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lack of concentration

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General lack of concentration

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  • #49530

    GHADI
    Participant

    Hello
    I have a situation , of lacking concentration and what ever i memorise just passes by . i need a solution to over come this situation .i have tried all means possible but none worked efficient .
    best regards
    Ghadi  

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    #169391

    sirisri
    Member

    Dear Mr Ghadi,
    Try an age old method and that is Whatever you try to memorise, write down on a piece of paper without seeing.
    Regards

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    #169392

    Spielberg
    Member

    Take Gensing concentrate (3 pills a day)

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    #169399

    Brandon
    Participant

    I have the same problem with my Lack of Interest in other people’s shortcomings.

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    #169409

    Spielberg
    Member

    You should try to help if you can

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    #169412

    Mikel
    Member

    Drink mass quantities of Jack Daniels.It’ll clean you out and then you can go on (paraphrased from Jimmy
    Buffett).

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    #169413

    Taylor
    Participant

    To help promote strong and healthy brain cells one should Drink, it is evolution at its finest and trueist form. By drinking, alcohol enters the blood stream which is fed to the brain, here chemical reactions take place and the weakest brain cells are killed off. This leaves only the strongest cells to multiply thus making you smarter and capable of remembering more. I know what your thinking, sometime as you drink you cant remember anything the next day. But not to worry,  This is due to the fact that short term memory is allocated in the weakest cells while drinking and thus through a bizarre coincidence is the same cells which die off. This is only important if you forget some hot chicks Phone number in this case always write down things while drinking, especially if she is a really hot chick.
    Just trying to help
     

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    #169414

    Brandon
    Participant

    Don’t worry so much about the phone number thing….odds are you won’t meet a hot chick while you’re drunk. Odds go down even further that she’ll give you a correct phone number.

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    #169418

    BTDT
    Participant

    Brandon:I am sitting down at the computer with playing Talking Heads with the bass turned up. I’m right in the middle of summarizing the final Poka Yoke solutions and project benefits. Coming up later in the evening is the preparation of the pitch for the Monte Carlo optimization of a delivery schedule where I strike the best balance between time dependent demand, periodic courier delivery and cycle time. All this is for a meeting at 7:00 am, Monday morning.With so much to do, I find this thread – ironic…. now, where was I?Cheers, Alastair

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    #169419

    Silviu
    Member

    GHADI,
    One approach you can adopt is go see you doctor, you might really be thick. (I don’t think is your case, but just to be on the safe side).
    You gave no information about your workload, projects, tasks, and deadlines… staff that comes strongly with Six Sigma. And here I speak also about my experience: I have sometimes six meetings per day (about different topics) and pages of notes. I also don’t remember it all.
    So second, take a look on the workload you have. Other experienced BB might disagree with me but once here was a discussion about time dedication of BB. Stan said success of a BB strongly depends on the dedication; BB must be 100% dedicated to projects.
    And this is also my case, where I am closing IMPROVE on my first project, in MEASURE with second project and meanwhile I am 100% quality manager.
    Take care
    Silviu
     

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    #169421

    Ron
    Member

    Don’t you mean Ginseng, which is wrong anyway because you ought to have recommended Gingko Biloba.

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    #169424

    Kevin Gerber
    Participant

    A wise man once told me the reason we have a written language is because  not everyone can remember everthing. Sounds like your tring to do to much start writting it down or you can do what i do. I bought a digital voice recorder. Cost about 40$ records up to 60 hours of material.

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    #169425

    Brandon
    Participant

    I know BTDT….but the original post was so “out there” that I couldn’t get serious about it. This is not the place to deal with fundamental limitations such as inability to remember things…if I remember correctly….which I may not.
    My son’s birthday was this week. One of the cards I looked at had two grumpy old men on a park bench. First one said “Why are you looking so grumpy? You own a yellow, turbo-charged Porsche.” Second guy says “I know, but I can’t remember where I parked it!”

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    #169426

    Brandon
    Participant

    Ron, Gingko Biloba…are you kidding. I used to date her and I guarantee you I’m trying to forget!! Now, her sister….WOW!

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    #169427

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    I treid the recorder thing and it worked well, until I forgot where I put it (even after I recorded a message about where I put the recorder). 

