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Measure Email Response

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Operations Call Centers Measure Email Response

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  • #53963

    Dear all,

    I am a stupid person in IT area. My recent project is involving measuring the operator response on replying customers\’ inquiry. What I can think of is randomly select some operators and ask them to give me their reply to measure the total response time. Because of customer requirement, we need to submit our daily performance about how much% that we can meet the customer specification (say within 2 hours). So we cannot promptly response to the customer on this issue.

    Our inhouse IT department can only draw out the report on email sender, receipient, and subject only. But cannot match out each email responding to. Any genius can help?

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    #192308

    Nick
    Participant

    I don’t have a good solution for you but it may be enough to spur your thoughts. Perhaps some others in this forum will be able to provide better ideas as well.

    I recently faced a similiar problem for phone calls (not emails). When the call center was unable to answer the call live they are required to respond to the voice message within a set period of time. Fortunately the call center had a very narrow focus so their weekly volume was small which allowed us to manually log the each voice message event in a spreadsheet (timestamp when the message was left and the timestamp when we returned the call) and compute the difference for every voice message left. Obviously this call center did not have the latest and greatest phone system and software either. The right technology would make a world of difference here.

    If your IT department could put the customer’s email address and timestamp of the email into separate fields on a spreadsheet all email sent/received then you could probably use the some spreadsheet formulas (i.e. the VLOOKUP command) to match an incoming email (i.e. customer request) to an outgoing email (i.e. your response to the customer) and then compute the time difference from the respective timestamps.

    Very manual and clunky way to do business but it may be better than nothing. This also assumes that each customer request will have a unique email address and only have a single request open at one time. I’m sure these assumptions wouldn’t be difficult to violate but if they hold true for 90-95% of your population it might be good enough.

    Nick

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    #192333

    Thanks Nick. That’s about what the IT people helping to do. However, as said it cannot match 100% or even 90% confidence.

    Regarding with your call center case, it is very manual. I am glad that our current call centre phone system is advance enough to record the response time of even the return of the voice message…..

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    #195863

    Sheldon
    Member

    Usually there are two metrics call centers look at 2 email metrics, the first one is how long did it sit in the inbox before we opened it. The second is how long did it take for us to close the email, or reply to the customer. There is software packages out there that will give you every type of report you could want about email response time. Google Call Center email tracking software, you will get a plethora of companies that offer this product.

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    #195885

    Kimmy Burgess
    Participant

    The important metric to measure email response is the click-through rate. It is about the number of people who open your email compared to the number of them that actually click the link to go to your website. The best way to make this happen is that your email message is targeted and relevant to your intended audience.

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    #195901

    Darth
    Participant

    @cashinasnap Kimmy your response makes no sense…who could have seen that coming? The thread talks about the response of a call center to email coming in. In the past, all input to a call center was via phone call. The typical metrics were how long it took to answer, average handle time (AHT) and abandon rate. With many inquiries now coming in via email, @sheldon18 describes equivalent measures in how long it takes to open an email and how long it takes to respond and close the email. It has nothing to do with what you posted.

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    #195904

    Sheldon
    Member

    @Darth Kimmy’s response is not as bad as you may think, it is distantly related to response time, while her response is not the best way to measure email response time, it can be a good measurement of how effective your marketing is. Which in turn you can use the click through rate from each marketing campaign to judge the number of staff you need to flex. If you are not staffed correctly to handle a specific marketing campaign it can affect your response time. It is a tool but its not necessarily the best tool to use.

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    #195907

    Darth
    Participant

    @sheldon18 Nice stretch Shelly…. I can agree it was a great answer for a different question. :-).

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