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Motorola still using Six Sigma

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  • #68866

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Are you sure you didn’t just hear about DFSS?
    Using Six Sigma, a company can usually move from their current sigma level to around 4.8 sigma.  ie. by applying Six Sigma methodology to remove defects etc. from current processes.
    However, to move beyond 4.8 usually requires a complete re-design of the process.  The redesigning of the process is called DFSS – Design for Six Sigma.
     

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    #68869

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Could be …. the person making the statement did not remember the terminology for what Motorola was moving to, but noted he had seen an article.  If anyone knows about a recent Motorola Six Sigma article, I would be interested in reading it
    Thanks for your feedback.

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    #68883

    Cone
    Participant

    Motorola is still using Six Sigma.
    With regards to the other post, Motorola was using DFSS at least 11 years ago and moved way past 5 sigma before that. The quoting of 4.8 sigma as the wall without DFSS is misinformed.

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    #27876

    Anonymous
    Participant

    In a recent Six Sigma training session, it was mentioned that Motorola is no longer using the Six Sigma methodology, but has moved to a new program aimed at moving from 3.4 DPM to yet a higher level of Sigma.  I did a bit of web-surfing looking for information to confirm this comment, but did not find anything.  Can anyone tell me if this is true and if so, what is the new quality program at Motorola is called?
    Thanks!

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    #68887

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Gary, thanks for the feedback that “Motorola is still using Six Sigma”.  Are you familiar with a recent article that may have indicated they are using something to supplement Six Sigma or that they are using a refined Six Sigma approach to move beyond current quality levels?
    This information will be helpful to answer the “nay sayers” that are often looking for reasons not to implement a new continuous improvement approach. 
    Thanks in advance for any addtional information you can provide.

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    #68911

    anon
    Participant

    Motorola is certainly still using SS.
    The problem is they build very high quality stuff that nobody wants.  They need a program to help identify something people will buy – then they would have something.

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    #68915

    Kim Niles
    Participant

    I did a quick search of Motorola’s website and found very little on their Quality Management system.  In fact, they have a great history site at http://www.motorola.com/content/0,1037,115-280,00.html with information going back to the 20’s but they don’t even mention receiving the Malcolm Baldridge award or Six Sigma. 
    However, they did have a site that infers that they are Six Sigma at http://www.motorola.com/MIMS/ISG/ING/quality/, so since they are near Six Sigma in reality and therefore would not want to create a web page defect, ergo, they must still be practicing Six Sigma .
    KN http://www.znet.com/~sdsampe/kimn.htm

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    #68918

    Anonymous
    Participant

    To be truely 6 sigma your measures must reflect your customer CTQs so Motorola cannot be six sigma if they are making stuff the customer doesn’t want, looks like they are missing the who point!!

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    #68926

    drew
    Participant

    I’m not sure I buy that “they make high quality stuff that nobody wants”.  Use of CTQs will certainly avoid that.  However, there is a methodology that focuses on providing value to a customer (value is the relationship of function to cost) called Value Engineering.  It is a great complement to six sigma.  To learn more, visit http://www.value-eng.org or contact me.

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    #68927

    Ijaz Rauf
    Participant

    I think the term you are looking for the supplement six-sigma is lean manufacturing. Perhaps that’s what Motorola is using in addition to six-sigma. Six-sigma helps you control your processes to reduce defect and reduce the cost of poor quality. While lean manufacturing, goes a step further in trying to help you reduce the actual cost of production, i.e. helping u produce the best quality at the lowest possible price to the company.

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    #68929

    john beaudoin
    Participant

    Motorola may not have the sales of its products like other great companies such as SONY, but to say that no one wants their stuff is going to the extreme.  There is a Motorola headset on every NFL coach that you see on Sundays, I have a Motorola Cell Phone with Sprint PCS and it works great, all of the biggest distribution centers such as those for Wal-Mart and K-Mart use Motorola radios to communicate between Security, Yard Drivers, and Departments (you need to when your buildings are over 1,000,000 square feet under one roof), and who wouldn’t want a few of those Motorola personal walkie talkies to go 4-Wheelin’ or Snow Mobilin’ with a buddy?  Oh, and by the way, Motorola happens to make a faster microprocessor than Pentium which is used in all of the new Apple G4’s.  Say what you will PC people, but only the Apples can handle the data that all of the movie professionals need for special effects and video editing, and the vast majority of all commercial artists use Apple for all advertising.

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    #68936

    Nancy Eickelmann
    Participant

    Hi Kim,
    FYI, if you click on the 1980 decade of the Motorola Timeline the Malcolm Baldrige award is listed under 1988, the year it was awarded.
     
