iSixSigma

PFMEA Applicability in Job Shop

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General PFMEA Applicability in Job Shop

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #38709

    Antoine
    Participant

    I have one simple question : how do you manage to use the PFMEA in a job shop, where hundreds of different processes are regularly used and where over 1000 different parts are manufactured?
    We are a major part supplier for many truck and automotive company and we are not using PFMEA as effenciently as it should be. We would certainly need all the benefits from a well-tuned PFMEA system.
    One of our customer suggested to build PFMEA on machines or operations since we have to much parts to monitor. But we’re wondering how can we get specific enough to effenciently control and improve specific processes and parts.
    Does anyone have some experience on that matter, or would have some suggestions? Thanks.

    0
    #116288

    Deep
    Participant

    Did you try grouping parts that has same operations? Try grouping the parts and make FMEA for the group.

    0
    #116765

    tundrafrost
    Member

    The key word is process, break down each process as to potential failures.

    0
    #116766

    tundrafrost
    Member

    The key word is process, break down each process as to potential failures.

    0
    #116770

    Thaly
    Member

    Are you convinced that any kind of PMs dont work for you? I don’t believe PFMEA is the right way to approach your problem, and I work in a very similar type of company as you. There are no documented benefits of using APQP as far as I know. I like to think of APQP as purchasing automobile insurance. If you have an expensive vehicle and you are an inexperienced driver, you’d purchase an expensive and comprehensive insurance. If you are an experienced driver and your vehicle is a 85 Honda, the state minimum shall suffice.
    1. PFMEA is supposed to be a live document. you will find it very hard to keep it so, especially in your case.
    2. PFMEA does very little to improve your process efficiently.
    3. It is expensive and requires a lot of focussed team work.
    4. PFMEA will only be as good as the knowledge of the most experienced team member.
    5. The only place you should use it is when you know that the part you are producing is a highly critical part and you can justify the cost of creating a FMEA and keeping it alive.

    0
    #116799

    Ashman
    Member

    Antoine,
    Generic Process maps and FMEA’s for job shops may satisfy internal or external customer requirements, but can sometimes do little for the company when trying to prevent rework and scrap. They will however serve as a decent starting point for a part specific process map and FMEA.
    We are required by one of our customers to perform these FMEA’s, and used to supply them with generic process maps and FMEA’s that focused on the process only. We all know however that different parts have different requirements and behave differently when being manufactured. Process specific FMEA’s will not cover all the nuances of each part, leaving the company’s risk for rework and scrap high. They did not prevent all the issues.
    However, If you develop a set of process specific maps and FMEA’s, then append them to cover all the things that can go wrong with the part, you prevention will be greater. This however is time consuming up front, but will pay off in the long run.
    Probably not the answer you wanted to hear. Good Luck

    0
    #123649

    mocons
    Participant

    I am a Project Engineer in a similar situation, and I break down the possible FMEAs by process when I quote the parts initially. I agree that the only FMEA’s that are kept “Live” are those that are for major parts… those that are most important economically to our company. We have far fewer processes than parts. But I also agree that not all failure modes might be anticipated. FMEA’s still are valuable tools.

    0
    #123650

    Da Rovester
    Participant

    Hi Thaly,
    We are also a Job Shop, OEM Manufacturer and it was communicated to me, by a Sr. QE that PFMEA is required to determine the sample size of a qualification run – PQ. Is such a time intensive and expensive project really required for sample size determination?  Please advise.
    Thanks.

    0
Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.