black Belt identifies a project associated with a key business issue… a key business issue. Or it’s not a project.  Day one.
    He forms a team, teaches tools, sets scope with SIPOC, validates measurement system, reviews and updates FMEA, establishes capability… all cool, since it REALLY IS a key business issue.  End of week 3.
    He goes through the full 7-step Detaied Process Map execution and finds gaps, establishes critical inputs through early data stratification, standardizes work, solidifies change management momentum.  End of Improve Phase.  End of week 6.
    He launches the solution, training plan, KPI’s go on the control plan.  Calculates final capability and financial impact.  End of week 8. Done.
    Key business issue resolved.  No DOE, no advanced stats, but a WHOLE lot of shakin goin on.  Can’t this happen, too?
    Isn’t LEAN more of a tool for DMAIC, rather than vice versa?  When I see LEAN6Sigma, I think of this laser DMAIC scenario rather than the “value-stream first, sluggish 6S if necessary”, which I often hear.
    Mike
    By the way, thanks for your warm welcome in the other thread, and detailed response to this pressing issue in my company.   I will call when I get a breath.  Teaching Green Belt, Black Belt, Managing Six Sigma 8 of the next 8 working days.  Nice to be busy!

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    #111538

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Lean tools were developed and used by IE pople. In old days, IE is responsible for productivity while quality is responsible by QE under different departments. Both people never talk to each other and only achieving sub-optimized result because of their silos mindset.
    From the first day I worked as engineer, I have seen the need to break down the wall of IE and QE and combined them under one new department. Although I had lead both QE and IE department, but I have not power to integrate them under old TQM culture.
    Different problems need to be addressed with different tools either are grasped from Lean or Six Sigma or some where.
    People new to lean always got problem to calculate “accurate” manual standard time and causing their VSM analysis worthless.

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    #111542

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    You will get bullets from Six Sigma people for saying Six Sigma is one of the tools used by lean. :-) I were IE first before promoted to lead QE. Got chance to live in both worlds.
    To be fair, old lean (IE) people never used rigor statistical tools to tackle defect problems.
     

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    #111565

    Marc Thys
    Participant

    I have used Lean in conjunction with Six Sigma and it has benefited me mostly from a “perspective” point of view.
    You can get dragged into analysis quite deeply in Six Sigma, and you somtimes lose the “big picture” view. Lean helped me see links and opportunities quickly that probably would have taken me months of data collection and analysis to see with Six Sigma. But I did use Six Sigma tools to validate my lean “hunches”.
    I do not believe that we will ever get a full integration of Lean and Six Sigma, though. I have had big debates about this with my colleagues and we are now split into 2 camps – the ones that say that “Six Sigma rules – always” and just want to fit the lean tools into the life cycle, and the others (including me) that say that Lean and Six Sigma approach things very differently and should be done side-by-side, since the synergies really can be tremendous.
    First of all, Lean only offers particular types of solutions for particular types of problems – making it much less “generic” than Six Sigma. On the other hand, by using your standard DMAIC approach you may never come up with the kinds of solutions that are pretty standard fare in Lean.
    But Six Sigma also offers a lot of insights for Lean practitioners. Take the subject of variation. Most lean solutions try to somehow reduce its impact or dampen it (by using drumbeats, buffers, …) but rarely do they really tackle the issue – because they don’t have the tools. However, with large amounts of variation some lean solutions simply do not work, so this is where Six Sigma comes in.
    So at the start of an improvement project, it becomes a matter of proper scoping – ie you go through D and M, maybe even a bit of A, and then decide what kind of project(s) you have.

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    #111569

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    Marc,
    Thank you for your balanced and lucid response (that’s my way of saying that I agree with you.) 
    I continue to believe that labels have confused the issue.  LEAN and Six Sigma to me are tools and project management techniques which should be used as necessary and where profitable.  I’ll be writing my training materials based on this premise.
    I hope we’re right!
    Mike

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    #111574

    Tronan
    Member

    Please refer to the European forum for my reply…
    T.

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    #111620

    Mikel
    Member

    Mike,
    I am surprized you will be needing training materials since your company is already optimized.
    Remember you wrote – “Had you issued that challenge to me (to improve my result), which I assume you would in a New York minute, I would soon prove you wrong with reference to

    the remaining profitability improvement available due to
    investment necessary to atain said “improvement”
    the capability of the competition
    the capability and affordability of current technology.”
    Since you already have everything at it’s optimum point, who are you going to train? It would appear to be a waste of money.
     

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    #111622

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    I never stop improving.  You, it seems, never stop trying to impress.  That is the difference.
    I participate in this forum to learn, and to challenge those who have learned or promote flawed ideas. 
    Since your intent seems to be esteem-based debate, to argue for argument’s sake, and yank chains, flail away.  I will not respond.  I will, however, continue to point out flaws in logic and bad advice, and will continue to respond to all messages of substance.
    Have a nice life.
    Mike

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    #111624

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Mike interesting debate.
    I just wanted to know. Is the LEAN just the new word for Just in Time (JIT) manufacturing which as I know encompasses some of the following: Kanban (pull systems), level scheduling, SMED (single minute exchange of dies or quick set up, quality at source, flow manufacturing or group cell technology, visual control etc.
    JIT in my previous workplace was called CFM (continous flow manufacturing). I have also heard of it being called “One Piece Flow”. So many different words probably meaning the same thing. Now its lean.
    Is the above your understanding of lean and that of others on this forum.
    Johnny

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    #111625

    Sigma Wolf
    Member

    Maybe this will help
    We’ve been using Lean and Six Sigma both for a while within our company.  The way we decide which discipline is kind of like this
    If we know the answer to our issues it’s usually Kaizen.
    If it’s a materials, manning or flow problem then we approach more lean Focused. 
    If it’s a process focused project that we don’t have an answer for then we use Six Sigma
    We also intermingle quite a bit.  I can use a lot of the Lean disciplines in the improve and control phase of my Six Sigma Project.  I can also use Six Sigma Cause and Effect and Hypothesis Testing to help verify if my Kaizen or Lean Improvements are Statistically Significant

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    #111627

    Dayton
    Member

    Sigma Wolf,
     
    Why don’t you begin by using Value Stream Mapping and if your challenge/opportunity is variance related use Six Sigma tools and if it’s flow related use Lean tools?  With the understanding that any given project might require a combination of Six Sigma and Lean tools used at different times in the project to address different but related objectives.
     Vinny

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    #111628

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    Great question.  I’m 6s geek, which is why I’m seeking everyone’s help in making LEAN make sense.  I defer to my lean colleagues to answer your Venn question – JIT : LEAN 
    (we are always drawing circles with overlap around here.  We just call ’em Venn questions.  What’s different/what overlaps/how many circles are needed, etc.)
    I’ll be reading with interest.
     
