iSixSigma

Kanban in an inheriant batch process

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Kanban in an inheriant batch process

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #47367

    Aaron Overbeek
    Participant

    I’m having trouble trying to create a Kanban supermarket for my plastic injection molding department for both internal and external customers.  I’ve researched both historical data and forecast data to come up with the family’s CV for demand segmentation and calculated the number of lots and lot quantities.
    We use the mold blocks with four sections (so we can produce four different parts at the same time).  My questions are…”how can I utilize all four mold sections without scheduling (using my forecast)” and “how can I avoid having only 1 part to mold out of a family of like-parts?”

    0
    #157894

    annon
    Participant

    Aaron,
    I am a bit obtuse, bear with me.  Are you saying that you have an inherent batch size of 4 and need to know how do your use this batch quantity in such a way as to avoid:

    Overproduction (ie you need 1 part type or sku, not 4) or
    Underutilization  (ie you run the machine for only 1 part, losing 75% of its capacity)
    The result of which is a difficulty in managing your pull system?

    0
    #157895

    Aaron Overbeek
    Participant

    Exactly; without buying more mold cavities, how can I utilize my processes?

    0
    #157900

    annon
    Participant

    What is the machine cycle time to run single batch (ie 1 out of 4 cavities) and how does that relate to your takt time?  Perhaps pursuing a strategy of minimizing setup times in order to get the cycle below takt would allow single piece flow, and serial alignment….and future machining could be right-sized.
    If you cant get around the fixed batch size, then what about using a FIFO chute, using takt and cycle times (4 out of 4) to determine a chute size based on a batch size of four? 
    Just spit balling here….good luck. 

    0
    #157901

    Aaron Overbeek
    Participant

    Thanks!

    0
    #157906

    gt
    Participant

    u can start with 2.5 times average deviation of the demand

    0
    #157914

    GrayR
    Participant

    Without knowing the distribution of parts this may be off-target somewhat — but it works if you have a small number of parts that make up the majority of your parts.  (e.g., 20% of your part numbers make up 60% of your volume). Divide your parts into high/ medium/ low volume.  Level production of the high volume parts into a min/max kanban. The leveled quantities are based on past usage and projections of changes in future demand.  Leveling eliminates/minimizes the scheduling needs — same volume at same frequency (monthly, but preferrably weekly or daily) and timing (e.g., start 2 pm on Tuesday).  The low volume parts, depending upon frequency of use, may not be kanban-type items, and you may have to make to order. So there is no forecasting at all for these parts — schedule as they are ordered. These two actions are relatively straightforward, and should be easily accomplished.
    The medium volume parts are the ones that fall into JIT/kanban management.  But since you have addressed most of the volume as discussed above, you now have less of an issue to address with scheduling.

    0
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.