iSixSigma

Leadership

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  • #32000

    Eoin Barry
    Participant

    I have a question : what 3 things can a deployment manager do to engrain six sigma into the culture of an organisation i.e. make it “the way things are done around here” – lets assume that the training programme is in place but the project take up has been poor and the snr management have a lot on their plate…..
     

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    #84946

    abasu
    Participant

    If you really want to make six sigma “the way things are done around here” you need to have the following in place.

    Tie 40% of the executive team variable compensation (bonus, options, etc) to six sigma goals such as number of projects, $ saved from six sigma, number of BBs & GBs trained.
    Institute the policy that no one can be promoted to manager and above without BB training.
    All engineers need to be BB certified within two years for continued employment.

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    #171726

    w. g. miller
    Member

    Discussion time:
    What has the experience of the last 5 years shown us about Abasu’s recommendations?
    W. G. Miller

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    #171727

    Brandon
    Participant

    I disagree. Too SS based.
    1. A business needs to be managed to a Balanced Scorecard. Therefore, exec comp needs to be tied to moving all metrics in the card based on their weighted importance to the business. They need a variety of skills to do that; SS being one. Side note: how does the number of BB’s and GB’s trained indicate anything? Not a critical X. No. of projects, $’s saved, yes; number trained – says nothing.
    2. Mngt does not need to be trained to the level of BB’s. Waste of resources. Train to Awareness level so they understand the role SS can play in assisting them in accomplishing their goals.
    3. Engineer SS training, yes. BB level – not necessarily. Depends on the function they perform.
    SS i A skill set that can aide in the mngt of a successful business. It is in no way the “end all, be all”. It takes a whole bunch of other stuff.

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    #171728

    Taylor
    Participant

    I agree Brandon, That whole bunch of other stuff is the key ingredient. Any company can go out and say, were going to train all the engineers to be BB’s, and all the supervision to be GB’s, and all the Upper Sr Management will get the best 3 day vacation in Florida to here some Guru enlighten them about Six Sigma and how they need to implement lean full scale, and at the end of the day all you have is a bunch trained personnel with no idea or direction or experience for that matter. For it to be “the way things are done around here” you have to have a whole bunch of people that already have a clue, understand the goal and know the direction they need to go.
    Abasu, what rock did you crawl out from under. Your system is border line anarchy, and will create separation and resentment within the ranks. I know I have seen similar in action.

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    #171729

    w. g. miller
    Member

    I agree with Brandon and Chad:  with the possible exception of a Six Sigma consulting company, any outfit that uses Abasu’s goals doesn’t know what business it’s in.
    Chad brushed on another point that I would like to make more explicitly:  Abasu’s goals were an attempt to impose Six Sigma by direct order rather than selling its value to employees.  The result of the direct order approach will be a lot of employees who may go through the motions but won’t believe in the program.  That’s a good way to produce a failed Six Sigma implementation.
    W. G. Miller 
     
     

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    #171730

    Vallee
    Participant

    Looking at your post and the other responses there are points on both sides of the coin that makes sense. 1. Number of GB’s and BB’s is not a good metric to base bonuses on unless it is tied to the needs of the business.2. Number of projects completed and money saved or returned is not a good metric unless projects are directed to be done by senior leadership and tie in with the integrated supply chain and future business changes. Silo’d teams and returns usually conflict at the end of the day.3. Internal BB’s should have a place in senior leadership. If kept at their current level and not rewarded for there ROI they will leave the company. It is a reward system and the start of a culture change. Being a senior leader and just having the basic understanding of the process is not enough. Whether you prevent promotion is another question but I will say that if process improvement involvement and commitment tied to business success is not enforced the BB’s have no chance.4. Six Sigma is just part of the process of improvement, culture change, and business success.5. Engineers do need to understand their role in process improvement: whether at the front end or back end of the product business lead decisions with a stable and robust process must be maintained. Whether you train the engineers or assign a permanent BB to the dept is up to the company.6. Safety, HR, and Training leaders need to be included in the process improvement at the front end and back end of production. Their tie to business success is vital but often misunderstood and not tracked. Just ask them how they know they were successful at the end of the day.. it’s usually a lagging metric (of course they get cut first during budget cuts). Problem is that ROI for these type of projects take longer to obtain or is nott existing…i.e preventing some one from getting hurt does not gain the company new money, just keeps them from losing any money. This is why many BB’s avoid these areas as target projects. Just plain wrong!7. Bringing an outside consultant to start identifying the process is just the beginning of improvement. Funny thing though, when you by lots of money to hear what others have already told you it has more weight. Problem 2, what happens to the process improvement program if only the consultants can do the job? What about ownership?Just my thoughts from experience.HF Chris Vallee

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    #171731

    Vallee
    Participant

    See the leaderships posts above.HF Chris Vallee

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    #171732

    Stanley
    Member

    Brandon…What you said is just a plain reality—–I was working as a SS consultant in one of the US fin services companies in India —Management had mandated (infact a clear order) that every Ops Managers should be BB certified and Team Leads be GB certified…managers were wondering what should their project be !!! cost cutting? process improvement? improve employees morale? no clue!!!they were pressurized so much that eventually many ops managers and team leads had to quit the organization due to managements comp/bonus policies, their performance reviews and many more… Finally what did the organization achieve in the name of directionless SS?? lost too many resources – too much of attrition from manager and team leads level, had to change their policies about SS implementation and bonus/comp.
    Lesson is , we must remember what we are gonna achieve from SS before we implement such policies across organization!!! or get prepared for a disaster…..

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