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    #169429

    Brandon
    Participant

    Six – you reminded me that I friend told me recently – We all have photographic memories…some of us just have more fillm than others!…or a larger memory card may be more applicable nowdays.

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    #169472

    BC
    Participant

    Brandon,
    Check this out:  http://www.slate.com/id/2114925/
    BC

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    #169475

    Brandon
    Participant

    BC, pretty incredible. Now the question becomes…what can they do with that skill? Is it an end unto itself or is there value in it?
    Appears there are tools one can learn to improve one’s recall capability yet I feel I might get caught up in the process and not be able to translate it into anything of use in what I do. I’ll have to think about that.

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    #169476

    BC
    Participant

    Brandon,
    I don’t know if…crap, I forgot what I was going to say.

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    #169480

    Brandon
    Participant

    BC, that was a good one……who are you again?
    I do remember that’s why I come here…I get a bunch of good laughs amid some snippets of good advice.

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    #169481

    BC
    Participant

    Brandon,
    Brandon,
    Glad to lighten things up a bit.
    Actually, I was intending a more serious response, till the silly bug bit me.  I’ve had experiences where I’ll create my own visualizations in my head (a model) while I’m reading or listening to a discussion or a presentation–a DMAIC review, for example, or a project selection debate.  Visualization is a great way to understand complex relationships because it helps my brain organize.  But the price of doing this is that I’m not listening to all that’s being said.  So what I end up with is a good overall sense of what’s going on, and a good model to present to the team, but poor recollection of the details.  Sort of a tradeoff between memory and concentration, although you’d think they’d go hand in hand. 
    I think there IS something to be learned from the “memory olympics” competitions, that can help us all in our SS careers, since remembering, sorting and visualizing facts and relationships can mean the difference between solving a problem and missing a key relationship.  As for immediate gains to be had from a photographic memory?  I guess you could memorize an encyclopedia and win $$$ on Jeopardy.  Or you could memorize the first hundred digits of the 1.483756473… sigma shift.  Or not…
    Regards,
    BC

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    #169482

    Taylor
    Participant

    See I told you guys, Drinking is the best way to improve memory. I had to read the whole article, but I knew I would find it somewhere.

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    #169483

    BC
    Participant

    Chad,
    I wonder what’s REALLY in that can of Red Bull on Mr Amsuess’s desk?
    BC

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    #169485

    Taylor
    Participant

    Could be a Yager Bomb or one of these tantilizing concoctions from around the country
    “Bull” Drinks
     
    S.O.B.
    No, it’s not what you think. Your mother won’t get offended with this one. It’s Stoli Orange and Red Bull. Served as a highball on the rocks. Ask the guys at Freeskier Magazine about this one. An orange wedge for garnish.
    Bazooka Bull
    It’ll blow your mind out of the canon! It’s Bacardi Limon and Red Bull. Served as a highball on the rocks. Tastes like a Bazooka Joe Bubble Gum.
    Blaster
    It started in Europe and made its way to Denver. Presentation is important with this. A pint glass with a can of Red Bull on top with it’s tab open so that the can will rest on the glass and pour on its own while the bartender pours the Jagermeister into a shot glass. Drop the shot of Jager into the glass of Red Bull and chug. Also known in Breckenridge as a “Bullmeister”.
    Dirty Little Bastard
    Created by some bartenders in Montana, this one consists of a pint glass filled with ice and a shot of Bacardi 151, fill with Red Bull and a float of Jagermeister. Drink it through a straw till it’s gone. Keep your hands on the glass, not the person sitting next to you.
    Depth Charger
    There is some controversy over this one. Whatever they call it, it’s much like the Blaster only you substitute Stoli Vanilla and Grand Marnier for the Jager. Remember, presentation is important. Create fun!
    Chambull
    Simple! Champagne (the real stuff made in France!) mixed with Red Bull. Bring on the bubbles. Champagne glass with a cherry on the bottom.
    Kiss-A-Bull
    A little flava added to the bull. A shot of apple, grape, cherry, watermelon, or peach Pucker and Red Bull. Served as a highball on the rocks. A cherry garnish is a nice touch.
    Tish & Terry
    Created by the bartenders who discovered it in Portland, Oregon. Finlandia cranberry vodka and Red Bull. Served as a highball on the rocks. Lime wedge garnish.
    Bull Royale
    Ladies and Gentlemen alike enjoy this one. A shot of Crown Royal and a half-shot of Amaretto Di Sarrono with Red Bull. Served in a highball on the rocks. Cherry garnish.
    Bullgarita
    A south of the border favorite. Red Bull with Jose Cuervo tequila, triple sec, and lime juice. Salted or unsalted. Served in a hurricane glass on the rocks. Lime wheel garnish.
    Ronin Bull
    Created by a sushi grill and bar in Boulder. Raspberry fused sake, Stoli vodka and Red Bull. Served in a highball on the rocks. Awesome!

