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Topic Want to Make Waste Detection Training Interactive

Want to Make Waste Detection Training Interactive

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Romell 7 months ago.

Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #546815 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    Greetings to all of you,

    In my current company, we are having a problem in our Kaizen program, the entries being passed are too low in number, to ease it we’ve decided to have a refreshment training for the supervisors about waste detection and i want it to be so interactive.

    The problem now is, I don’t have enough resources and knowledge for this (i’m only a student, current on my on-the-job training). So, anyone please help me with this.

    Thank you and best regards

    #547517 Reply

    @meromell20i5 – I really feel sorry for you. Since you seem to be a co-op, and not invested in this company, one thing you should learn from this experience is that asking a co-op to do this should indicate the level of interest/involvement that the leadership has in this process. It should also be an indicator of whether they believe this process will have any positive impact. After your internship is over, run-away, fast and far.

    #549177 Reply

    How do they know that the entries are too low in number? If that’s true, then the waste was detected some other way. If so, what’s the point? Or maybe they’re looking at some sort of benchmark — We’re detecting less waste than the benchmark. That could be a good thing. They apparently aren’t asking you to find on-line or a on-site training. If they had that in mind they wouldn’t have asked you to do it.

    You’re being asked to do something you aren’t qualified to do. Many of us have been in that situation. You can choose between three alternatives. 1. Run away. 2. Stick it out, expecting to fail. 3. Accept the challenge. Since you posted this question you’re probably leaning toward the latter and since you’re doing on the job training I encourage you to pursue that. At worst you’ll fail but you’ll learn much more than if you chose the other alternatives.

    You won’t find much help on this forum unless you ask specific questions. You will find helpful information by searching this site and elsewhere. If you have connections or you’re ambitious enough you might find a mentor. Good luck.

    #549857 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @MBBinWI Hi! Actually the project was included in my thesis, so basically i really should do this project.

    #549862 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @Straydog Hi sir! The low number of waste detected in company doesn’t reflect in the current situation of the company, Actually this is a company that is just starting to implement lean. So I concluded that maybe, they need training like this to help them develop their “it’s fine” thinking.

    #550178 Reply

    Have a look yourself and hit the softest target you can find by taking a Gemba walk round the area and removing or recommending removal of any waste you see. There will be lots of it and if you help someone become more efficient by removing some you will gain credibility. You just need them to talk it up once its been done hence going for the easy win first!

    Just my opinion.

    #550849 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @Andy-Parr Hi! Thank you very much for your opinion

    #550956 Reply

    Forgive us for disparaging comments when we assumed we knew your situation. Now that you’ve clarified, it seems you have a real opportunity to make a difference. Since this company is new to lean I’d recommend that you start with 5S. It’s a proven way to change the culture. You don’t need formal staff training at first, interactive or not. But you do need strong management support.

    I’ve found it best to start with one process/work group. Have them sort the stuff they have on hand, categorizing by stuff they always need to do the job, stuff they sometimes use, stuff they rarely use, stuff they don’t use but need to keep, and stuff they don’t need. The rest of 5S follows. Once they get past Sort you can get another group started. And then you can start talking about defect detection.

    This may not be the answer you were looking for but I can assure you that putting the cart before the horse makes the journey harder.

    #551268 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @Straydog Hi sir! Sorry for not clearing my situation. Btw thank you for the comments, the company has already started implementing 7S, and I think I should start with sorting things in a certain process as you said, I just hope that it wont take too much time.

    I already asked certain people in some operations and they told me that operators (all of them came from manpower agency) only care for their output because they are piece rated. More so, they are don’t have enough support from regular employees to further discuss their Kaizen.

    Current Kaizen Framework (small bits)
    1. No more than four in a group.
    2. You are required to have at lease one regular employee in a group.
    3. Defense first before incentives. (no initial reward for kaizen passed)

    #551334 Reply

    @meromell20i5 – since you have a large portion of the workforce that is contracted, you will face particular headwinds. These people will likely be resistant to anything that reduces the amount of time/work required. This is logical from their point as the less time/work the less they are needed. This is self-preservation.

    If you can formulate the expected results as making the work easier instead of just reducing time (which ultimately means cutting heads) you will have a better chance at positive reception.

    Good luck.