    Mike

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    #111629

    Ciaran May
    Participant

    In response to Johnny Guilherme,  It is my understanding that essentially Lean is made up essentially of the concepts of what was known as JIT. There is an excellent paper on the subject from the recent ASQ conference held in May this year which I will be glad to forward to interested parties which lays out the origins of the concepts involved.
    I can be contacted at [email protected]  to obtain a copy in pdf format.
    Regards,
    Ciarán May
     

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    #111630

    Ron
    Member

    Lean is Velocity Six Sigma is Variaition reduction marry to the two and you have the best approach to problem solving.
    DMAIC is the methodology six sigma and lean provide toolkits.
     

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    #111631

    Ron
    Member

    Lean is definetly NOT JIT!  The lean toolkit is a complete sutie oftools similar to six sigma but with a focus on velocity in process.
    Unfortunately most ofthe tool are manufacturing specific a few such as value stream mapping is applicable to administrative process.

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    #111636

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Lean term was invented after “The machine that changed the world” by Womark, Jones, etc. was published in early 90s. Lean is a copycot of Toyota Production System that encompassed JIT/Kanban, level production, SMED, autonomous inspection, andon/5S, cellular manufacturing etc.
    Lean seems does not including TPS soft skills.

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    #111637

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    My approach is straightforward,
    To eliminate non-value added (NVA) activities – Lean
    To maximize value added (VA) or prevent VA activities turn into NVA – Six Sigma

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    #111639

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    I can use DMAIC to perform VSM Lean analysis as well. DMAIC is not limited to Six Sigma application.
    Define (D): Define/Select a product family and material/information flow.Measure (M): Map the current-state MapAnalysis (A):  Analyze wastes and values along the stream.Improve (I): Invent the future-state map.Control (C): Achieving and sustaining the future state

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    #111640

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    In a couple words, you brought a whole new perspective, and one that makes a lot of sense to me.
    The question has often been, which is the method, which are tools.
    I like the answer that DMAIC, Not Six Sigma, is the methodology.  That puts everything else into the toolbox, which makes the whole thing extremely flexible and powerful.
    Great stuff Ron.
    Thanks

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    #111648

    ChefiSense
    Participant

    Forgive my ignorance here but are not these acroynms and naming conventions of processes/methodologies simply the complication/glorification of common sense?  What one needs to succeed are:

    Common Sense
    Corporate Commitment
    Capital
    Communication
    Cooperation
    Cognizance
    Seems to me that this ever evolving process is just a continual re-invention of the wheel with updates to the latest lingo to generate revenue for those supplying training and boost marketability for those certified, which I am all for. 
     

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    #111652

    Dayton
    Member

    Dog Sxxt,
     
    I’m sorry to say it, but that’s just goofy.

    Vinny
     

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    #111657

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    I used to agree that “this is all just repackaged common sense” and the like.  My argument FOR that is below.  However, I support these initiatives and even the marketing behind them.  Here’s why:  
    a.  Common Sense is uncommon:  not everyone has it.  We don’t have time for the college kids to develop it.  Further it is polluted by personal agendas.  We need good data.
    b.  Corporate Commitment to what?  Common sense?  I have shareholders.  I must minimize risk.  I need to know what to commit to.  I need good data.
    c.  Capital is limited.  what should I spend it on?  I need good data.
    d.  Communication.  Always an issue.  More important than “did you hear me?” is “is what I say true?”.  I need, you guessed it, good data.
    e.  Cooperation?  Why should I cooperate with anyone?  Inspire me.  Lead me.  Show me.  Don’t ask me to cooperate (I sense that “cooperate” was included only because it started with “C”)
    f.  Cognizance…conscious awareness… knowledge.  This can only come from data.
    Six Sigma leads people to make decisions base don data.
     
    Answer B:  there is nothing new under the sun.  All good and true and helpful things in the business world are merely re-packaged Christian ethics.
     

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    #111660

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Lectures given by Dr. Deming for Japanese managers in 50s were considered goofy by Americans and Toyota production way also goofy before 80s. Till today, a bunch of people also said R&D way in Toyota is goofy too. Why? Because their ways are totally strange to you.
    Dog’s way is also called goofy now. You will see some consultants put this idea into a book and call it their invention in near future. Want to bet? :-)

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    #111663

    Dayton
    Member

    Dog Sxxt,
    No.  Sorry Dog Sxxt, I should have been clear regarding what I did not agree with and why versus just saying phooey.  Let me try to rectify that.  Your statement:  “To maximize value added (VA) or prevent VA activities turn into NVA – Six Sigma” is wrong in that you can certainly maximize value added activities using either Lean or Six Sigma analytics depending on why the current state is non-optimized, e.g., flow impacts or variance related impacts.   Not that you aren’t frequently prophetic in your forum input, but I don’t think that in this instance it’s a “time will tell” issue.
    Vinny

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    #111671

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Ron
    If lean is not JIT, then what are the specific tools/eliments under the LEAN umbrella that one can use and apply. You mention velocity in a process. Introducting the concept of pull versus push system (kanban) essentially reduces and lowers work in progress. Once WIP is lowered your product will flow a lot quicker through your factory. Leadtime is a function of WIP. Lower the WIP and you leadtime is reduced.
    Also by introducing the pull concept, control of work gets handled by the people who do the work on the shop floor. This then stops the paper flow from a production planning office down to the shop floor indicating what one needs to produce next. There are so many more benefits to introducing the pull system, that to write them down will just occupy space.
    I once sat in on a demo. I was a JIT project (final year) given by a close college. He set up 4 containers. Container 1 was connected to container 2 with a small plastic pipe. Container 2 was connected to container 3 with a small pipe and so on. Container 1 was at the highest point followed by con 2, con3 and con4. Then water (simulating product) was poured into the container (the con simulated a process) and allowed to flow until it reached the last con. Anyway when the con1 was filled to the top it took an awful long time to get to con4. When con1 was half filled and allowed to flow it reached container 4 a lot quicker. Maybe you could try this yourself and see the impact on flow by reducing the water (product).
    regards
    Johnny

