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Re: Machine downtime data collection

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  • #37885

    Abdelaziz Moustafa
    Participant

    Hello
    I found that we lose 15% of the machine time every week in setup including the qulaity approval process and first piece approval….does anyone can give me an idea on how to collect data for Hypothesis, SPC, Multi var., and could help me in my DOE.
    Thank you ALL

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    #113168

    Gutierrez
    Participant

    The best method is to capture the minutes that are being lost for each particular action.  If you don’t have a software already capturing this information (or you are not sure of its reliablility), the easiest method is to place a log near the machine and require operators to document the amount of time that each step takes them.  I would have them document a start time and completion time, so that you do not end up with “rounded out” values.  As far as setting up a DOE, you don’t have a lot of information here to go on.  But, you can compare shifts, machine to machine, comparing time can be much more complicated than comparing actual mechanical responses.  Hope this helps.

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    #113170

    Tronan
    Member

    Why do people like to live in a world of complication? DOE???
    List every event which happens during the set up, from the last piece coming off the machine, to the first good part comming off of the machine post set up.
    Do this in high detail, then time each element, then brainstorm how you erase each element of the set up process….. no rocket science required. If you would like a form to do this you can use the one that I have for reducing the set up times and run times. Just give me an e-mail address.
    On the back of that…. run OEE metrics.
    T.

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    #113175

    Ben Royal
    Participant

    We’ve spent a lot of time lately on machine downtime. The approach is simple: a team is assigned to conduct corrective action on every downtime indicent over a certain length of time. The keys is effective root cause determination.
    A nice part of this effort is the attention our Senior Director pays to the process. He never misses the daily report-out meeting.
    Finally, we are now taking a hard look at our TPM planning process and are implementing OEE on key pieces of equipment.

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    #113176

    Dixit
    Member

    Hi Moustafa,
    Prior to get the data on the machine downtime, study the tool change frequencies, and other time when the machine is down for example lunck break, maintenance, house keeping etc. These are called Non-Cyclic times on the machine.
    Collect this data over a period of time till you are familiar with the process. Now once you have collected the data on the causes of machine down time you should be able to analyze and identify the root cause. This is a simple and reliable process that i have followed. So let me know if this was useful.
    Good Luck

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    #113178

    np
    Participant

    SMED! Single Minute Exchange of Dies.  As a part of Lean Six Sigma the SMED process is used to reduce changeover and set up times on machines.  It works great!
    Basically it involves video taping a changeover, watch the video and document each step (even insignificant ones such as turning around to grab something), and marking down the time for each step.  After you do that you will have a list of steps (many times it’s more than 100) and the times associated with each one.  Then you look through the steps and identify the waste and watch the video all the way through without stopping to write down steps or times.
    After you have watched the video through at least a couple of times and identified the waste, you come up with and implement the changes to reduce or eliminate that waste.  It may be as simple as moving tools closer to the machine or organizing the tools.  5S!
    Once you have implemented your changes and the operator is comfortable with the new process, you then tape the changeover again.  The you again document the steps and times to show the improvement.
    Most of the time you can reduce your changeover time by at least 50% on the first go around.  Then if you still need to reduce more, you do it again.
    Keep in mind, during all of this it is important that the operator is part of the whole process.  If you have 2nd and 3rd shift operators, involve them too.  You will probably notice that all three operators do things different, but they will also have different and good insight on how to make it better.
    Hope this helps!

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    #113180

    Tronan
    Member

    Only two things to add to that….
    Propose the video idea tactfully if it is the first time you have done it in the factory, some people don’t take too kindly to it at first, kinda take it personal.
    The other being Muda elimination. Look it up on the web to add to NP’s answer great answer.
    T.

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    #113182

    jdb
    Participant

    Tronan,
    Please send a copy of your form to [email protected].  Thanks.  I know it will help all the other Six Sigma “newbys” out too. Please refresh.. what do the initials DOE stand for?

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    #113185

    Tronan
    Member

    Hi,
    Design Of Experiments, roughly speaking, it is where you look at several independant variables which affect your process (dependant variable), and gives you the desired settings for the output you want. An example of this would be the settings of a moulding machine where you have lost the manual and you can’t get another one. Not that I have ever had to do that….. Honest.
    The form is on its way.
    T.