    #551352 Reply

    @meromell20i5 – I might be off track but it sounds like you are looking for ways to increase engagement. I agree some basic (high level) training on the idea of Continuous Improvement may be good but I wouldn’t start there. I would suggest you put some teams together for a hour long workshop where you ask two questions 1) What are we doing really well? and 2) What could we be doing better? Have post its at every seat in the room and ask for 5-6 answers from each for the first question. Collect them in a common area – discuss – How do we know we are doing well – what are the indicators? What it is about those things that the group is proud of? Let the team boast for a bit. Then ask them to help find some common themes – Ask What do they have in common? The feel good of the first question should help provide a level of trust needed to explore the second question. What could we be doing better? Same rules everyone needs to place 5-6 things on the board. Nothing is off limits. If people seem stuck – reword the question ask What gives you a headache? Put a timeline on it – You have 8 mins… for example. Once the answers are on the board ask probing questions – What do you think about what we have up here? Are any of them the same? Do we see any common threads? Does anything stand out as an area we would be willing to invest our time and talent to addressing?

    You also may want to incorporate a short game that we were taught in training – The Ball Game – put your group in a circle and give one of the members a small ball. Tell them the rules are that they are to pass the ball to anyone other than the person to their right or to their left. Pass continues from one to another so that everyone gets a the ball and each touches it only once. Let them practice until they successfully meet all the conditions. Then tell them to repeat that pattern and time them. That represents the process now. The next step is to improve the process. Here’s where it gets fun. They must continue to pass the ball in the same order as before but they have to do it faster and faster and the only way to accomplish that is to be creative. Don’t tell the team how to adjust just ask them to do it in shorter and shorter increments of time.

    Hope that helps.

    Tina

    #551389 Reply

    7S?

    I’m old fashioned and struggle when organizations say we need 6S because we also want safety……what is 7S?

    FYI, I highly value 5S AND Safety but I don’t think the 2 concepts should be confused even though 5S highly impacts safety.

    #551408 Reply

    @cseider – I’m with you on the basic old 5S. Apparently, some whiz kid has added another S
    Spirit: As leaders understand the impact of company culture and the importance of respect for employees, the need for this additional component becomes clear. While some organizations successfully implement the traditional 5S method, many are choosing to add Spirit as an additional piece to make explicit the reliance on the people factor and the need to continually keep it in mind as other steps are undertaken.

    #551510 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @cw2207te Hi! Big help! Thank you very much, those activities and techniques are what i really needed. I’m just wondering, about the ball game, so they should not move from their initial location? they can just bend or something? or its fine that they move around?

    #551513 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @cseider Hi sir! As a manual food manufacturing industry, we have added safety and security to the traditional 5S.

    #551514 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @MBBinWI Hi sir! I think approaches are different but the real essence is still the same.

    #551646 Reply

    @meromell20i5 They absolutely can move around. The only non-negotiable is that the order in which they pass the ball (the order they came up with to set current process) has to stay the same. Don’t make any suggestions about how to improve – let the group come up with it. Its fun to see how they transition their thinking. Likely they will stay in the same order and try to keep getting faster but at some point the timing will demand more creative solutions. At that point you may see them move the circle in tighter. They may rearrange themselves. As the time shortens they will be challenged to thing outside of what they have already accustomed their brains to accept. Once they break through and realize if they are shoulder to shoulder and in the order that the ball needs to pass and better yet, perhaps the ball stays in the center and everyone touches it but it does not move – they will feel like rock stars. GOOD LUCK!

    #551699 Reply

    @MBBinWI

    Let’s get some spirit. :)

    In the spirit of innovation, it’s interesting what ideas are out there.

    #551732 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @cw2207te Hi! Thank you very much, I’ll keep in touch what ever happens with my presentation. :D

    #551761 Reply

    As far as 6S or 7S, I’ve been seeing a trend to add “S”s such as security and safety, because these are also important. The problem is that this can obfuscate the purpose and effectiveness. The 5S are steps on the journey. The additions are not. Sure, they should be considered along the way, and they should be included in Standardize, but they are different.

    My experience with contract (or union) workers is there’ll be push back. If compensation is not strictly an hourly wage you may even have to modify contracts to change work descriptions or to provide compensation “in kind” for participation. Good luck with that one.

    Here’s another ball game you might try. You’ll need 5 balls about the size of a golf ball and a bucket or wastebasket. Tell the group that one person holds all the balls to start. Each person must touch each ball before it’s dropped into the bucket. Let them figure out how to do that and time them. Then ask them to think of a faster way. Then ask them to think of an even faster way. (If they each put one hand under the hand holding the balls to form a ramp, the balls can roll across their hands into the bucket. If they don’t figure this out you can show them at the end of the game.)

    #551795 Reply

    Romell
    Participant
    Reputation - 59
    Rank - Aluminum

    @Straydog Hi sir! Thank you very much for your opinion. I really appreciate all your help.

    I hope that this topic will help other people

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