iSixSigma

Military

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #38256

    Inspector9
    Participant

    Any advice out there on implementing change and general process improvement within the confines of a military unit?
    I am a civilian at one of the huge military complexes in DC.  Huge changes are needed, are possible and in fact encouraged.  The problem lies with existing policys and procedures and policies and procedures and …………………

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    #114325

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    I was able to implement some of the methodology when still on active duty and then later in the reserves.   The problem with trying to adapt the concepts, tools and methods lies in the hierarchical nature of the armed forces.    team consensus d-m processes are subject to chain of command concerns.
    I was able to use capability six packs to show my Commander’s their baseline process health and post-improvement results.

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    #114327

    Darth
    Participant

    We are starting an extensive SS rollout in the military.  Feel free to contact me offline for a further discussion:  [email protected]

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    #114328

    DColvin
    Participant

    The CIA is currently using Six Sigma and has some training/reference  materials dealing with policies and procedures.  I will post here if I can find the name of the materials.
    P.S. Heebeegeebee…are you in Tucson??

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    #114330

    EdG
    Participant

    I am aware of a variety of process improvement activities within the military that are ongoing (some have been ongoing for a while).
    NAVAIR’s Depots are undertaking mostly lean and six sigma as means to implement improvements.  From an enterprise perspective NAVAIR is begining to use theory of contraints as a means of managing the flow of work in/out of their D and I level activities.  Some of NAVAIR’s Intermediate level maintenance (Navy side) activites are begining to use lean however the Marines are using theory of constraints (have been for ~3 years now).
    NAVSEA is trying their hand in continuous improvement also.  The Shipyards are trying a mixture or lean and six sigma while the intermediate level activites are focusing on lean.
    A number of the US Air Force’s Air Logistic Centers are trying to do improvement via lean (some have been working at it since 1999 and earlier).  I also believe that a few of the Army’s maintenance centers are trying out lean (at least that is what I have heard at a few conferences).
    Good luck, EdG

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    #114331

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    Hey D,
    I’m on business in Los Angeles.   Traveling back to the old pueblo tomorrow.
    You still at the old shop?

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    #114352

    Doug S
    Participant

    DColvin –
    Are you still over at Bombardier? We went to BB training together inWichita, KS.
    Just wondering.
    Doug

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    #114356

    Thomas C. Trible
    Member

    Inspector 9:
    There have been numerous improvement initiatives within the military, and quasi-military organizations, including Lean Thinking, Six Sigma, and TQM. All service groups have been involved in these initiatives at some time.
    Most notable is the Navy’s TQM intiiative. The Navy, incidently, coined the term. 
    Gerry Verduft discusses the application of lean thinking to the U.S. aerospace industry, and in particular, to the acquisition of space products such as satellites. VerDuft addresses NASA’s implementation of lean, and major corporations producing space products that have implemented lean.  See VerDuft, G. L. (1997). Lean thinking in space products acquisition. ProQuest Digital Dissertations, (UMI No. 1387523).
    The U.S. Army has undertaken a lean initiative, described by Paul J. Kern in 2002, then Commanding General, U.S. Army Material Command (AMC). According to Kern, “We are looking for ways to make … [supporting our soldiers] more effective and more efficient. Each line item of equipment produced and delivered, each requisition processes, every automation system is a candidate for lean thinking to make it better.”  See Kern, P. J. (2002, October). Army Material Command: Using ‘lean thinking’ to transform the army. Army Magazine, 67-74; http://www.amc.army.mil/LEAN
    Ardel Nelson and G. Ronal Gilbert (both civilians) describe their experience with implementing continual improvement in the Air Force in Beyond Particpative Management, Project Pacer Share.  The book review in amazon.com discuss the book as, “How to manage organizations and people for quality by examining an actual government-sponsored case, Project Pacer Share. The project, implemented at McClellan Air Force Base, is based on customer-focused and process-centered behavior, and is described by the chief designer and developer, and the primary outside consultant to the project. Among the topics discussed by the authors and other program participants are transforming American organizations to a quality approach; the various processes, tools, and techniques used in Pacer Share; and new methodologies and reeducation procedures needed to create better organizations.”
    Good Luck,
    TC Trible
     
