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Productivity – Flowchart and VSM

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums Methodology Productivity – Flowchart and VSM

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #55722

    MPBatista
    Participant

    Hi there,

    I started a project about increasing Productivity in a process which has many manual processes and chemical as well. We will probably need to understand some details from chemical processes to get deeper in each X. So in this way I believe that a Flow chart with decisions will help us to understand this non-manual processes. Regarding Manual processes, the cycle time will be really important to redesign the process lately. In this case I think that the VSM will help more my team.

    So I’m considering to develop the Flow chart and VSM in the Measure Phase.

    What do you think about this thoughts?

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    #201342

    Strayer
    Participant

    Before you enter the Measure phase you need to have a clear and specific problem statement. It sounds like you aren’t ready for Measure. Mapping the process with flowchart, VSM, and maybe some other tools will help you to understand what’s happening, identify the problem areas and find a big one to target for improvement. In my experience people all too often start with a general problem and goal, such as improving productivity, and jump into Measure without knowing what variables to measure. That’s a recipe for failure. So consider this essential preliminary work.

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    #201343

    MPBatista
    Participant

    Hello Strayer,

    Thanks so much. We have a problem statement and a specific(however it’s big, but has an explanation) goal, which is to increase the parts produced per hour. Imagine a running machine(it’s not but you can compare with it and it has great difficults to change machine layout, machine mechanics – it’s a huge machine – and so forth) with many manual processes and chemical as well. We want to increase parts/hour from this. So as we don’t have other projects running, we decided to scope all of this running machine and increase productivity. Yeap, I understand your point and it would be better having many projects running in parallel for each major process and after all this projects completed, we improve the whole running machine. Today, it’s difficult for us to run many Six Sigma projects.

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    #201345

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    I’d look into calculating OEE on the bottleneck portion of the process to get success.

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    #201346

    MPBatista
    Participant

    Hi Chris Seider,

    Thanks! Yes, however my process is like a running machine with constant speed and it doesn’t stop(Unless we have an emergency). I can reduce cycle time from a process(bottleneck) and get a higher speed for it. However, all of these processes are connected by this “running machine”, so higher speed for one process is a higher speed for the other processes as well and we don’t know if it’s suitable or not. So we need to understand the whole process to increase our Y(Parts/hour).

    Thanks!

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    #201347

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    I’d love to see it but I can’t imagine a process where everything (different steps in a process) all work at the exact same speed and all ramp up equally the same. However, you’re closer to it but if you have inventory in between the steps–they don’t operate at the same exact speed. What type of product/process are you referencing?

    You stated you have manual processes. This would seem to add noise to output. Also, are you ABSOLUTELY sure the process NEVER changes speed for that main automated machine? I highly doubt that.

    I’ll reemphasize to investigate using OEE. If you have no availability, quality, or performance losses, then you’d be the first. Of course, we’re not sure of what you’re referencing when you say the whole “process”.

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