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    #111674

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Ok, my original messages also look not very clear. Simply put, let use 80/20 rule for your lean and six sigma resources allocation.
    Go back to dig out your past projects and categorized them under VA and NVA to analyse and see whether 80/20 rule is applied or not.
    If you allocate 80% Six Sigma resources to tackle NVA activities, then I will say good luck for your poor resources planning. If you try to solve takt time variance with SS (I am not deny SS can improve data collection and analysis accuracy in this case), you will hit the big wall.
    For instance, lead time variance can be due to VA and NVA and it’s better to pinpoint your six sigma and lean initiative to each one of them to bring better results.
    To add or maximize values by making your products or services more quality, more reliable, more robust, less defect, less field failure etc. with six sigma tools. While you can minimizing wastes (non value added acitvities) except DEFECT with lean tools.
    Tricky point here is defect. Defect is one type of wastes under lean concept in which SS is a better tool. (for me) 
    Some people may argue lean tool like autonomous inspection is better candidate to prevent defect. DFSS at R&D level and SS process characterization at process level are better ways than whatever effective and efficient inspections done at production floor or down stream.  
     
     
     

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    #111678

    Peppe
    Participant

    Dog Sxxt,  I passed, “unimpaired  ;-)”, through both SixSigma and Lean Projects in my company and my feeling, maybe due to consultants, is that Lean is more based on human factors, while SS on standardized tools. Of course tools and process are always the same, from Quality and can be used in any case. My personal opinion is that SS can learn from Lean, to be less bureocratic and more flexible.
    Anyway, you are quite experienced to know that doesn’t exist  “the perfcet startegy” for every company, but it must be tailored on it, in fact after many time spent, now we use what is the best from any Quality sources, based on the need of every projects/products/processes(Robust Design, Lean, SS, etc…).
    Rgs, Peppe

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    #111686

    ChefiSense
    Participant

    Mike,
    Thank you for your thorough response.  As you alluded to, personnel have their own agenda and not everyone has common sense, so, in many instances, good data supporting a flawed process that can be rectified resulting in increased efficiency, improved quality, and higher profit margins oftetimes go by the wayside because those in position of power are either lacking common sense, have their own hidden agenda, or, like the characters Hem and Haw in Who Moved My Cheese, are paralyzed by change to do anything. 
    What advice would you give someone who has repeatedly beat the drum for change with data supporting the benefits of change only to see process improvement suggestions disintegrate due to highers up or inter-departmental factions, whose concern is over their terrority and not the Company as a whole?  Without going into too much detail, we’ve spent tens of thousands of dollars on various consultants, who’ve pointed out deficiencies already known by personnel only to see their suggestions ignored.  

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    #111688

    Dayton
    Member

    Dog Sxxt,
    I believe that you are saying use the right tool for the circumstances – and that I agree with.
    Vinny

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    #111690

    Mikel
    Member

    If you think I was trying to impress, you are wrong.
    I just want to figure out the conflicting messages from you –
    No more improvement possible and writing materials to train people to make improvement.
    I assume that your message of no improvment possible was bravado and not truth.

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    #111691

    Mikel
    Member

    What nonsense.
    Lean is just a term coined by Womack and his MIT folks to describe what was embraced as JIT or cycle time reduction by others before the book The Machine that Changed the World was written.

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    #111693

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    You have to know pretty well for both six sigma and lean tools from your hands-on experience, not from reading memory jogger pocket guide and be able to deploy them effectively under different circumstances. One of our consulting team members is an ex-M Black Belt trainer who is underrate lean tools and too pride with Six Sigma. I got hard time to change his mind whom believe lean is not a big deal. :-)

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    #111694

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    For your record, every lean tool can be applied in administrative process. You have to make use your imagination power and lean skills.

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    #111696

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Agree, not fit-one-to-all perfect strategy for all companies. I personally will sell lean comes first and then tie in with SS to companies with have no strong quality improvement culture in the past. Lean is easy to learn with few statistics jargons. You can see the results fast and be able to keep the momentum rolling before you introduce SS to tackle process capability and quality issues.
    One guy from aerospace industry told me that he cannot implement JIT because their processes are very unpredictable with stinky quality. Sometimes you have to run lean and six sigma parallel to avoid chicken or egg comes first kind of never ending argument.

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    #111713

    Mike R.
    Participant

    Wow.  What advice do I have to encourage you in this situation? I’ve tried three times today to write a meaningful response.  I can not do better than this:
    Opposition is not a corporate thing.  It’s as individual as you and me.  We all protect ourselves.  We love to flex our strengths, avoid display of our personal weaknesses, and strive to minimize risk and pain.
    Don’t blame your management for being weak and contradictory of their own stated desires.  They’re just as afraid as you and I that they are one bad decision away from termination.  They have less of an ability to cover up their mistakes. 
    There is only one way to be happy working… work for a person whose goals you respect and values you can enthusiastically support.  Those leaders are few.  Since that is not always an option, happiness must come from local, personal victories.  Be true to yourself.  Refuse to lie to your customers.  Encourage and grow others.  Be amazing, in every situation.  Rejoice always.  Be upbeat and thankful for every situation.  Represent the truth at all times.  Strength with humility and integrity without fail will always overcome the fear and uncertainty in others, as well as within ourselves.
    There’s a great book that talks about all this in detail.
    Be strong.
    Mike
     

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    #111767

    EdG
    Participant

    I like and agree with Ron’s concise discription of Lean and Six Sigma.
    Additionally, I agree and disagree with what Dog Sxxt mentioned in a previous post.  I would word “Lean is an interpretation of what TPS is” but not “a copycat of the TPS.”  Hence because it is an interpretation, some books miss (or omit) the soft side to TPS.  But, not all lean books.
    A wise individual discribed TPS as “everything we do is with the intent of establishing an environment that allows our people to immediately distinguish the normal from the abnormal.”  I would say that this discription applies to ALL of the tools within Lean (and many within Six Sigma).
    I hope this thread continues some more, I found it very interesting this evening.