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    #169486

    BC
    Participant

    Sounds like I’ll have to do a Pugh Concept Selection exercise this weekend.  Now all I need is a list of criteria:
    1.  Helps my memory (all of them score minuses)
    2.  Helps my concentration (all of them score minuses)
    3.  Makes my car swerve (all of them score pluses)
    4.  Makes me feel better now (all of them score pluses)
    5.  Makes me feel better tomorrow (all of them score minuses)
    Oops, an 11-way tie.  Guess I need to go on to round 2 next weekend!
    BC

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    #169492

    Taylor
    Participant

    More Proof
     The Buffalo Theory        by Cliff Clavin:        I have not seen anyone explain this as well as Cliff Clavin, on “Cheers.”One afternoon at Cheers, Cliff Clavin was explaining the Buffalo Theoryto his buddy Norm. and here’s how he explained it:”Well ya see, Norm, it’s like this… A herd of buffalo can only move asfast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it is theslowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This naturalselection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed andhealth of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of theweakest members.  In much the same way, the human brain can only operateas fast as the slowest brain cells. Excessive intake of alcohol, as weknow, kills brain cells. But naturally it attacks the slowest and weakestbrain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminatesthe weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficientmachine. That’s why you always feel smarter after a few beers.”

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    #169494

    Brandon
    Participant

    It also affects eyesight….thus leading to definition of the term “Coyote Ugly”.

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    #169514

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Chad,
    So, by extension of the concept to the Theory of Constraints by Goldratt, Herbie should be killed and the rest of the scout team will then be able to move faster.  Extending this to process thinking, we should kill the slowest process in the value stream, and then the other processes won’t be subordinated to it.  I can forsee the extinction of the scouts – and it makes a heck of a case for balanced process cycle times.  Hmmm . . . I’ll have to think about this concept.
    Shooter

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    #169516

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Having given this due consideration, I have decided to start the Natural Selection Management System.  A very simple method wherein the slowest employee will be taken out to the back of the building and shot.  Black Belts have nothing to fear, as they will be administering the system, taking the data, and pulling the trigger.  We can claim the savings in reduction of the number of employees, and charge the cost of the bullets to the family of the employee (a method benchmarked from the Chinese penal system for executions).  This would also give my moniker of “Shooter” more meaning.
    Shooter

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    #169519

    zhou
    Participant

    SS Shooter:Your choice of name isn’t very subtle for someone who lives in a country where colleagues routinely shoot each other, and students shoot their class-mates because they’re unpopular. (A point lost on you previously.)In the past you’ve also stated to argue point and counter point is pointless, but I’ll try anyway.Your last post was totally out of order!!!!Lawrence

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    #169524

    Six Sigma Archer
    Member

    Lawerence,
    We also live in a country that has a high rate of death and addiction related to alcohol and drugs.  Drivers routinely kill others in their pursuit of getting drunk.  Are your sensitivities also offended by those who posted that one should drink liberal quantities of Jack Daniels and take drugs in this thread?
    Since my moniker is lost on you, I’ll explain:  I am a target shooter and do so with precision and accuracy.  If you prefer, I can change it to Six Sigma Archer, as I also target shoot with a bow.
    Archer

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    #169525

    Sloan
    Participant

    Stop this bickering, I can’t concentrate!

