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Six Sigma at Japan

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Viewing 14 posts - 101 through 114 (of 114 total)
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  • #160900

    Severino
    Participant

    I never said they use Six Sigma.  I did say that they use a lot of tools and techniques which are also part of Six Sigma.  The point was that if you forget the name for a second a lot of what you see at Honda & Toyota would be mirrored at a SS company.  Therefore any criticisms levied against SS are also a partial criticism directed at elements of their quality system as well. 
    As far as the belts goes, it seems like you are hostile because of issues you have with your own ego.  I choose to look on the bright side, you sir may continue to look on the negative.  It changes nothing.  Good day. 

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    #160902

    Craig
    Participant

    John W,
    Could you explain your point about how you were certified? I am not sure how using your skills as a path to certification is any different than the other bazillion black belts out there. If your point relates to your post-graduate education, what’s the big deal? If your company recognized you as a proficient user of these skills as well as being a change agent, then you meet the whole concept of the belt system. I sure hope you are spreading your knowlege to all the parasites to help them earn their salary. A true black belt or MBB would do that rather than moan and groan about the belt system.
    And you are wrong, Ford needed belts to drive some of his equipment. Hey, maybe it was his idea. (Belts = drivers of things?)

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    #160911

    John W
    Participant

    OK, just because I enjoy a lame joke… BTW…I have a kuro obi in Uechiru so I view this whole belt thing with quite a chuckle. If you have no idea what that meant, don’t worry about it. My point about belts is they are not the end all change agents. Having a six sigma belt does not make you a leader or a change agent, but I can see from this board it can make you a pest. It’s always been my position a good manager knows his/her processes. He/she knows what is done by the person and/or office above, below and lateral. A good organization does not need designated change agents if they have a culture of change. The other responder quite rightly recognized that any corporation with a good, responsive quality control program, with decision driven to the lowest possible level, and a firm in regular discussion with their customer to determine what is important to measure, could be mistaken as a six sigma corporation. That does not justify six sigma, nor should someone make the mistake of thinking a firm like that could be even better if it had six sigma belts. I was blessed with the opportunity to sit through two weeks of corporate training, training they paid some consultant dearly for, so that I could be “certified.” I managed to keep my mouth shut while the instructor said things like “regression analysis cannot be used to predict future results.” If this seems like a fast-track program, the reason I’m certified is because I already have completed dozens of quality improvement projects, and the projects incorporated all or many of the components of Lean Six Sigma because Lean Six Sigma incorporates many good tools for improvement.
     
    This is the way my organization is going, so I’m going to support it, but that does not change my opinion about a whole lot of wasted effort to create a bunch of belts who are going to become little more than a self-licking ice cream cone once the big ticket projects are completed. The six sigma geek squad is already in my midst. And it would appear that I’m destined to become their baby-sitter once I get promoted to…hang onto your seats folks…a black belt. WOW. How I ever made changes within my organization with out a six sigma black belt is beyond me. Jokes aside, a real concern I have with this belt thing is it’s a lot like a religion, and should a detractor, a heretic such as myself, dare to point out the self-licking aspect of the ice cream cone or the simple truth six sigma is really nothing new, the detractor is disparaged as negative and told they should be thankful their organization identified them as a leader… I think what I have so poorly communicated so far is that after years of seeing things come and go, this craze too will pass as a new wag to this management system is developed by some enterprising consultant and used by some firm to zoom to the top of the Fortune 500. When that time comes, I will once again learn new names for the old principles and march forward. Hats off to all of you, but IMHO the goal is continuous improvement, the goal is not to get green and black belts into every organization on earth…

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    #160912

    Mikel
    Member

    I agree, but as I pointed out in another post, most companies don’t have the focus to solve their most wasteful problems. As long as they keep thier heads slightly above water, they think they are geniuses.