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    #111821

    NewBB
    Participant

    I also found this to be an interesting thread, devoid of the sarcasm and  that sometimes creeps into Forum discussion. From this brief dialogue I found that I want to learn more about the Lean tools and how I may apply at least some of them to a transactional environment.
    Thanks guys

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    #111829

    ed pierzynski
    Participant

    I agree with some of the other postings. We started out with several 1 week Kaizen events that brought people from the ‘concept’ to ‘convert’ stage. We utilized DMAIC, process maps, failure analysis, fishbone ,etc and addressed the ‘low hanging fruit’ of the project. That is, we picked off the easiest and most productive aspects of the project. We then held formalized Six Sigma Green belt and Black belt training and conducted a number of projects, over a period of months. Also using DMAIC and all the other tools, but a lot more of the metrics and utilization of Minitab.
    As we formed a structure to our projects and reorganization to address it, it became clear that most process changes could not wait for a full blown six sigma project. As with most businesses, we needed more reactive and quicker fixes. Thus, we have started using a combination of both philosophies. In fact, there is not a lot of differences between the two, and that is why you see all the references toLean/Six Sigma. Most companies have seen the merit of both eliminating steps, waste and error but many can’t or won’t wait for results. Thus, some times you need to pick the low hanging fruit and sometimes you prune, fertilize, measure, and water. Both methods will probably get you fruit, but you need to look at the process and your resources and decide which is appropriate for your situation, and your boss.

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    #111845

    Mike R.
    Participant

    I like your attention to urgency and “voice of the boss”, but I hear a lot about the cumbersome nature of a “full” Six Sigma project fro you and others.
    Does using the roadmap HAVE to be SLOW?  I think not.  Does it HAVE to be tedious?  I hope not.  Why do SO many Black/Green Belts think that Six Sigma is bulky?
    Please help me with this.
     

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    #111855

    Jonathon Andell
    Participant

    I have learned some excellent new tools which beautifully compliment my Six Sigma aresnal. And vice versa.I like using “takt time” and control charts of cycle time to enhance each other’s contribution to process insight.I use load leveling to reduce varation in cycle time.I use statistical forecasting to help set just-in-time inventory levels.Just a few examples. More available upon request.

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    #111864

    Mikel
    Member

    Do you actually have a clue what you are talking about?

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    #111865

    Mike R.
    Participant

    As question: do you use these tools in the DMAIC framework?  If so, how? 
    Load leveling seems to be a focussed solution generator would that be used in Improve or throughout M-A-I-C?
    I assume that Takt time is a tool in Analyze to test the effect of various inputs on variation.  Does the takt time tool give you a p-value, or do you hav eto move to ANOVA and regression to determine statistical significance?
    Thanks,
    Mike R.

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    #111866

    Mike R.
    Participant

    Yes.
    Someone who also has a clue will answer.  Just watch.
    Mike

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    #111868

    Mikel
    Member

    If you have a clue, then why the stupid question about p values and takt time?It’s scarey that you are a consultant.

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    #111870

    Mike R.
    Participant

    bla bla bla me stan me,  me me me. Answer the question, oh sage, or please don’t post.
    You don’t even have a Green Belt, do you?  If you don’t, which you don’t, get out of the way.  The forum will post.
    Find meaning Stan.  You continue to have none here. Have you considered stalking?

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    #111876

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Mike R Hill
    Lean looks at overall flow of products i.e. trying to reduce work in progress leadtime and final product leadtime. If you introduce pull systems (kanbans), then one looks at controllling the flow of product from point of manufacture to point of use without overproducing i.e. making what is needed when it is needed and not overproducing. My previous company made parts whether or not the next stage of production needed it or not. This “extra” product went and “sat” in the warehouse. The cost on work in progress was huge. The accountants thought we had lots of value in the warehouse, but little did they realise it was money being tied up in WIP. By the way our costings system used to drive and help such build up of WIP. Coupled with kanbans go the control of work. Scheduling of works orders take place on the shop floor and there is then no need for a planning department to issue works orders to the shop floor i.e. reduced scheduling and paper flow.
    Lean also looks at how one will change dies and tools a lot quicker (called SMED-single minute excahange of dies). If you can change a machine quicker from one die to the next then one can justify smaller batches and more change overs. Smaller batches means reduced product leadtimes. Reduced leadtimes means happier customers. Smaller batches also means less “holding stock” value and money tied up in stock is released for other use. We worked our holding stock value and at one stage it was around 21% of the value of the stock. Interest rates were very high at that stage i.e. 15%(bank lending rates).
    The concept of level scheduling says that if I make products A, B and C in say the following quantities A-100, B-50 and C-25, then from a Lean aspect we should try to make A-50, B-25 and C-12 and then repeat the cycle of A-50, B-25 and C-12. If you look at a typical triangle depicting the quantity of product for the 1st scenario above versus the 2nd then what happens is that one is carrying less stock with shorter leadtimes and so your holding stock value will go down. The accountants like this and so do customers who always have the product they need. You also ensure that you have a good mix of product always leaving the factory. Imagin you want to purchase a BMW 316I and when you get to the factory they are busy making a BMW 318I and will only change over to produce 316’s in a while. You will then have to wait. There are more aspects.
    Anyway these are just three concepts that I have applied. If i then looks at six sigma aspects then I look at the machine/process itself. I want to then ensure quality at source from a peace of equipment that is optimised and repeatable in its process.By the way having a repeatable process is critical in the pharmaceutical industry. The auditors will look for this repeatability. I am in the pharmaceuticals by the way. So lean might look more at the bigger picture where as six sigma will look closer to the actual process/machine itself. This you should know more than myself.
    A little long winded but hope this helps.
    Johnny 

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    #111879

    Mike R.
    Participant

    Johnny,
    Not long-winded at all.
    Thanks for the response.  You obviously know your systems well and care about the results.  You have been a great help.
    God bless,
    Mike

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    #111893

    Mikel
    Member

    miker,
    If you want to compare knowledge or experience, let’s go.
    You bring a really mixed message. You have superior knowledge and are a consultant. You work for an organization where further change is not possible and you are writing training material to train people to improve. Some vauge rant last night about Six Sigma not having to be slow. A question about p values on takt time (how clear is it that you don’t have a clue about takt time?). Some religous rant about you combining your personal views into your training (DMAIBA).
    Make up your mind – either you are a professional with superior knowledge – if you are stop the stupid comments, inappropriate imposition of your personal views, and questions that show a loack of knowledge; or you are a light weight with a vague view of what it takes to be a consultant – if so identify yourself as such and I’ll leave you alone.
    WWJD? – be honest with himself about who he is and what he knows.