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    #169527

    BC
    Participant

    Shooter/Archer,
    How about just calling yourself Six Sigma Cowboy.  That has all the negative connotations about our good old USA all wrapped into one word.
    BC

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    #169528

    Six Sigma Cowboy
    Member

    BC,
    Good point.  It also fits my home in Texas, and it fits the western garb worn by Mikel Harry, as well.  The bad part is that I risk offending the cows / steers and the native Americans.  Hope my wife doesn’t find out – she’s part Cherokee, and she’s pretty good with a knife.  The good news is, in my current state of going bald, it won’t be noticed if she scalps me.
    Cowboy

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    #169530

    BC
    Participant

    Shooter/Cowboy,
    Maybe now Lawrence will realize that your Natural Selection Management System wasn’t just a joke.  You were 100% serious.
    Anyway my neighbor was outside target practicing over the weekend.  And we aren’t even in Texas.  We’re in the Great Lakes region.  I guess he was shooting at snowdrifts.  Or maybe snowplows.
    Best wishes, ol’ Cowboy
    BC

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    #169531

    Brandon
    Participant

    Lawrence, unfortunately we can’t have all had the privilege of being born in whatever wonderful country you reside. I presume, where no one commits an atorcity against their fellow countryman.
    However, due to economic limitations, family, friends, church, etc. we are stuck here and must do what we can to minimize the awful things you mention….all this while having to put major efforts into shoring up our borders to minimize illegal entry by all peoples of the world.
    Amazing, isn’t it? How many want to get into this deprived land?

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    #169533

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    BC,
    Actually, the natural selection process is practiced in business to this day, although not as drastic as my admittedly poor attempt at levity.  Jack Welch did so by getting rid of the 10% bottom performers every year.  It was tried at Ford by their former CEO as part of their Six Sigma process (their A, B, C rating system) and it led them into a bunch of lawsuits.  We practice it every day with performance review systems that are ruinous to people and the organization, with the flimsy excuse that one of the reasons we need the performance review system is so that we will know who to lay off when times get bad.  Natural Selection Management System?  We unfortunately use it all the time.
    Shooter

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    #169535

    BC
    Participant

    Shooter,
    Good point!  And I’m sure the unfortunate ones who were let go felt as if they had been shot.  I hope none of them actually shot themselves (maybe some did?).
    “Our people are our greatest asset.”  Imagine a company that actually practices this.
    BC

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    #169537

    Brandon
    Participant

    BC and Six…let’s not be so hard on ourselves. Six is correct, natural and manmade selection is EVERYWHERE! And rightfully it should be.
    Being humanistic, everyone deserves a chance. Not everyone deserves retention….that must be predicated on performance. If not, we could not make progress (depending upon how you want to define progress).
    It’s out there…from nature with its preying on the weakest (note the drinking theory thread) to the dating process to our management of people. I have no problem with it. Man seeks improved performance in everything and that involves some being weeded out.

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    #169542

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Brandon,
    My problem with the performance review system is that they are flawed, in thier application as well as the thinking that goes into them.  The once a year specials are useless.  Worse, they are harmful and really do not achieve their stated aims. 
    When was the last time you heard someone exclaim, “Oh boy, it’s performance review time! I can’t wait!”  That time of year is dreaded by management as well as by the workers.  As a leader, I give real time analysis, coaching and performance improvement mentoring to my people.  Deming has a lot to say about the folly of the performance review system.  It is a demotivator, in most cases.
    Get rid of people who are defiant, refuse to obey the rules, steal, get drunk at work, take drugs, etc., etc?  Sure thing.  I’ll be the first to walk them out the door and say “good riddance to you!”  But to arbitrarily tell someone who plays by the rules, works hard and does their best that they are scum and not needed because we have a policy that says the bottom 10% performers must go?  I’d better take a good look in the mirror and wonder about myself before I do that.
    Shooter

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    #169543

    BTDT
    Participant

    BC:

    It’s pretty standard to depreciate the company’s assets over
    time. The question is whether Belts are classified as “computing
    equipment” at a CCA rate of 45%
    or “data network infrastructure” at a rate of 30%.