    1988

    George M.C. Fisher is elected president and chief executive officer. Robert W. Galvin remains as chairman of the Board. Gary L. Tooker is elected chief operating officer. William J. Weisz continues as vice chairman of the Board and John F. Mitchell is elected vice chairman of the Board.
    Motorola is a winner of the first Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, given by the U.S. Congress to recognize and inspire the pursuit of quality in American business.

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    #68937

    Don Horst
    Participant

    Six Sigma is definitely alive and well across all Motorola. There are regular meetings with the Six Sigma champions across the corporation constantly tweaking and updating the Six Sigma programs. Please let me know if you need any further information.

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    #68958

    Kim Niles
    Participant

    Oops I missed it, Thanks. KN

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    #68981

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Are you referring to “five 9’s?” I had a VERY brief conversation with a neighbor who works for Motorola a few months ago. Six Sigma is very much alive in that organization, and through this new twist toward defect reduction called “five 9’s” they are attempting to take it to new heights. Can anyone from Motorola enlighten us further on this?

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    #68991

    Ken Myers
    Participant

    Drew,
    It’s interesting how various methods go in and out of style.  I did Value Engineering when I worked for Hughes Aircraft Company back in the ’70s.  Nothing real new here…
     

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    #68994

    Just browsing
    Participant

    Five nines is another quality concept to measure AVAILABILITY…if one can design systems that are available 99.999% of the time (those are the five nines) , then it is a 5 nines availability system….
     
     

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    #68996

    Paperbag Comedian
    Participant

    Definately better than three 6’s!

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    #69034

    Anonymous V
    Participant

    It’s called Maverick Product Elimination

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    #69045

    Ken K.
    Participant

    I can assure you that Motorola continues to have a strong Six Sigma environment AND a mature and active Six Sigma Black Belt organization/ community that has never wavered since its inception.
    Keep in mind that Motorola has been involved in Six Sigma for almost 15 years!! To a great extent the Six Sigma activities been absorbed into the daily routine of the businesses and expanded into a process that Motorola calls Performace Excellence. Think of this as Six Sigma on steriods, spreading the methods and expectations to all areas of the business and invoving a wide array of metrics for business decision makeing. That is partially why web sites and other information doesn’t identify Six Sigma specifically.
    Sigma levels for product are still tracked and reviewed routinely on an ongoing basis, and used as one of many bases for improvement strategies.
    A Corporate Six Sigma Black Belt Steering Committee oversees and manages the Black Belt program in coordination with Corporate Quality organizations. This committee charters Sector Six Sigma Black Belt Steering Committees who are tasked with supporting and driving the program within the businesses. An annual Six Sigma Black Belt Symposium draws Black Belts from around the world and encourages active communication and growth.
    The Six Sigma Black Belt program format and requirements remain essentially as they were from the very beginning. Unlike GE & others, Motorola Black Belts, remain in their positions and use their Six Sigma methods to improve products and processes locally, and also to promote the use of these methods throughout the Corproration.
    Motorola continues to recognize three levels: Green, Black, and Master Black. Candidates have a mentor and a management sponsor, who work together to ensure that appropriate skills and experience are received. Motorola’s objective is to have fewer (compared to most other companys), very well trained and experienced (compared to most other SS companies) Black Belts in key areas of the business to drive improvement.
    Green & Black Belt recognition is based upon completion of a mildly complex matrix of skill requirements (including statistics, quality tools, problem solving), advanced technical skills electives, interpersonal skill electives, and skill demonstration requirements (this requirement is much more substantial than most BB programs – it typically takes 1 to 2 years to complete). Green Belts require much fewer skills and demonstrations than Black Belts. Green Belt typically requires about 16 days of training, Black Belt typically requires about 30 days of traning. Much more training than in most programs.
    Master Black Belt recognition requires nomination from a sector Steering Committee, recommendation and recognition from Motorola upper management (Vice-President), mentoring of six Black Belts, and five years of active application of Six Sigma methods since becoming a Black Belt. These Master Black Belts provide leadership, continuity, and a wealth of experince.

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    #69124

    R.Martin
    Participant

    As a former Motorola employee, I would say that no Six Sigma mentality exist in the whole Corporation. Each individual business unit just define Six sigma or claim to, adjusting numbers. Six Sigma should be a Corporate way of doing business, everywhere in the Company. services, products, etc. As many times I said to my colleagues, the inventor of the Six Sigma concepts, lost the taste for it.

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