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    #111894

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    Good morning to you too!  Still don’t have anything meaningful to contribute?  Mot surprised, just disappointed.
    Save your keystrokes next time.  We are all quite unimpressed.

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    #111896

    Darth
    Participant

    Mike R, could  you please explain the use of takt time to determine statistical significance?  That is quite a new application of the concept and I would be interested in learning how you can get a p-value from Takt time.  I get a sense from your post that you are suggesting that takt time is a precursor to the use of ANOVA and regression.  Thanks for sharing.

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    #111898

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Darth
    Is takt time not the time a factory/process needs to “tick” at or produce to line up with the required use (takt) as required by the customer such that ones factory is then making “Just in Time” for customer requirements. With this in place then one does not make what is not needed or build up unnecessary finish goods in a warehouse.
    I am lost and if so what is the link with with the p-value.
    Johnny

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    #111901

    Darth
    Participant

    Hey Johnny, hope all is well in SA.  Read Mike R’s post in which he asks about takt time and p value before going to ANOVA and regression. 
    I am trying to get him to explain the relationship since he made the statement with such authority and I am curious as to his thinking on the subject.

    0
    #111907

    johnnyrob
    Participant

    Darth – you are a minx – even Mike R cant turn takt time into a P value

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    #111909

    Sigmordial
    Member

    We could set up a hypothesis test for this.  Identify the constraint, then formulate the following statements for a 1 sample test:
    Ho: Cycle Time at constraint = Takt TimeHa: Cycle Time at constraint < Takt Time
    Then collect data using cycle time studies at your constraint.  Type of test would be driven by the shape and variability of the data.

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    #111910

    Mike R.
    Participant

    I’m just probing this idea myself.  I am trying to arrange a marriage between lean tools and traditionally used six sigma tools.  I chose takt time as a starting point since most of us understand it to a degree.  For simplicity, let’s use this definition: the time it takes to complete a single iteration of a process.
    Since frequency (histogram type) variable data can be used to generate hypothesis test results, takt time qualifies.  You are correct.  I’m using the technique of takt time data collection to feed capability, ANOVA, and regression analyses.  That’s all.  Not much of an apocalypse.
    My problem is determining where the lean art can add value to the way I have come to use Six Sigma.  From my original post:
    “Now it seems that LEAN Six Sigma is going to be the wave of the future.  What does LEAN offer me?  I have process mapping skills that allow me to address waste.  I call waste VOC and assign inputs to the steps that cause it.  What will I learn from LEAN?  LEAN-SS veterans, what have you learned?”
    The two thoughts on how LeAN tools might help my Six Sigma aret
    a. LEAN prepares the organization by introducing or reemphasizing the importance of standardized work, introduces poke yoke, and emphasizes efficiency (VSM and 5S)
    b.  It ADDS tools like Poke yoke and VSM to the Six Sigma tool box.
    Is there more?  Am I missing something big, some big idea, some synergy?  I don’t like the LEAN 6S approaches I’ve seen, but I can’t quite put my finger on how to improve the situation.
    Thanks for a substantive reply.
    Mike
    Here’s the real problem Darth.  Back to my original post

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    #111911

    Mikel
    Member

    We implies more than one. You appear to be standing alone.
    I am not trying to impress you, just trying to humble you. Your eluding to religion implies a humbleness that you don’t seem to possess. You started here with bravado and name calling (go back and look at your posts); you wanted to self proclaim MBB status; you are deeply engaged in a converssation that you apparently haven’t taken the time to read the basics (Lean).
    You are here to learn I assume. Act like it.
    And if you are here to profess a religion – actions speak louder than words.

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    #111912

    Mikel
    Member

    What a load of pxxp.
    Takt time is a line loading technique based on the assumption of Standard Work and dictated by customer demand. By definition the variation of Takt time = 0 (the line moves to a customer demand). Stop trying to dream up relationships that are meaningless and go learn Lean.
    The relationship of Lean to Six Sigma? Lean preceeds Six Sigma if you want to be efficient. Responsiveness is the dominate measure of an organization. Use Six Sigma tools where variation is the cause of responsiveness issues. Use Lean principles everywhere.
    What are the two best variation reduction tools? Standard Work and SMED. Do you understand why?

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    #111913

    Mikel
    Member

    It’s part of the new DMAIBA curriculum. You will have to wait for the book.

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    #111917

    JBeckly
    Participant

    “I am not trying to impress you, just trying to humble you.”Oh just what we need, an internet message board jerkoff trying to “humble” others. Stan, you are just another useless waste of bandwidth. Do you actually work? Or do you spend all day copying/pasting internet articles and textbooks here? You are pathetic…

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    #111918

    Mikel
    Member

    Thank you for your kind remarks.
    Yes I do work and when I do, I don’t post. Thank you for your concerns, I will take them under advisement.
    What was your point anyway?

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    #111920

    Mikel
    Member

    M. Battle, L. Teare, S. Law, J. Fulton, J. Beckly, S. Lewis, A L D’Souza, C Rajkumar, J Cooke, and C J BulpittProbiotics and antibiotic associated diarrhoeaBMJ, October 19, 2002; 325(7369): 901 – 901. [Full Text]  I was wondering what your interest was – it must have been miker’s use of the word constipation.

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    #111922

    Mikel
    Member

    Darth,
    Have you taken to dressing up like a school girl like our friend Reigle? From the dictionary –

    minx
    noun {C} SLIGHTLY OLD-FASHIONED USUALLY HUMOROUS

    a girl or young woman who knows how to control other people to her advantage

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    #111925

    Sigma Wolf
    Member

    Mike,
    Hate to do this to you but I think there’s a small mistake in one of your statements.  Takt time isn’t the time it takes to complete a single iteration.  Cycle time is.  Takt is how often I need to complete it.  In Simple laymans terms:
    Takt time.  How often I need to produce a part to meet customers demands
    Cycle time.  The amount of time it takes me to produce one part. 
     