     

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    #114361

    DColvin
    Participant

    I’m in PHX now.  I’m an MBB at American Express.  Drop me a line at [email protected]

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    #114698

    Paul S
    Participant

    It might help to know that the military has attempted to impose in the past improvement initiatives. TQM, for those who might remember was a very large military undertaking, under the repackaged label of TQL (L= leadership to get the Marines to bring it in, they did not like management).
    This was touted from the top. It was packaged in literature and distributed. Training was held. Directives were given. Those of us on the receiving end started to believe. We gathered, used the tools, conducted group sessions, made recommendations to the senior management, and then…..discovered that the CO’s did not like any form of sharing of power. TQL died a slow but deliberate death, mocking those of us who pressed the “I believe buton” and tried to do the right thing.
    I would sugget using chapter 5 of the book Lean Six Sigma, by Michael George as a guide for getting Management Committment. The US Navy had one cheerleader, a senior Admirial. But with rotations that occure frequently, he moved on and any top committment for TQL died with his transfer.
    Good Luck.

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    #114722

    Rick Duncan
    Member

    I have been working with lean transformations at the AF depots over the last year. We have great buy-in from the floor personnel and top management. The problem lies in the middle. The system is so compartmentalized that communications and directives bog down. Maintenance doesn’t talk to production, or purchasing, or scheduling, or finance, or supply, and so on. And so we build on the issues of policies and proceedures being different for the separate groups. The one clear vision for customer satisfaction would help realign the policies.
    Example: We have taken a commodity from 115 flow days to 64 flow days in roughly eight months. The next target is 45 days with 15 days being the ultimate. We hit the wall because of supply chain management issues. Now the lean methods have to be applied to above-the-shop-floor areas in order for the shop floor to progress.
    The tools work in the military. The one vision concept must prevail. The policies can be rewritten because I have written waivers to prove the points of the lean concept. Good Luck!

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    #114741

    Hans Raj Mishra
    Participant

    That’s a real life problem – Lean methodologies can’t be implemented with full potential in isolation. But nevertheless, we should remember that  Mlitary was the initiater of Quality concept. As far as foloowing somehing meticulasly, Military has the highest score over other. issue is they become rigid and don’t accept variation as a natural law. Here more flexibility and transparecy can help. I recall one incident in a Ordnance factory in India whre an ex Army general never allowed any variation beyond the Mean values! result was wrong reporting by subordinates. Military has it’s own queer way of working! That needs to be re-looked.

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    #116884

    eastcoastguy
    Participant

    heebeegeebee bb,
    I am currently active duty AF working enrolled in a Quality Management class.  I came into the AF right about the time TQM was dying.  One of my previous bosses pushed Lean but it never got any traction.
    I am now reading Six Sigma for the first time as part of my class, and I find myself continually mulling over how this might be implemented in a program office environment. 
    I am curious about “capability six packs.”  I have never heard the term.  Can you give me a vector for more information?
    Thanks, Cory

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    #117312

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    Sorry for the late reply.
    Capability Six pack:
    From Minitab:
    “…In other areas this program continues to improve with the quantity and quality of output with minimal effort. An outstanding analysis is the capability sixpacks, offered under the Quality Tools umbrella. With a single choice, the analyst receives a capability histogram, error plot, Xbar and R chart, normal probability chart, capability plot, and last 20 subgroups chart (Figure 2). For the more specialized needs, tests such as autocorrelation, moving average, and trend analysis (under Time Series) and probit analysis and accelerated life testing…”
    You can specifu XBAR/R or I/MR as well.

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    #128198

    Francisco A. Pasallo
    Participant

    Dear Inspector
    We have gone through a remarkable transformation, and have acheived greater efficiency implementing the lean process to our organization. Try surfing the NAVAIR web site:
    http://www.navair.navy.mil/NAVAIRAIRSpeed/index.cfm
    Lot of detail and the people who have championed the cause.
    Frank Pasallo, E2/C2 Program, code 92301

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