    Year
    45%
    30%

    1
    $120,000
    $120,000

    2
    $66,000
    $84,000

    3
    $51,150
    $71,400

    4
    $39,641
    $60,690

    5
    $30,722
    $51,587

    6
    $23,810
    $43,849

    7
    $18,452
    $37,271

    8
    $14,301
    $31,681

    9
    $11,083
    $26,928

    10
    $8,589
    $22,889

    Cheers,
    Alastair

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    #169544

    Sloan
    Participant

    Shooter,
    I agree with you about “annual performance review.” How do we reconcile that concept against the principle that you don’t blame the worker for the results of a poorly designed process?
    My company, like most large companies, has a periodic and annual review process. The stated purpose is so that you know how well you are doing against your goals so that there are no surprises at compensation review time. Nevertheless, I am almost ALWAYS surprised at compensation review time! Try as I do to see the correlation between my work performance and my pay, there is often very little apparent correlation. Some years when I think I’ve had a great year, my compensation is mediocre and some years when I felt I struggled, my compensation was great.
    Fortunately, we got rid of most of the people who thought “MBF” meant “Management By Fear” instead of “Management By Fact.” There are still a few around, but as the trail of dead bodies in their wake continues to grow, they may eventually become a casualty of their own methods.
    We can only hope.

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    #169545

    BC
    Participant

    But Alastair,
    I assume your belts are platform independent, scalable, upgradeable, and portable.  At least up to a certain age, at which point you do a data dump and hope for the best.  So they shouldn’t depreciate. 
    Cheers.
    BC 

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    #169546

    Brandon
    Participant

    Couldn’t agree more Six.
    The majority of the people I’ve managed over the years knew, real time, where they stood. I say majority because I have some flaws as well. Both with walking the walk each day and in flawed judgement on my part…I’ve come to realize in hindsight. People are highly complex units…us included. But ain’t they a kick!

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    #169547

    Alderman
    Participant

    What was this thread all about again… I forgot…

    0
    #169548

    BC
    Participant

    Outlier,
    I’ve learned not to take comp reviews personally.  It depends on the performance of the company, the distribution of comp funds among departments, and the company’s perceived value of you.  Performance seems to have little to do with pay raises, with only some exceptions.
    Kind of like the mistaken notion that people “add value” to a product and the market pays for the “value added”.  No, the market pays what the market perceives the value to be, not how much work was put into the product.
    BC

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    #169549

    Ziggy
    Member

    Think about where performance reviews come from….HR right when was the last time you heard anyone that is competent to say  I think I want to be an HR person…

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    #169550

    Sloan
    Participant

    I agree BC. You and I must work at the same company. I’ve been here for 15 years and I have learned to expect nothing at comp review time. That way anything above nothing is a pleasant surprise. The one constant I have seen is that if you maintain good relationships with your peers, business partners, and managers you usually do OK regardless of the other things in the “performance equation.” (Assuming of course that you are also doing your work.)

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    #169551

    Sloan
    Participant

    This thread has gotten a little bit off the subject, but have you tried Ritalin? I hear it does wonders for concentration.

    0
    #169552

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Brandon,
    Yes, they are a kick and God love them all! 
    There was a book out a few years back by James Hunter (the last name is right – not 100% sure on the first), called “The Servant.”  It was written in the story telling style of “The Goal,” and makes a good case that the job of a leader is to be a servant of their people – and, dare I say, to love them.  We still must manage the business and deal with the hard issues that arise – it’s not all about singing Kumbaya and holding hands – but a good dose of some human decency, kindness and walking a mile in another’s shoes goes a long way, in my opinion.  We all have our own human frailties and shortcomings.  That’s why I view my life as a continual improvement project and it’s a never-ending journey – at least until I assume room temperature!
    Shooter
    Shooter

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    #169553

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Wasn’t it about taking drugs or getting drunk at performance review time or something like that?

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    #169554

    Taylor
    Participant

    Shooter, straight up on the mark. Performance reviews, I believe, are a means for HR to justify their existance. Whats more as a High Mid Level manager, I know most of the people are going to get the same raise regardless of performance which make the review even more of a joke, for both me and the employee. I once gave a supervisor that worked for me the best score possible on all accounts. To this day no one has said anything, which tells me that once it leaves my desk it is a meaningless SIGNED document. When I ask how a company this size could follow such a path of conformity, all I got back was it has to be done. Who says it has to be this way? what a waste.
    Now can we talk about drinking or basketball, or something, getting depressed over here.

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    #169555

    Brandon
    Participant

    Yeah, Ziggy, I’ve got some Ritalin…if I could just remember where I put it. Darn!

