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Six Sigma and Change Management

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Six Sigma and Change Management

This topic contains 22 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  Tim Hutzel 15 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #28127

    GE MBB
    Participant

    Going by the number of responses on NO SUPPORT following is even more relevant!
    Very few people outside GE know that the real success factors behind GE’s Six Sigma Program is its earlier two programs called Work-out (Welch’s first program during early 1980s to empower each and every GE employee) and CAP(Change Acceleration Process-introduced at GE during mid-nineties to deal with and accelerate CHANGE). Those who have been with GE would agree and understand the importance of dealing with people’s mindsets and other ‘soft issues’ and for those who are not / have not worked at GE , you may read George Eckes book titled MAKING SIX SIGMA LAST- it is based on the same concepts as GE’s Change program. (Of course George has inducted need of an outside consultant as one of the desired factors!)
    As per GE model there are seven elements to effectively deal with Change- all are important but the two most critical of these seven are Leading Change and Aligning Systems and Structures of an organization to support Change.
    It will be a good investment at 30 odd dollars and you will get some wonderful practical tips for dealing with resistance not only to Six Sigma but in general for any major change initiative. There are tools and methods available for you to use in your change (six sigma) initiatives.
    Folks, hard stuff is easy! Good training  can develop a good Black Belt for understanding and application of statistical tools.
    It is the ‘soft stuff’ which is HARD to deal with!
    Sometimes we as Six Sigma professionals and experts fail to recognize this soft side and our inability to deal with this may result in less than desirable effectiveness of our efforts.
    Don’t you agree?!

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    #69703

    Niraj Goyal
    Participant

    Hello,
    Could not agree more! Mindset is certainly the key if not the major factor in the success of six sigma.
    Knowing the techniques is not enough!
    Niraj

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    #69732

    GE BB
    Participant

    Well said….irrespective of the company one is working for…..wherever the word change comes along comes resistance & full points to GE for creating such programs that complement six sigma and takes care of the softer hurdles that arises in every project….this has worked amazingly well for GE…& for every GE employee

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    #69744

    Taylor
    Member

    As I work more and more with business improvement projects, I’ve become convinced that the “soft” issues are the most difficult, critical, challenging, frustrating and even interesting issues.  We’re good at identifying problems, root causes, redesigning processes and moving people around on the org chart, but the lack of sustainable results always goes back to the people and the extent to which they resist change.  Another good book on the topic is Kotter’s “Leading Change”.
    As an internal consultant at our company, our improvement methodology calls for a stakeholder enrollment activity for every project and when teams attempt to brush it aside, we trot out the info and data on projects that have failed due to ignoring this critical aspect of any project.  We also have an internal Organizational Effectiveness consultant available for our teams as a resource for coaching, consulting and training.

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    #69756

    AnonymousBB
    Participant

    I could not agree more strongly.  Especially the part about Aligning Systems and Structures to support Change.  That is the step they seem to have left out / skipped over in my organization.  And therefore we have lots of resistance to organizationally-optimum changes when they threaten a local “sweet spot” in some system.  What’s worse, the local managers / supervisors / process owners try to blame the Black Belts or 6 Sigma for this “negative” effect.  This frustrates and discourages the BB’s, makes it harder to recruit them, and  is slowing progress all around. 
    And it surely doesn’t help to have my assigned MBB say “well, that’s the way they designed this program, so you just have to live with it.”  I have much more confidence in my own research and my contacts within Motorola and TI on how to get things done than this guy is able to provide, for all his “reverse mentoring” assignments.
      
     

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    #69939

    “Ken”
    Participant

    The GE message about the need for change management was heard loud and clear at Sun Microsystems, mainly due to the close relationship between the two CEOs. As a result, change management was introduced at the same time as Six Sigma (which was re-named Sun Sigma within Sun). Sun is now in the process of developing its own change management model and tool set and has plans to roll this out for handling much more than just the changes introduced through the Sun Sigma methodology.The heart of the new approach is to gain commitment to making the change work. All the elements of an effective change (such as stakeholder work, defining the need and vision, developing a roadmap for the change, enlisting support, handling resistance, and altering the systems and structures to make change last) are focused on gaining and keeping individual commitment.

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    #69948

    Kelly Maidman
    Participant

    I couldn’t agree more.   It’s heartbreaking to see companies try to implement SS without taking into account, the people-side of things.   IMHO, SS Success (true Success) is a holistic approach.  
    A trained monkey can use the tools, but who is going to recognize, then effectively deal with resistence?
    Mission first, People always!
    -Kel

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    #69950

    muhannad al nabulsi
    Participant

    O.K:But I have very bad experience with the french multi-national  cement group (Lafarge),in her way to integrate local companies all over the world,has adopted what can be called “semi-colonial “attitude.At first she has attracted local goverments to purchase high shares through “strategic partner-ship”program,then initiated  achange management program(selecting  a local  champion),then latter dismiss every positive trend (team work,employees involvement,respect,transperency,accountability,dismissing good experience local staff,& they don’t believe in action plans or all the other TQ tools including sixsigma…etc),they believe only on  ‘money talk”and always using  “exhortion” (against  deming rule).now can you tell me how such multi-national group can succeed and make profit??
    Is it the  “great’gap between practice and theory or what???
    Thanks for presenting your opinion as i’m really confused.
                                                         MUHANNAD

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    #69953

    Mikel
    Member

    For every GE employee? What BS! Why have so many left GE if life is so good?

