iSixSigma

Safety Related Projects

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Safety Related Projects

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #30121

    Eddie Robertson
    Participant

    Hello Everyone,
    I have recently become a Green Belt and I am wondering if there are others out there that are looking at Safety related projects to take on. If so, can anyone give me some ideas as to what type of safety related projects there are to work on. It seems much easier to come up with projects to help increase yields, cut down fuel usage, etc but, I am having a more difficult time trying to come up with valid Safety related projects to explore. If anyone can offer suggestions or help me in this area it would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Eddie Robertson
     
     

    0
    #78126

    James A
    Participant

    Eddie,
    I confess that I am not working on any safety type stuff, but if I may offer some thoughts for guidance:
    Firstly – what does your ‘customer’ expect as an outcome of your project?  This answer may start to define it straight away.  If your customer doesn’t know, then try the following:-
    What are the main safety issues you have?  If you’re in a manufacturing environment, perhaps you could pareto the injuries logged over the last year – e.g. fingers 25, toes 10, legs 7, arms 3, head 2, and then examine the data for fingers and toes to see if there are any further pareto(e)s you can do to isolate causes of injury – e.g. cuts, pinching, dropping parts, manual handling errors, forklift accidents etc.
    Doing this will help to highlight where you need to start your project, and will help to define it more clearly – e.g. Finger injuries due to forklift errors.  Then you can start to investigate how the injuries occured, and develop ideas how to prevent recurrence.
    Project definition is the difficult stage – for everyone – but it gets easier with practice.  As some famous golfer once said in response to a question why he was so lucky in winning tournaments: “It’s strange but the more I practice, the luckier I get”
    Hope this helps.

    0
    #78127

    Eddie Robertson
    Participant

    James,
     Thank you for the response, I really appreciate your help.
    Eddie Robertson
     

    0
    #78128

    Anonymous
    Participant

    Also, look at your cost issues.  What are your losses due to lost time?  What about Workers Comp?  Any opportunities there?

    0
    #78130

    Robert Butler
    Participant

      The usual focus of safety efforts in any situation is to increase safety by reducing accidents or their causes.  Several years ago I did precisely what James A recommended except instead of looking at just a single year worth of data I managed to locate the OSHA reports for the past 20 years.  By running a number of pareto and time series plots of the data I managed to identify several broad trends in accident frequency and types which had completely eluded everyone for the simple reason that most of the safety stats that had been presented over the years were nothing more than a comparison of this year with last year. I was also able to identify groups most at risk.  This last permitted a better focus of safety efforts and it also eliminated a number of meaningless practices that had been put in place.
      Central to the effort was the fact that in spite of the time involved there had been no major change in accident type over the 20 years.  The single biggest problem that I had with the analysis was convincing management that the analysis was valid.  The argument offered was that things had changed so much that I was comparing apples and oranges by looking at such a long time line.  The rebuttal to this was that I was able to show that for any multi-year period there was no significant difference in types of accidents and their frequencies.
      I’m offering this war story to highlight some of the things that you might want to try with your own data.  If you are U.S. based you may have trouble getting more than 5 years worth of data.  There is/was a 5 year limit on data retention and many companies will delete data the second 5 years have passed.  Even 5 years of data will be better than one or two and you have a better chance of spotting trends that simply won’t be apparent with one or two years worth of data.  You might also want to contrast the OSHA and non-OSHA types of accidents over time.  In my case there was pretty good agreement but you won’t know for sure unless you check.
     

    0
    #78133

    Eddie Robertson
    Participant

    Robert,
     
     Thank you very much for the helpful information. I sincerely appreciate it.
    Thanks,
    Eddie Robertson

    0
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.