iSixSigma

Projects development and Pipeline

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Projects development and Pipeline

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #36772

    Nwajei
    Participant

    I am a certified BB and has recently been engaged in assisting the MBB in my organization to develop and scope defined projects for a pool of BBs.  Developing this project pipeline has been an extreme challenge and I not sure if we are approaching it in the right way.  I was told that a project must isolate a “defect” first while my thoughts lean towards indentifying the metrics that measures the “pain” of the business (which could be the same).  
    Are there recommended guidelines or thoughts in projects development that I can reference which will allow the MBB to encapsulate customer and business issues into manageable six sigma projects? 
    Any input would be most appreciated.
    Thanks.
    Frank 

    0
    #106891

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Frank,
    When you start a deployment typically your data is pretty bad so expecting to isolate a defect is a pretty big stretch. First the Process Owners should be filling the pipeline not BB’s. They are not spectators. If you have BB responsible for project identification then it is easy for them to p–s all over everything like a drunken alley cat. They own the process they control the resources they need to pick projects and get a financial analysis complete (initially – check out the article written by Cristian Ulloa still on the iSixSigma home page). How else can you make a business decision that it is a viable project. The charter/problem statement is written in terms of the Y variable (Y = f(x)).
    The pipeline is not a MBB/BB/GB responsibility. It is where a PO submits work to be done and something like a SS steering Committee decides what projects have priority and what projects align with the company goals.
    You don’t need recomended guidelines or some other pontification from people who mostly have never copleted a project in their lives. Treat your pipeline just like a SS project – start with a map and not some microcosim SIPOC. Jerry Garcia Theory – stay as high as you can for as long as you can – 30,000 foot from Idea generation (which is different from Project selection to Execution (read Bossidy’s book). Figure out where it makes sense to shift ownership.
    Just my opinion.
    Good luck.

    0
    #106894

    Mikel
    Member

    Hey, I like the Jerry Garcia Theory analogy.
    I personally subscribe to the Willie Nelson Theory, but I think it has a lot in common with the Jerry Theory. Grateful Dead was pretty country when you get down to it.

    0
    #106898

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Stan,
    I stole it from Rob Tripp. he has always been a little bit bohemian.
    The dead played Willies 4th of July concert in 2003. Neil Young also. Good memories. More intersting crowd.
    Regards

    0
    #107274

    James C. Bailey,Jr.
    Participant

    Frank,
       Your question is so fundamental to the Six Sigma methodology. The answer lies in the quality of the raw “Voice of the Customer” data. Most Six Sigma training does not teach you how to extract the data very well. They jump from VOC to CTQs in deliverable 1 of the DMAIC methodology. But how? Your organization should have guidance principles for the business, called COTs( Critical Operating Tasks). If they don’t, then you, the MBB, or the Champion need to perform a CTQ Flowdown. Start by listing the overall objectives of the company or business. For example, the business will generate $X MM of revenue in 2004. Where will it come from? List the specific products and goods that will contribute to the above rollup revenue. Next, list how you are doing year-to-date versus the expected revenue,i.e., the “gap analysis”. Continue with the others objectives,i.e., earnings top line growth,etc..From the gap analysis, draft a problem statement that answers four questions: What is the defect? Where is it occurring? How do you know? What is the magnitude?  If you did nothing, what is the impact on the business? You can hand this over to a qualified Black Belt and develop the project deliverables and the subsequent improved process. Hope this helps!
                                                             Jim

    0
    #107337

    Nwajei
    Participant

    Jim,
    thanks for the reply. What you are referring to is the “roadmap” of the strategic objectives/mission.  Unfortunately, (in my humble opinion), we have no shortage of executives that can tell us what the company needs to do to attain financial targets but very few that have the leadership and even the courage to take on the risk of developing a well though out “roadmap” (the “how”).  Unfortunately (again), they resort to the “magical” Six Sigma to give them those insights but only for their short term view and objectives.
    This is why I emphasize and re-emphasize the “C” of DMAIC.  It is because of the control mechanisms implemented do the processes become more permanent and hopefully ingrained into the culture of the company.  I often emphasize the requirement (not just need) that the controls mechanisms established in the “C” of DMAIC be linked to the job description of the process owners.  In all my training, I never heard how the Human Resource department should be linked as a critical stakeholder to ensure more permanent implementation of key processes that will sustain the gains.  Without this critical piece, you have mere “short sightedness”.
    Thanks again for your thoughts.
    Frank

    0
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.