    Therefore, there won’t be any variation in Takt time, unless your customer demands change, in which case you’ll use flexible manning or machinery to adjust to this.
     
    There will be variation in cycle time, however.  And you can use this to determine areas of issue or concern.  for example if the mean of your cycle is greater than your takt, then you can’t produce enough parts and will either need to spend on overtime or eventually shut your customers down.
    I’ve been in the automotive industry a long time, and I’ve taught TPS (JIT), Lean and Six Sigma.  The advantage to knowing all three disciplines is that I can use the Six Sigma tools to help verify  improvements on my Lean Projects, so it’s easier to get management buy off.  The flip side is I use a lot of the Lean Principles in the improve and control phase of my Six Sigma Projects.  The two can co-exist and compliment each other very well in a manufacturing environment.  Just think outside the box on how to use the two together.

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    #111926

    Darth
    Participant

    Stan, this is why you are my idol…nothing escapes you.  Yes, sometimes I do post as a 14 y/o professed grand daughter of Bill Smith just to see what kind of thread I can start.

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    #111927

    Darth
    Participant

    Nice try Siggy.  Despite your vain attempt, you still can’t make any sense out of Mike R’s post regarding p value and Takt time.  My guess is that he is not as familiar with Lean as he purports.  Looks like you and MJones are working together today since you posted within 3 minutes of each other.  Must be one of those workshop things again.  Hope all is well.

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    #111936

    Mike R.
    Participant

    Dear Mr. Wolf,
    Hey.  I’m here to learn.  I never claimed to know everything.  Quite the opposite.  There’s only one person who seems determined to hang that label on me.  Those of you who have read my posts know what I’m about.  No apology necessary.
    I spent some time with our lean guys here, and they got me straightened out on cycle time, WIP, takt time, Little’s Law, lead time, and the like.  Yes, I did some research.  Sorry to disappoint you Vinny.
    The question remains: Do I want to use data generated by lean tools in capability calculations and AVOVA analyses and such?  The answer seems to be yes.  So.  I see three ways that lean and SS mesh:
    1.  use Six Sigma tools to verify your lean improvements (per Mr. Wolf)
    2.  use lean principles in Improve and Control to fashion the best solutions(new processes with fewer non-value added steps, poke yoke, process leveling), can you then also use Six Sigma tools to draw statistical
    3?  use lean tools to generate data (where classic Six Sigma tools are weaker) to feed Analyze tools such as  hypothesis tests to verify critical inputs.
    Hasn’t someone figured this out by now??? 
    Is point 3 a waste of time?  Is the data from lean so sparse and isolated as to add no insight?  Is there a fourth overlap? a fifth?.  (If someone doesn’t make a joke about alcohol, I’ll be disappointed).
    Thanks,
    Mike
    P.S.  Your “think out-of-the-box” comment might be the only meaningful answer..
    Stan, have a ball with this one.
    Mike

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    #111938

    Mike R. Hill
    Participant

    From my very first post:
    “Since I am LEAN-challenged (not trained in LEAN), I have adapted the DMAIC approach to solve ALL my problems.  The only difference between projects has been the speed of attack, the number of tools used, and the breadth of organizational involvement. 
    Now it seems that LEAN Six Sigma is going to be the wave of the future.  What does LEAN offer me?” 
    Vinny,/ Darth, has Stan got YOU believing that I’m a big headded ass too?  Just proves the old addage.  Repeat a lie loud and long enough and it becomes the truth.
    I just come for answers.  Despite the character attacks, I’m getting some clarity.  Thanks McD, SigmaWolf,  Adam, et al. 
    A challenge to you, Stan, since you seem to be the most bent.  Clip my arrogance from my postings and collect it in one place.  I’d like to see it.   Forum can decide.  Title it: “Is Mike A Pompous Butthead?” or something.  It’ll be FUN!
    Mike

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    #111939

    Mikel
    Member

    This is not a popularity contest, I’ve given you the highlights.
    Do you know why Standard Work and SMED are great variation reduction tools?

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    #111944

    Mike R.
    Participant

    No.  Please tell me. 

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    #111947

    Mikel
    Member

    Ah, Grasshopper. Life is one of discovery. When you think you know, come and try to snatch the pebble.
    And I do appreciate the lack of foul language in your most recent post in this public forum.

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    #111948

    Darth
    Participant

    I know, I know!!!!  Pick on me???  Wonder if we know that SMED stands for Single Minute Exchange of Dies or something like that.  Duhhhh, standard work…everybody doing the work in a standard way…hummmmmm will that reduce variation?  Getting changeover time to “one minute”…..I wonder how that reduces setup time variation.  I’m just guessing.

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    #111950

    Mikel
    Member

    Yes, you are just guessing and you got half of the problem right.
    You have interpreted one of the two tools too literally. I won’t say which one but it does contain an acronym.
    Please rethink your answer.

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    #111953

    Darth
    Participant

    That’s why I put the “one minute” in quotes.  An actual one minute is a bit too literal, I agree. 
    Single Minute Exchange of Die. One of Lean tools that reduces the changeover time. It has a set of procedures to be followed for a successful implementation. Some Advantages:Setup reduction and fast, predictable setups enable Lean Manufacturing. Setup reduction reduces setup cost, allows small lot production, smoothes flow, and improves kanban

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    #111955

    Mikel
    Member

    and for those who actually achieve SMED, the process is always put on target (reduces drastically that nasty shift stuff).
    Now be quiet and stop showing off and see if miker can figure it out.