    0
    #169556

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Why not talk about baseball!  The season is getting ready to start and we have lots of steroid discussions we can have!  That way, we combine sports, drugs and performance enhancement all in one topic, with some congressional oversite thrown in to make it real interesting.
    Shooter

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    #169557

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    I keep mine in my shirt pocket in a Pez dispenser.  Always handy, easy to use, and camoflaged.  Also, it doesn’tlook unusual when I take them like candy!
    Shooter

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    #169558

    Brandon
    Participant

    OK Six, if we’re going that direction let me say, right off the bat (so to speak) that, regardless of the fact that my personal performance has been spectacular over the last few years, it has nothing to do with the vitamin shots I’ve been taking. Those are strickly meant to be a general health supplement.
    Just don’t want any misconceptions here regardless of who may come forward with a different story.

    0
    #169566

    Taylor
    Participant

    So no one wants to talk about Steriods and Baseball??
    ~my opinion is that the really big stars that have been implicated in HGH/Steriod use, would have been big stars anyway. Barry Bonds, Mark McGuire, Roger Clemens and others are atheletes so far advanced in the skill of the game in which they played not sure you would have noticed any difference. When you look at the number of players around the world that have taken these “drugs” not sure you can make the correlation that these “drugs” truely made a difference in their play. And even if it did how much? So many guys out there that it didn’t help at all.
    One could even make the argument that cortizone is a performance enhancing drug, yet atheletes play all the time after taking these shots. So where do you draw the line?
    And then you have the federal government; sorry but this whole witch hunt He Said/She Said trials and committees is just freaking rediculous. Almost has the same stinch as the Clinton Impeachment trials. Whole lot of money, and nobody is going to win, only losers, and for what? To get the message out “drugs” are bad. So this is what we have, a group of grown men, taking performance enhancing drugs to play a game for which they are idolized for, with absolutely no checks and balances to ensure fair play, and a witch hunt of top players to secure validity.
    And then I have to ask the question, Who Cares if Barry Bonds was shooting up everyday? He still had come to the plate and hit the ball. He still had to spend hours in the batting cage, he still had to spend hours in work out room. The whole idea that taking these “drugs” will instantly make you a superstar player and give you an advantage is blown completely out of proportion, it just doesn’t happen, and there is absolutely no clinically proof or other that it does. Sure you may experience excellerated gains in weight and even strength, Excellerated being the key word. These results would have been acheived anyway just over longer period of time, given proper nutrition and work out, which all these guys had access to.
    Well that was a bit of rant, Whats your opinion?
     

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    #169567

    Brandon
    Participant

    Chad, I don’t disagree with any of what you say….relative to the professional athletes. The problem with leaving it unchecked is the usage by those ehow will never be professional athletes and who will never have the overall medical attention that professional athletes have at the snap of a finger.
    Young men & women…well, boys & girls across the country, perhaps the world, are dying or incurring serious medical challenges because they attempt to emulate these athletes by using this stuff. AND, they don’t have anyone who knows how to use it. They just pump it in, expect miracles and die.
    The solution is beyond my grasp yet it must somehow be made public that this stuff is bad, won’t make you a super hero and may kill you.
    That isn’t where public opinion is on this stuff right now. Or, at least it is not a broadly enough held opinion.
    All I can suggest at this point is that we each take this message to any young people we have the opportunity to impact….Little League, Pop Warner, Rec Leagues, etc. And it cannot be the “Just Say No” campaign, it must be an informed explanation as to the effects. Our message must have credibility or it will be treated as all our other admonishments to youth as the dictorial adults.

    0
    #169568

    Taylor
    Participant

    Brandon, we are in complete agreement. As with any issue of this magnitude, Education is the key component. At this time all we have is a group saying its bad because its illegal, the medical reasons aside absolutely NO Education is happening beyond the nightly news. I believe communication is happening, but as most things these days it is not taken very seriously within our young people.
    Parents need to be educated to warning signs, and young people need to know all the things that will happen to them if they take this stuff. And then you need testing, and if your caught, a slap on the hand is not good enough, there needs to be some seriousness to the fines.
    I dont have all the answers for sure, or even know enough to comment anymore than I have, but to do nothing is a terrible thing. Trials and and name calling, fines to big atheletes is not enough for sure. Someone has to lead the charge, and if the government does it, for sure the “Just Say No” campaign won’t work

