iSixSigma

Lean Questions

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Lean Questions

This topic contains 10 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Vinay Goyal 13 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #41585

    annon
    Participant

    If you had 100 units to produce daily, and Units A, B, C were produced at a 5:3:2 ratio, why would you run production in this sequence (5 of A, then 3 of B, then 2 of C…repeat) verses 500 of A, then 300 of B, then 200 of C?  What are the advantages of this leveling over the high number of setups and lost capacity?
    I have daily demands that are fixed M-F but different for each day.  If I can not smooth the order load, would I have a different takt for each day since I have different daily demand levels?  Averaging them out to get a Daily Demand will not be sufficient to meet OTD dates….But a differing takt per day can’t be right either….help.
    Thank you.

    0
    #130542

    ramblinwreck13
    Participant

    Annon,
    In answers to your questions, I will have to make certain assumptions that might not be factored into your processes.
    For example, TATK times are supposed to include a certain amot of time for change over and SMEDing of processes to allow for mixed models if run on the same line.
    To start with on Question 1, I would not run 5 then 3 then 2, nor 500, then 300 then 200, but rather to Customer mix and order patterns if availible, so that product comming off the lines could be packaged for each customer that day and shipped with minimal rehandling of materials. If product A is for Customer A and they pick up or require shipment at 3pm every day, I would use my TAKT Time to determine when the right time was to make this product everyday, accounting for some minor hicups in the process. If all customers take a mix of product, i wold try and run a mix as well, but one that allowed for a buffer to be maintained at the end of the line where order packing was achomplished.
    2) TAKT is to be calculated at PEAK demand, not average, so if this has been done, running each day is simply a matter of moving people in and ot of work stations to achomplish the build rate. For example, if you have 6 work stations for all of the parts to go thru and your TAKT rates are set to build 100 pieces per day, but PEAK demand for the three items is really 150 per day, and at an assumes 50 for product A, 50 for B and 50 for C, but Monday you had a daily demand for 50 A’s 25 B’s and 25 C’s you’d staff the line to run 50 A’s with 6 workers, 25 B’s with 3 workers each handling 2 stations and 25 C’s again with 3 workers each handling 2 stations.
    3) I hope this helps 
    Ramblinwreck13

    0
    #130546

    Mikel
    Member

    What is SMEDing?

    0
    #130547

    annon
    Participant

    Thanks alot RW13. It does help.

    0
    #130600

    ramblinwreck13
    Participant

    SMED
    Single Minute Exchange of Dies
    Actally in many applications the goal is to SMED inside of 1 TATK time if possible.
     
    If you can change out your dies or tooling in a small set amount of time and yo know how many times per day you will on average be needing to change out dies, then you can subtract this time for the availible minutes to calclate the overall TAKT time of your daily production.
    Hope this helps,
    Ramblinwreck13

    0
    #130640

    Anonymous

    A takt of a single minute? Perhaps you’ve assumed the minute in SMED means small.

    0
    #130646

    Peppe
    Participant

    I don’t understand how you have 5:3:2 ratio constant, having daily  different demand ?  This means you have days with undercapacity and/or overcapacity ? Which is your OEE  and set up % Vs run time ? Try to arrange daily proportions (5:3:2) to minimize set up change (i.e day 1 last production can  be day 2 first production).
    Rgs, Peppe
     

    0
    #130651

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    May be he can assemble Boeing 747 fuselage in a single miniute.

    0
    #130655

    EdG
    Participant

    Questions…

    Why are you producing at a 5:3:2 ratio if the daily demand is fluctuating?  Because of the cycle time for the three different units? —at this ratio it takes the same amount of time to produce these many units— 
    If I only need to produce 100 units daily, then for the week I only need to produce a total of 500 units (assuming M-F work schedule).  Why would you want to produce 500-A, 300-B, and 200-C (it takes two weeks to produce this amount) and potentially run out of any one product since you stated that the daily unit demand fluctuates?  —What if due to an odd demand cycle what happens if you have 350 unit demand of B in one week yet you have only produced 300 over the course of a two week period—

    0
    #130664

    Dr. Russ (Reza) Pirasteh, MBA, itlsE, PMP, CMBB, CLM
    Participant

    SMED is a change over/set up that takes less than 2-digit or 10 minutes to accomplish. A desirable set up should be less than 10 minutes.
    Hope this helps.

    0
    #130681

    Vinay Goyal
    Member

    Some of our products are sold in the form of a kit. During testing one chemical is used more than others because carrier on the machine can accomodate only one size cartridges. In that case, when we sell our kit, it can have a ratio like 5-3-2. Also, they have shelf lives so we can not over produce and they should be readily available, we can not afford to under produce. There is no one perfect solution however based on the past history a formula can be created to predict a Kanban system to balance demand and supply.  

    0
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.