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    #111969

    Mike R.
    Participant

    I would give it a try, but I’ll ask someone who is interested in teachiing me. 
    This stuff is not rocket science.  Stan, if you consider yourself a guru, you are master of  little.  With your cache of tidbits held so dear, you hug and hide them like a child, incapable of honest dialog.  I sense you fear that you would not hold up well under the scritiny of those you abuse.  You’re not even very articulate. Does that bother you?
    “Square One” was yet another successful refute of your empty accusations.  Offering no evidence of anything you assert, your credibility, thought to be at it’s smallest, shrinks even further. 
    I will abandon this now.  My game with you all has run it’s course.  I’ll continue to respond to others, but leave it to others to point out the obvious transparency of your half-information and reckless intent.  Flail away at me.  I will not flinch.  The fact that you feel threatened by me says much about you that others should know. 
    I’ll be praying for you.
    Mike

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    #111981

    EdG
    Participant

    All,
    This has been quite the interesting thread; at least it has been at times. For various reasons.
    Now maybe I am thinking about this too simplistically, and if that is the case I do apologize. However…
    Mike,
    It appears that you wish to have a “one size fits all answer” on a very specific question that you can then apply to all given scenarios in the future. Unfortunately, what I have learned from our Lean Experts their typical answer to those types of questions is, “It depends.” Which I don’t think you want to hear. Sigma Wolf hit the nail as close to “on the head” as I think anyone is going to. The advantage to knowing all three disciplines is that I can use the Six Sigma tools to help verify improvements on my Lean Projects, so it’s easier to get management buy off. The flip side is I use a lot of the Lean Principles in the Improve and Control phases of my Six Sigma Projects. The two can co-exist and compliment each other very well in a manufacturing environment. Just think outside the box on how to use the two together. To meet the desired need, use the appropriate tool.
    I have a bunch of tools in my garage. Some I use for woodworking and some for mechanic type activities. Does it really mater which grouping I put my ¼” electric drill in? Sometimes I use it for woodworking and sometimes for mechanic work. Sometimes I use it in my backyard and sometimes I take it over to a friend’s place to help him out. Who cares if I call it a woodworking tool or a mechanic’s tool? As long as when I need it, I am smart enough to recognize I need it and proficient enough too properly use it.
    My point is, quit being so concerned about using Lean tools in a Six Sigma Project or Six Sigma tools in a Lean Event. Why don’t you learn about all of those tools, establish the scientific problem solving approach you wish to use (a standard like PDCA, or DMAIC, or 5-Why, or “Billy Bob’s Sure Fire Way of Fixing Problems”), determine what needs must be met, use the appropriate tools to meet these needs, and begin improving the methods in which you use to meet (or don’t meet) your customer’s needs?
    Like I started out, maybe I am looking at things just too simplistic but it seems like some of this thread has made things more confusing. Vice, less.
    EdG-
    Stan,
    Just curious but, would you also add TPM to a tools set from lean that helps in reducing variation? How about Visual Management, including 5S? Poka-yoke? A3 reporting? Hoshin Kanri usage? Kanbans?
    Regardless of what might be argued as the “primary purpose” of using these tools, isn’t a byproduct a more stable process and in turn less variation? ß A question to everyone that has been reading this thread. 
    Maybe I’m crazy, but I don’t understand why folks have been making things more complicated than they need to be…

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    #111983

    johansson
    Participant

    If it’s more simple than it looks, that’s good!  It was getting a little thick, reading some things that seemed like Mike realy only just does need to go brush up on some basic lean and then use the toos if they work for the problem at hand.
    Is this forum always so critical of contributors.  Some people seem kind of unprofessional and get off the topic at times.

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    #111984

    Bill Stokman
    Participant

    I see one of the main benefits of the Lean Six Sigma integration in the transactional arena. Transactional or Business processes are usually filled with more waste than they are with defects. Lean is typically more ‘delivery’ or ‘waste’ focused and SS is typically more ‘quality’ or ‘defect focused. On transactional projects having both tool sets is key.Lean and Six Sigma T together so strongly that I have a hard time even seperating them anymore – I spent several years doing lean work and then over half a decade doing six sigma. Why did we not blend them 6 or 7 years ago?? I kick myself.Bill Stokman, MBB, Lean Expert, Principal with the AIT Group

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    #111986

    Mikel
    Member

    Yes I would include TPM as a variation reduction tool. Done right, TPM will look for the first sign of process degradation.
    All the rest of the tools I would put in the communication / controls category.

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    #111988

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Darth
    All is very well and extremely hot in SA. Have not heard from Mike C. Maybe he is lost down the mine shaft.
    I agree with your advantages for set up reduction. In my attempts to reduce set up time I used a time lapse camera which enables one to define all the steps in the set up and time taken for each step. Then one must try and take as much of the “internal set up” and make it into “external set” i.e. dont fetch tools during the set but prepare needed tools before the set up takes place. Then the rest is about comming up with better options for set up i.e. quick release couplers for oil circulation on an injection mould tool instead of nuts and screws etc etc.
    Whne you gonna visit SA-lots of six sigma opportunities here.
    Johnny

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    #111989

    Mikel
    Member

    Aw Miker,
    Life is full of mysteries and I am the only one in here trying to teach you. Too bad you don’t get it.
    This stuff may not be rocket science, but then again neither is rocket science and you clearly don’t know what you don’t know (quote from Mikel or some French philosopher).
    Save your prayers for someone who wants them.
    See you tomorrow sweety.

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    #111990

    Mikel
    Member

    Johnny,
    You did not ask, but you are missing the greatest value of SMED. Those that do SMED do their changes with no adjustments and absolute minimal (usually none) checking.
    After your internal / external analysis you achieved 50 – 70 % time reduction and declared success. If you did the same exercise again you would get another 50%. But you still are doing extensive checking (probably to spec, not to target) and adjustment.
    Think of SMED as set up with no adjustment during the internal time. You learn to do that, you will learn how to take your processes to target everytime.

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    #111991

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Darth
    I read Mike’s post and the rest of the thread. OK now I know why you were asking him the question. I am right about the meaning of “takt” time. We have always used the word customer “cycle” time here in SA. When I heard the word takt I knew it meant what I undertood as customer cycle time. By the way I have never seen any factory here in SA running to any takt time with parts being delivered JIT to the line. Its all theory here-managers are just petrified by the word JIT or lean for that matter.
    regards
    Johnny

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    #111993

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    Stan
    Thanks for the info. I have had some experience with SMED but not extensive stuff. Here in SA people are scared of the word JIT or LEAN. The opportunity to implement such ideas in my current (and previuos) position has been difficult. I am actually busy with equipment and process validation-a little different from LEAN. I was very focused and read a lot about JIT when i first started working. It seemed a while ago that LEAN had died a good death. But from this forum its seems very much alive. I want to keep up with what happening in the lean and six sigma world, and so I appreciate your input.
    Johnny

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    #111994

    melvin
    Participant

    DMAIC is taught by too many counsultants as a fill in the box / use the tool approach.  That combined with the tacit message from first project through months of training lead to long cycle times.  What are the poor newby Project Leaders to think?
    You have to reeducate them into understanding the objectives of projects & to push the speed of execution.
    Bob

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    #112000

    Mikel
    Member

    Take the time to hook up with Mike Carnell sometime. He is one of the best and definitely understands.

