iSixSigma

Managing Black Belt Candidates

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Managing Black Belt Candidates

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #34708

    Tab
    Member

    I am looking for information on the selection critieria used by companies to select black belt candidates. 

    are candidates limited to “high potentials”
    is the grade level limited (e.g., lower level grades)
    is there a tenure requirement (e.g., 1 year or more with company before being nominated)
    Many companies use black belt assignments to develop their “high potential” employees.  I am interested in how your black belts are being evaluated while in this assignment.

    minimum process improvement project savings,
    number of projects completed,
    time to become a certified black belt,
    project team reviews, etc.
    Also, what is the term of the black belt assignment (e.g., 1 year, 2 years) and when does it start (when assigned, when certified, etc.)?
    Thanks for your help.

    0
    #96011

    Dillon
    Participant

    Tab,
    I will outline how the company I work for approaches the Lean Sigma Program:
    Selection Criteria:
        1) It is an interview position within the company along with a few personality profile tests, etc.
        2) No tenure requirement.
        3) Not limited to Grage Level – the position itself carries a certain grade level once certification is obtained.
        4)  It is looked at as a way to develop the “high pots” in the company.
    Black Belt Candidates are judged on the following:
      1)  Bottom Line Savings
      2)  Use of the methodology (there is a “grading” template used during the training sessions on which candidates must score a minimum in order to become certified).
      3)  Certification is expected within the first 6-9 months of the program (including training time).
      4)  Project reviews are held during training and then at 6 week intervals to judge progress.
      5)  When going through certification, the HR department goes through a 360 review with the BBC’s team.
     
    Once an individual has accepted the role of a BB/BBC, they are committed to the program for a 2 year period.
     
    Hope this helps.
     
    Doug
    MBB

    0
    #96018

    Tab
    Member

    Doug:
    Thank you – this was very helpful.  I’ve seen companies handle this aspect of the Six Sigma program differently and this will help us discern what “best practices” we need to consider going forward.

    0
    #96049

    John J. McDonough
    Participant

    Very similar where I used to work … probably a few slight differences due to culture, etc.
    Selecting BB’s

    Generally looked at as leaders/potential leaders
    Usually people on technical/professional track
    Usually 5-10 years with the company
    The process is colored somewhat by the promotion policy.  Above a certain level, people are expected to have certified at least as a Green Belt before they are promotable.  In some leadership roles, MBB certification is expected, although the “requirement” is GB.
    Black Belts get a lot of exposure to upper management. This is both a perk of being a BB and an opportunity to see their performance.  Part of the BB training is practicing their “elevator speech” – what do they say when they get on the elevator with the president and he asks about their project.
    In addition to what Doug mentioned, there are softer skills to be evaluated, as well.  How well can the BB facilitate the team, how well can he interact with upper managers, stakeholders, etc.
    BB’s sign on for a minimum two year tour, but some stay on longer.
    –McD
     

    0
    #96058

    Tab
    Member

    John:
    Thanks for providing this information.  Anecdotally, it seems most companies recruit those with leadership/management potential and have a two year tenure for their black belts.

    0
    #96059

    Hetchner
    Member

    From my experiece selection is based on being at the right place at the right time.  It really depends on your boss and the companies willingness to achieve their corporate goals
    Example:
    I was hired in March 2003 , trained May 2003-August 2003, certified Novemberr 2003. 
     

    0
    #96061

    Tab
    Member

    William:
    Thanks for your information…I was curious as to whether you started under a college hire program and/or if you were hired with the understanding that you would be entering the six sigma black belt program.

    0
    #96063

    Dieter
    Participant

    John,
    couldn’t help to smile when reading the part of the “elevator speech”. So what is best: “everythin is fine” – “there are some roadblocks” – “great challange” …?
    Dieter

    0
    #96079

    Hetchner
    Member

    I was hired as a Motor Development Engineering.  I had no intentions of getting into 6sig but now I use the tools all the time to solve issues.

    0
    #96101

    John J. McDonough
    Participant

    Dieter – this is a very large company whose leaders have all at least been to the Six Sigma boot camp, and most are certified GB’s.  They all probably spend an hour or two a week reviewing Six Sigma project storyboards.  The elevator speech needs to be specific and detailed, and still keep to a few minutes.
    So it might be a ten or fifteen word recap of the objective, a statement about the defect and the current and target sigma levels, and a word about where we expect to derive our savings and how much.  Then maybe a couple of words about where we are and what is the next milestone.
    With DFSS projects, which tend to be a little larger, chances are they are already aware of the project and its objectives adn don’t need to be reminded, so a little more focus on the current status is in order.  In the case of larger projects in particular, it’s good to mention any concerns.  If it turns out to be a problem they will feel like they weren’t blindsided, and often that sort of casual conversation can make resources fall from the sky.
    With practice, you can get a lot of information into a minute or two.
    In any case, the Black Belt needs to be well-prepared at all times.  These guys tend to ask hard questions, and you want to be ready with the answer, especially for larger projects.
    –McD
     

    0
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.