iSixSigma

New implementation in a very political environment

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General New implementation in a very political environment

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #30107

    Travis Bailey
    Member

    Good afternoon, everyone.
    There are three of us who have been assigned the daunting task of bringing Six Sigma and all of its magic to our Casino Resort property.
    However, this is a very political environment with many people that have been here since the onset of gaming in Northern Michigan.  Therefore, there is going to be plenty of staunch resistance to change, especially a corporate wide change in culture. 
    Does anyone have any insight into ways to work around these large hurdles or any pitfalls in dealing with resistent management in such a political environment? 
    If you would like to send a direct email in order to completely fill me in on your own experience with implementation and the challenges you had to face….please feel free to write to me at:   [email protected]
    I appreciate any input from those of you who have the knowledge and the battle scars to prove it. 
    LOL….have a great day!
     
    Travis Bailey
    PS…also our business is unique in regard to Six Sigma.  If anyone has insight into Six Sigma efforts in a casino environment…again, I welcome your insight and support.  Thank you.

    0
    #78068

    Patrick
    Participant

    Travis,
    There have been several discussions on SS implementations in this forum.  Check out old posts for some valuable insights.
    Remember that if you don’t get active support and championing at the highest level (whatever the organization), you’re in for trouble.
    Good luck,
    P

    0
    #78085

    Cannizzo
    Participant

    Travis,
    It sounds like you have a daunting task ahead of you, but one that has tremendous excitment and potential benefit. It is a very exciting position to be in.
    A couple of thoughts as I read your posting:

    Every business operates by processes. Most processes have defects. It’s our job to identify them and fix them so our businesses can make more money. This article really drives home this point: https://www.isixsigma.com/library/content/c020701a.asp
    The “Developing Black Belt Change Agents” article from this week is very good and applicable to your situation. You have to take your entire organization through a change process, and most people don’t embrace change. “Surviving Pity City And The Valley Of Despair” is a great title for this article! Have you read it?
    Good luck to you and your team!
    –Carol

    0
    #78088

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Travis,
    Like Carol said you are in a tough spot but guess what, it is the identical spot that everyone else is in when they start.
    Everyorganization has its politics. It is how the culture runs and maintains its self. If you bang heads with the culture of the company you will lose. I would start by setting up something around change and separate it from SS. When you finish your continuous improvement (that was joke from the quote string – people are truely funny when they don’t try to be) you will still need to retain the ability to implement change in the organization. Don’t confuse the two in their minds.
    Your business runs on stats. It is all probability. There are books on gaming theory. You might try contacting Rod Howes at [email protected]. He had a tape once that taught the tools using gambling. It might make the SS training a little more palatable.
    As far as your business being different. Not really. Your product maybe but I have seen some process that could easily be described as a “crap shoot.” In some cases we probably would have had better odds on a crap table. Aside from the gambling you run like everyone else. You have customers. Some thing please them some things don’t. It would probably be best if you could tell one from the other and then do the ones that please them a lot and try to eliminate the things that don’t (those are called defects).
    Once you can define and measure a defect the worst is over. You just analize the data.
    Good luck.

    0
    #78091

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Carol,
    Thank you for the recomendation. The “Pity City” and “Valley of Despair” came from Val.
    If more organizations would actually use people like Val in their area of expertise, Organizational Development, some of these change issues would be addressed on a day to day basis. In a lot of cases they use them about once per year for succession planning then they are an extra pair of hands in HR the rest of the year. They can bring real value in todays environment (since we don’t do much change these days SAP, SS, Lean, DFSS, etc.).
    Thanks again.

    0
    #78093

    Ovidiu Contras
    Participant

    Mike ,this is really the essence …very well said : “Once you can define and measure a defect the worst is over. You just analize the data.” .
    This is a candidate for Inspiring Quotes…..

    0
    #78094

    James A
    Participant

    Travis,
    In a way three of my colleagues and I are in a similar position to you – in that we, the BBs, are currently leading the drive to get 6S successfully introduced/implemented into the company – I believe (but I’m not yet totally convinced) that the management/champion support is there – it’s just that they’re mostly too busy to commit to supporting the program at present and cannot attend the relevant training for the aforementioned reason.
    The approach we are adopting is to be very careful what projects we select (high probability of initial success) and to create islands of excellence within the company during this process – the thing about success is that everyone likes to bask in its glory – even if they had nothing to do with creating it.  In a way we are ‘puppy selling’ the techniques – if this phrase does not make sense let me know.
    Also, we are careful not to let projects ‘die of old age’ – either through lack of activity by team members, or through lack of management support.  Lack of activity can be addressed by “selective attitudinal readjustment” – they took away our guns here in the UK, but electric cattle prods seem to work just fine.  Lack of management support is more difficult and relies entirely on the success factor of projects to swing the meter in your direction.
    It’s a tough one – but if you really want to do it you will – but it won’t happen fast, and it won’t be easy – but that’s the joy of being a BB.  If you can develop the right attitude (bulletproof and a huge sense of humour) you can also get a great deal of fun out of it.  If not – well I suppose you can always update your resumé.
    James A
     

    0
    #78096

    Sambuddha
    Member

    Very interesting topic.
    Travis,
    It reminds me of Mike’s (Carnell) comment (email) on the relative importance of leadership imperatives in case of a MBB compared to mastery over statistical  concepts. Same applies to a BB. It is not enough to survive in a political environment. A BB/MBB has to break cultural barriers (more like thick ice sheets in my opinion) in a sensitive manner. Part science, probably, part arts ?
    Anytime you have “stasis” in decision-making or mobilisation of support, it signals that you have too many managers and very few leaders. And if you all pause and think what a manager is normally expected to do (maintain the current status, while minimizing risk), you’ll realize why it happens that way.
    Change, on the other hand requires risk-taking.  You need enthusiastic, alive, persevering people. Look around and spot the leaders. Get them on your side, if you can.
    All said and done, it is a difficult job by any stretch of imagination and one that will generate insights into organizational reaction to the impetus of change. And hopefully you will share your unique experiences in an article like this one.
    Best,
    Sam

    0
    #78100

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Ovidiu,
    Thank you.

    0
    #78101

    Ovidiu Contras
    Participant

    Mike ,
    you’re welcome ! ….and I’m very serious about this…if during a project ,Define phase is overlooked , the whole project is at risk of loosing the focus (or worse ,focusing on something else than the real thing) and eventually fail…

    0
    #78110

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Ovidiu,
    I agree with you completely on the definition of a defect. We have watched people struggle to get projects started in virtually every wave we have done. If you get them to sit back and answer two questions:
    1 What is a defect?
    2. How do you measure it?
    It is a fairly obvious move from there.
    Thanks again.

    0
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.