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    #112001

    Johnny Guilherme
    Participant

    I have already. He has been at my home and got me some literature on six sigma- “The six sigma way team fieldbook” and another two. I am busy reading the six sigma way team fieldbook and it seems really good. He will still be in SA for a while and I have plans for him to come a give a talk to our CEO and other directors on six sigma.
    regards

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    #112002

    Mike R.
    Participant

    Thank you for the post.
    I teach that Six Sigma is largely project management.  Not “advanced” project management… there is no such thing as “advanced”.. you’re either managing it or you’re not.
    Mike

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    #112003

    EdG
    Participant

    Max,
    Like I mentioned, maybe I am looking at things too simplistically but if I don’t then I get myself confused.  I’ll also remind you of my previous post in this thread, “…establishing an environment that allows our people to immediately distinguish the normal from the abnormal.”  Look at all of the tools and principles within the realm of Continuous Improvement (Lean, Six Sigma, etc.).  Aren’t they all trying to afford those “on the floor” to be able to react to real-time information and make the appropriate correction?  “To do the right thing?”  So that ultimately “the customer gets what they want, when they want it, with the highest quality and at the best price.”
    Good luck and keep having fun, EdG

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    #112005

    Mike R.
    Participant

    This is exactly what I mean.  When Sigma Wolf (later in this thread) says he uses 6S tools to verify lean improvements, I assume he does this.  Wolf?  A low p-value for a t-Test comparing old vs. new methods, or regression with cycle time as a response and any continuous input as predictor suits the requirement.
    The examples above really don’t need lean… cycle time is an output of each step in the detailed process map and of the over-all process, so 6s will get you that data.  BUT, doing a kaizen might lead you to the suggested improvements more quickly, and enable you to do a comparison that you otherwise would not know to make until after the rigors of measure phase.
    That’s the answer I was looking for. Not rocket science, but still.
    Amazing.  You actually CAN use takt time as part of a hypothesis test.  and get a p-value.  But I guess, ANYone who knew lean and had even a Green Belt, would see that pretty quickly.
    Thanks,
    Mike
     

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    #112006

    EdG
    Participant

     Stan,
    Would you agree on these?
    Lean folks would say, “Through the reduction or elimination of waste within my process, I am improving the process and thereby better serving my customer.”  However with that as the primary focus of their activities, a byproduct is reduced variation (due to a more stable process).
    Six Sigma folks would way, “Through the reduction or eliminate of process variation, I am improving the process and thereby better serving my customer.”  However with that as the primary focus of their activities, a byproduct is a reduction in the waste of resources and time (due to a more stable process).
    If so then why can’t we just look at things as???  “I need to better serve my customer.  And I’ll do that by looking at how I serve my customer (my processes), understand what is the root cause of why I am not meeting their needs.  Apply the appropriate analysis techniques to ensure I am addressing the root cause and not merely a symptom.  Then apply the appropriate tools to fix my problems, apply my countermeasures, or instill improvements.”
    Am I being too naive or simple?  If I am, then I don’t understand why things need to be so complicated.  Your thoughts…
    EdG

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    #112007

    EdG
    Participant

    Mike,
    One simple quesiton.  Why do you have too use an hypothesis test to prove statistical significance in the difference between your takt time and cycle time?
    If there is a valid reason (answer to my question) then I would suppose you have to do it.  I can’t “tell” if there is a difference, I must have statistical proof, Management wants proof…  But if there isn’t a valid reason to do it, then why do it?
    I already know that if any of my cycle times throughout the process exceed my takt time, then I will not be able to meet my customer’s needs.  So if 999,999 products produced all have cycle times throughout the process under takt time then they all will meet my customer’s needs.  But that last one had (for some reason) a cycle time in the process that exceeded takt time, then that 1 unit will not meet my customer’s needs in time.  (I use cycle time to discribe the total time required to complete a phase or step in the process, as opposed to the total production lead time.) 
    If takt time was 50 seconds and the actual cycle time for phase X in my process was >50 seconds, I don’t need to use statistics to prove I just exceeded takt time.  It is a fact, we were over takt time.  My basic math skills are adequate to tell me this.  Now this one unit will not meet my customer’s needs (assuming that you can not make up the time somewhere else in the process).
    Good luck…

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    #112008

    Sigma Wolf
    Member

    Mike,
    We do use Six Sigma Tools to verify Lean Improvements.  Anything from a simple Hypothesis Test the new is better than the old, to Anova to insure the new process does not have too much variation. 
    Another way the SS tools have helped Lean here.  We worked a Lean Project on managing our customers orders.  One customer has several different combinations of parts.  (47 component numbers combined for about 12,000 pcs per day)  They issue a broadcast telling us what they will pull each month.  We break this pbroadcast out into a run per day.  Basic Lean Level Loading.  Then the customer will over pull on some parts early in the month and under pull some others.  We would knee jerk and shut down the parts they were underpulling.  Later in the month we would get caught light and have to work overtime.  So we were doing a Lean project to smooth this out, but decided to use a regression to predict which parts fluctuate together.  Now we know if they are heavy on one certain component, we can predict with about 93% accuracy, which components will fluctuate up or down with it, and which days those fluctuations will happen.  So it goea deeper than just using basic Hyp testing to help Lean. 
     
    And a footnote about me.  I am a BB first.  I just help out a lot with the Lean Team here. 

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    #112012

    Darth
    Participant

    Amazing.  You actually CAN use takt time as part of a hypothesis test.  and get a p-value.  But I guess, ANYone who knew lean and had even a Green Belt, would see that pretty quickly.
    Ok, Mike, please state the null and alternate hypothesis for your test.

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    #112014

    Sigma Wolf
    Member

    Hope you don’t mind Mike
     
    Ho-mean cycle </= takt
    H1-mean cycle > Takt.
    One Sample T

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    #112017

    Darth
    Participant

    Three questions:
    1.  Mean cycle time of what?  Overall or longest task?
    2.  What are the underlying assumptions for using the t-test?
    3.  What is the most likely distribution for cycle time?
    Are you sure about how you have written the statements?  Isn’t the general form hoping for the rejection of the Null?

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