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    #113189

    JX
    Participant

    I was recently invloved with a Kaizen event being held around product changes. This was the first time I had ever been involved with an event like this. Our event was a disaster, in my opinion. One of the things I felt we did wrong was not correctly identifying the customer. We had identified the customer as the end user of our product (purchaser). I felt like the customer should have been internal. The entire product change process would be waste to the external customer. An internal customer such as a production manager would have a more vested intrest in reducing product change times since it may directly impact his/her COT’s. In our case this may have dramatically affected the outcome of the event since this would change how we identify waste. My point is to make sure you identify the customer correctly before labeling steps as waste. Does anyone agree with this and why/why not?

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    #113193

    np
    Participant

    Thanks Tronan!
    You are correct.  You have to make sure they understand that it is not to monitor their performance, but to help them improve the way they do their job and to make their job easier.  That is why it is very important that you make sure the operators are involved.  You can’t just go out there, video tape them, analyze it yourself, and then go back to them and tell them they have to make all these changes.
    NP

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    #113219

    Tronan
    Member

    Hi JX,
    Well done for giving it a go. I hope you stood up and tried again.
    Well, its all about the wonderful world of Stakeholder analysis, and who is really the customer?
    At the beginning of your Blitz event you need to look at two things, who has vested interest in your project / Blitz? These are the Stakeholders, you need to understand these people’s wants, needs and expectations from what you are about to do. For example the manager in your example is a stake holder. One of the things I do is integrate the RACI concept into my Action registers, and attribute each action a person who is Responsible, Accountable, Consulted and Informed. One of these people will invariably be a stake holder in the process.
    As for who the customer is. Well the manager was the customer of the deliverable of your Blitz, and that all folks, and for that they gain stakeholder status.
    The customer in a process is the next element in your chain of processes. For example, a works order is kitted in the stores, the customer of the stores person is the line leader, the customer for the line leader is the first person in the Production process, and so on, till the product gets to the customer who actually paid for the product.
    This is a very important concept to instil into a work environment that you should always consider your customer, don’t pass on scrap, don’t over produce, don’t make the distance between the processes too far etc etc etc…. Muda elimination and 5S.
     I hope that diluted the mud into a clearer looking glass, if not let me know, and I’ll have another go:)
    T.
     

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    #131688

    RadZ
    Participant

    Tronan,
    Please send me a copy of your machine setup/down-time form. I would like to compare it with what I have.
    Thanks.
     

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    #162872

    Shane Quigley
    Member

    Hi Tronan could you mail me the sheet you use for downtime capture please

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    #175419

    Varun
    Member

    Hi Tronan,
    I know this thread is over three years old, but i have just read it now.
    I am about to finish a project with a company and we are trying to reduce the downtime of a machine. I did something similar to what you have mentioned and it worked well for me. I managed to record accurate downtime for every cause and then analysed how much was justified or not. Was interesting to read about the form you talk about in your post to record the data. Can i get a copy of it please ?
    Thanks,
    Varun

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    #179172

    Don BIN95.com
    Participant

    Also a more clear understanding of the “True Downtime Cost” can be found at http://www.downtimecentral.com

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    #179173

    Dennis Z
    Participant

    If yuo already know what is causing it ie setup and inspection, just approach it from a setup reduction format and divide the tasks into internal and external.  There is a lot of information in setup reduction and I  would be willing to gues that by simply focusing on it will reduce your downtime by at least 50% with no capital investment

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    #184365

    Saud
    Member

    Hi my email address is [email protected] please write me back, thanksRegards
    Saud Ch

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    #184366

    Saud
    Member

    Send me the form asap, thanks

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    #185364

    Michelle S.
    Participant

    Tronan, can you please send me a copy of the downtime form used on the floor?  We are looking at reducing changeover time.
    Thanks, Michelle

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    #185365

    Jered Horn
    Participant

    Good luck with that, Michelle. This thread is almost
    5 years old.

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    #185366

    Taylor
    Participant

    Michelle
    Where would you like Tronan to send it to? Just guessing that Tronan is not pyschic, but you never know..
    Also note that the post is 4 years old, doubtful you will get a reply, but again you just never know around here……
     

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    #185370

    Michelle S.
    Participant

    Tronan or anyone else who may have a downtime collection form for machine downtime, could you please send an example form to [email protected]
    Thank you, Michelle

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