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Project Identification Process

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  • #50187

    torres
    Participant

    Experts,
    I am starting a New Continuous Process Improvement Program at my company of 400+ people.  I need a process to generate projects.   The only thing that I brainstormed is to meet with senior leaders and have them brainstorm ideas and then look at the feasibility.
    Is there a Six Sigma process out there to help identify projects and fill the pipeline of work?   Any tools that can help?  Any templates? etc..
    Please help
    Julia

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    #172463

    Brandon
    Participant

    Check http://www.opensourcesixsigma.com for their Project Selection Process. I’ve used it with clients and have generated a significant number of initial projects and continued usage provides a continued string of projects.

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    #172464

    torres
    Participant

    I could not find a project selection process on the site?  Do you have the link?

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    #172465

    Brandon
    Participant

    I see what you mean Julia. It’s under Learn – Managers.
    Here’s the link – http://www.opensourcesixsigma.com/node/69

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    #172471

    Michael Mead
    Participant

    Hello Julia,
    An easy way to identify potential projects is to look at customer complaints. Another, is any manufacturing variances. If you use these 2 ideas, you don’t need to dig too deeply. The reports are already there, and you should have a headstart on your metrics too.

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    #172472

    parag
    Participant

    Hi,
    I follow these two methods to start a project as mentioned below,
    1) Drop a pareto for various categories that u might have in ur process. This will help u know the top 2-3 pain areas in the process based on data and then u can take it forward based on the priority that a org wants to set to various categories.
    2)Collect VOC from internal and external customers to understand their pain areas, needs,expectations.
    You can reach me on [email protected] for more info.
    Regards,
    Parag

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    #172474

    Fake Consultant
    Participant

    The stuff is for sale,it is not free
     

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    #172494

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Julia,
    You start with a conversation with the Leadership Team and find out what it is you are supposed to deliver. If you run off with the best little methodology in the world and identify the best cost savings projects ever and the Leadership Team wants to increase throughput you are going to have a very short career.
    Just my opinion.

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    #172573

    Thales
    Member

    Julia,
    A way to avoid this kind of pitfall that Mike said is to understand the business needs, and you can do it by knowing the strategic plan of your company. Aks the leadership to share the Strategic Plan with you. Thus, you will be able to see the “true north” and than you can drill down looking for oportunities.
    Once you find a “wish list”, you use a prioritization matrix (I use an “Attractiveness & Risk analysis” but any kind of prioritization process works) to select the right projects.
    I use this process once a year to select the “big projects” (in my case, every time the leadership review the strategic plan). For smaller projects, you can try to understand the local needs (business unit, department, etc).

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    #172575

    Bode
    Participant

    Depending on the size of your organization and the level of commitment of your senior managers, you should consider value stream analysis and Hoshin Planning (Hoshin kanri) as ways to identify improvement opportunities.  A value stream analysis takes a high level look at a number of processes that transform raw materials into final products to identify those areas having the greatest opportunity for improvement.  Typically, a VSA takes 2 to 3 days.  Hoshin Planning is really about implementing your companies strategic goals.  Using Hoshin planning will help to align your improvement initiatives toward accomplishing a few common goals.  Hoshin planning will involve all parts of your organization and requires a high level of commitment from your senior managers.  You can google these for more information.
    Dave

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    #172615

    Stephanie
    Member

    You could do this by setting up Kaizen team.

    This gives employees a voice as there know the business. 
    Moves the decision making to staff that work the front line.
    Gets buy in from the staff from the very start.
    Basically getting staff involved to brainstorm ideas, then affinity group these.  When you have sub groups these could then be taken away and further information such as costs, time, importance to customer etc could be collated and each idea rated against these.  This would then form a priority list to work from.
    The main key is asking staff for their opionion, they know the work and the problems/issues that need resolved.  Also setting up a suggestions system soo staff can provide ideas.
    I have some slides on setting up Kaizen teams if you want more information. 
    Hope the above helps
    Steph

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