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    #169569

    Brandon
    Participant

    Look what you started Six. I was laughing my head off at the posts in this string…now I’m sitting here with tears in my eyes.
    In retrospect the laughter was just time passing dribble.
    Now, at least, we have posted some thoughts that may touch someone who in turn may touch someone else and make a difference.
    Aahhh…maybe it hasn’t been a lost day after all.
    Believe it or not, I’m off to a Bible study shortly the topic of which is our responsibilities to our children; while mine are grown I do have grandkids. Coincidence or……

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    #169573

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Brandon,
    If anything of value was started in this thread, as I believe it has . . .  well, you know where the glory goes and it isn’t to any of us on the forum.  Both you and Chad have added some good thoughts and value, and I find I am in total agreement with what you both say. 
    I was always amazed by how Charles Barkley once said “I am not a role model.”  He obviously did not understand the status that highly paid and talented sports figures hold in the minds of our youth.  Just by the virtue of the positions they hold and the talents they have, they are role models, like it or not.  Youth will emulate them, want to be like them, and maybe someday, achieve the same lifestyles and notariety they have.  When we see sports stars and “heroes” using drugs, getting into trouble in public, committing crimes, it always has its impacts on our youth who look up to them. 
    The impact from taking steroids is devastating when taken over a long period of time and in an uncontrolled way.  I am always reminded of Lyle Alzedo, who was one of steroids victims.  A great talent and a wonderful person by all accounts, may he rest in peace.  If our youth thinks it’s cool, or it gives them an athletic advantage to use the stuff, they will – the consequences be damned.
    I don’t have the answers, either.  Wish I did.  But I believe it starts with parents who care and are involved, as well as the coaches and society as a whole.  And education is also a key, as you and Chad have said.
    And yes, Brandon – He does work in mysterious ways – and just maybe our levity and wild abandon on this thread has turned into something useful beyond our imaginations.  I wouldn’t be surprised, as He has done some pretty incredible things in my life, when I least expected it and from places I would have never looked for it.  Maybe a bunch of continual process improvement geeks can make a contribution to society far greater than we ever imagined possible.  Faith and hope springs eternally!
    Shooter

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    #169575

    Brandon
    Participant

    Thanks Six. It takes courage to profess our faith, especially in an arena like this. I’m pleased to do so and to see you share your heart.

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    #169583

    Mikel
    Member

    Drugs and steroids are just part of the natural selection process. Just
    a bit slower than your bullet idea.I don’t feel sorry for any of the folks that get caught up in either.

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    #169586

    Stevo
    Member

    Random thought –
     
    Do you think that some of the first athletes said?
     
    “Hey that guy is putting fruits and vegetables into his body, isn’t that illegal?”  He’s getting an unfair advantage!!!
     
    Stevo

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    #169587

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    Random Question –
    Aren’t you comparing apples to oranges? 
    Shooter

    0
    #169588

    Stevo
    Member

    Totally.  It’s what I do.
     
    Facts, ethics, morals and logic have little effect on me.
     
    Stevo

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    #169589

    Taylor
    Participant

    Thats                             Well,, Almost funny

    0
    #169591

    Brandon
    Participant

    Stan, then I am happy for you that you’ve not been touched by drug use by someone you care about. I have.
    I had to learn a great deal about it. Part of what I learned is that it is a disease….at least in this case, not a choice. So I felt very sorry for this person that they had to deal with this burden. And it is as large a burden as anyone may be expected to carry.
    Steroid use is a different matter…that I believe is a choice.

    0
    #169592

    Brandon
    Participant

    Stevo – more scary than funny….unless you’re just trying to be funny.
    Puts me in mind of Lennon’s song “Imagine all the people…..”
    That would be a scary and dangerous world.

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    #169593

    Taylor
    Participant

    Theory of evolution and natural selection lives on
     

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    #169595

    Stevo
    Member

    Facts, ethics, morals and logic have little effect on me.
     
     
    I do have good Powerpoint skills and a nasty call girl habit, so I’m thinking a career choice as a SS consultant or in politics. 
     
    Now if I can just get some “Vote for Stevo” shirts printed up.
     
    Stevo

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    #169596

    Brandon
    Participant

    Stevo – at least you clearly qualify for a mayorial position in a major city.

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    #169597

    DaveS
    Participant

    Stevo,
    There’s an opening for NY governor now.You have skill set  just like the one leaving!

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