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Methods for Measuring and Analyzing Waste

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums Methodology Methods for Measuring and Analyzing Waste

This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Mike Carnell 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #56098

    Peter

    Hey guys

    Within my Six Sigma project the following question should be answered:
    What is the performance of the process in terms of waste types?

    For the measure phase, I’m trying to create the Data Collection Plan.
    Now I need some approach or literature that lists the different methods to identify and analyze the wastes.

    For example, to measure the waste type “wait”, I will use work sampling or multi moment method.

    Can someone give me a literature with at best a list, which assigns different methods to the wastes?

    greeting
    Peter

    #203057

    Strayer
    Participant

    If you’re having to measure all of the potential wastes you haven’t identified a specific problem and you’re trying to boil the ocean. I’d recommend that you take a step back and do a value stream map, or time value map, of the process to identify where and what type of waste is occurring. Choose the most egregious waste point, write a specific problem statement, do your improvement project, remap the process and repeat. That’s continuous improvement.

    #203058

    Chris

    I’d add in, simple time observations should identify waste in process steps, ie value add, non value add. Utilize that data at process level.

    #203059

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Peter I am all in with @Straydog. The only thing I would be concerned with at this point is standing at a point where I could see the process and document what I saw. I also would not pull any kind of report in advance to prejudice your observations. Those are 2 different things. What you see and what is reported.

    It sounds like you are already looking for solutions and at this point you do not even have a problem definition. Charles Kettering, the famed inventor and head of research for GM, said “a problem well-stated is half-solved.”

    Just my opinion

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