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    #69964

    Schmidt
    Participant

    I think the reason is that GE employees want to be able to “stand out” as change agents in other organizations who are just starting their Six Sigma programs.  They won’t be just a number there, and they will be looked at as an opinion leader among many novices instead of an expert number among many other expert numbers. 
    GE, Motorola, and Honeywell blackbelts are in major demand out there because of the fact that those companies have proven track records and saved millions as a result of their “flavor” of the approach.
     
    Marcus  

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    #69990

    Patrick Waddick
    Participant

    I would concur that some of the GE BBs and MBBs may have left the company simply because they wanted to seize an opportunity elsewhere where they could stand out in a crowd and test their skills on a company just starting out on Six Sigma.GE probably knows the main reasons why employees leave the company. They conduct ongoing research on that issue. But GE will always seek to hire the best and brightest talent in the world to help them sustain their advantage in the markets they serve. So, at the very least, what GE has is a revolving door of talented individuals coming in and out of the company. But make no mistake about it, they know where the break even point is on the investments they make with their BBs and MBBs. And the net income just keeps rolling in.Life was indeed good at GE. Things were neat, orderly, and logical. You knew where you fit in and you were given a permanent license to challenge the status quo to make things dramatically better. As stated earlier in posts, Six Sigma worked at GE because they spent years developing the infrastructure and culture that would support a Six Sigma initiative. The most valuable tools you learned as a BB or MBB at GE were on the Change Acceleration Process (Change Management). No Black Belt, in my opinion, can succeed and consistently deliver results without it. Understanding the theory behind Six Sigma is not enough. Passing a certification test is also not enough. They are helpful, but the truth is that there are plenty of resistors, obstacles, and roadblocks out there that can derail a Six Sigma project at any given moment. You have to be prepared to remove those barriers to success and energize a team. That can’t be taught in a textbook alone.

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    #70194

    Chad
    Participant

    Some left to implement what we learned at GE in other companies.  Some left because they couldn’t accept the future of GE being Six Sigma.  I speak from the former and realize GE is way ahead of most corporations in Change Management!!!!

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    #79443

    CA
    Participant

    Everyone wants to change……….so long as its the other guy that has to change and not them

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    #79463

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    A lot of people leave GE because they can, which isn’t the case for a lot of other companies. In general having GE on your resume is a plus.
    Recruiters target GE because it is a high performance company. Their people can be placed with less effort than a person with obscure references.
    The real question is why are GE employees so desirable to other companies?

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    #79466

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    Yeah, GE and Honeywell (AlliedSignal)  have been deemed, “CEO Farms”.   Both are great place to be from.
    Here are a few hi-prof companies among many, that bought “cows” from GE and HON:
    Raytheon Missile Systems
    3M
    Home Depot
    Intuit
    There are plenty more too!
    -Heebee

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    #79469

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    H.,
    They let GE sort out the performers then take the ones they can. The interesting part is how well do they perform outside the GE system? So was it Welch who knew how to create a culture that enabled high performance or can they do it without the system?

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    #79470

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    Personally, I’d say, “Situation Dictates”.
    Some are more successful than others in operating outside the GE/HON SS culture.
    What do you think, Mike?

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    #81592

    BBTT
    Participant

    So how can I get my hands on this GE change model?????  I want to see it, read it and live it!
    I’m reading “Leading Change”…does anyone have recommendations for other books? 
     

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    #85832

    haider
    Participant

    People resist to change because they have already invested their tima and much more to creat present status of company whatsoever it is.
    Also fear of unknown circumstances creat such feeling.
    Affiliations of the past system, successes and achievements.
    Method adapted to bring change.
    Care for the presently working if ignored will cause resistance to change.
     

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    #93588

    Carolina Bensusan
    Participant

    I agree definetly!! If you are not aware of the importance (60%) of the soft side, you are going to fail… or, even worth:  the change is going to be “short term” and the people from the business is going to be hard to move if we have other / next programme to implement… Actually I worked for a company which pass throught several programmes and it was hard when we started to implement Six Sigma… Hope it help! 

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    #94199

    Sam Jalal
    Member

    Hi Muhannad,
    Like you .. I worked for a large American Corporation (Automotive) but working in France and with french nationals and a poor management team. Speaking fluent french .. you would think that I had a fighting chance. I am sorry to say that I experienced much the same of what you are describing. There was a failure in management to initiate a change management programe along side the six-sigma programe. Infact ; there management style was to thrive on chaos as long as the money kept on coming -in .. ”Short term thinking with no future”.
    Management are people too and they are the stakeholders that must be convinced to lead the change within the comapny using you as a change agent.. if they do not; the program is doomed to failure !!! This is a sad fact of life .. but I believe that French companies need to evolve with the times .. language and culture is of course a barrier !!
    Sam

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    #94247

    muhannad al nabulsi
    Participant

    Sam
    I’m really happy that al least one expert has agreed with me,even after a long time.I believe we should not find excuses to those CEOs who misguide their companies by pretending and manipulating.The right thing is just to allow other business people to discover their misbehave and bad practice.This how we can be honest and proffesional.Just my humble opinion,kind regards

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    #94294

    Tim Hutzel
    Member

    I was heavily involved in change management at GE Aircraft Engines and have always found the CAP model incredibly practical and necessary.  After I left GE, I helped form a Lean 6 Sigma consulting firm that has been exteremly successful in helping clients customize a Lean 6 Sigma environment by applying CAP.  Those interested can go to http://www.MainStreamLean.com

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