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    #160913

    Craig
    Participant

    Ok Ok….you make some interesting points. I am glad that my lame joke helped motivate you to elaborate on your opinions.
    While none of the six sigma tools are new, I think the structured approach to continuous improvement is something that six sigma brings to the table. It can be overly beauracratic if not managed well, but a well planned deployment (with instructors who understand regression analysis) can really improve the bottom line results for a company. By the way, you should have challenged the instructor on that.
    When I was certified at Motorola, I was in the same boat as you. I had already been through the crash courses on DOE, SPC, etc. in Moto University long before the Six Sigma initiative started. I took advantage of the local university and enrolled in several graduate level statistics classes. After applying these tools in many of my projects, management decided to send me to six sigma training.  Ironically, the series of training classes was called the “Continuous Improvement Curriculum”…..not Six Sigma training! At the end of the training classes, I already had demonstrated the use of the tools and certification was a breeze. I am not bragging, but openly admitting that I am an engineer who enjoys statistics. You can’t get much geekier than that.
    IMHO, management holds the key to success. If they choose something called Six Sigma as the vehicle for improvement, they must understand the process and hold the belts accountable. If Honda doesn’t use Six Sigma, who cares? If Toyota doesn’t use Six Sigma, who cares? My recent “renewal” in Six Sigma was excellent with the George Group. A larger set of tools was packaged well in the DMAIC format. My prior training was stats intensive and lacked many of the other problem solving tools. (C&E matrix, FMEA, control plan interrelationships as an example). Now after investing the time and money in the training, I view this as a joint responsibility for myself and management to make sure I don’t just hang a certificate on my wall, update my resume, and let my new tools collect dust.
     

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    #160914

    fake accrington alert
    Participant

    Please  read  the  book:
    Getting the  Right Things Done:A leader’s guide to  planning and  execution ,by Pascal Dennis
    Strategy deployment is  a  proven planning and  execution approach  used by companies  such  as  Toyota for  more  than 25  years to  engage  people  at  all  levels  of  the  organization and ,in  doing   so,dominate  the  market

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    #160924

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    fake accrington alert,
    We plan our deployments as well. It seems to produce repeatable results. The plan varies on every deployment.
    The only reason I jumped into this string is to suggest you read a book called “Maverick” about Semco and Ricardo Semler. He runs contrary to most organizational structure and management but his results are difficult to argue with.
    An interesting sidelight is he speaks about how well his people innovate because of the environment they work in. Everyone seems to be struggling with what the best tool is to help you innovate when maybe it isn’t tools it could be as simple as how you run the company.
    Just my opinion.
    Regards

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    #160927

    GrayR
    Participant

    While I have posted similar statements to yours in the past concerning the origins of Six Sigma, I think you are off base on some of your comments — particularly related to the “only things” needed for improvement.  There are three things needed:
    – Committment to improve (which you stated in some way)
    – Direction (where is the improvement going to be focused? — in some way, related to your comments on ‘customer’)
    – METHOD (how the improvement will be attained)
    The last point is where you have missed the boat. Six Sigma does provide a METHOD — and I will be the first to say that it has many tools going back to the 1920’s.  But Six Sigma does provide method structure that wasn’t in use prior to that.  (And, as I have said before, statistical software has helped.) 
    As far as Toyota not needing belts, or Ford not needing belts — they both have (had) ‘them’.  Toyota does have experts in training people to use TPS — they are called sensei’s.  And they do have an improvement structure involving the TPS problem solving method. No they aren’t belts, but they play a similar role in metoring employees.  They don’t do much of the process improvement because that is done at the ‘lowest level in the organization’ (see Steven Spears) — basically every team leader & supervisor has to be skilled the method — so I also disagree that Toyota doesn’t need ‘belts’.
    If your organization(s) are getting hung up on the ‘certification’ process then I don’t see that as a Six Sigma problem — that is a problem with your organizations.  Consultants also play a role — there are good and bad ones, but they do play a role.
    BTW — I also agree with a previous post concering Pascal Dennis’ book. Ex-Toyota employee.  He is worth spending some time in his training, and his book on policy deployment shows how ‘Direction’ is deployed and linked in the organization.  Someone seeing his (actually TPS) method may think it similar to other methods, but if you don’t really understand PDCA . . . . then . . .
     (Interestingly, one of Pascal’s stories is about asking a long time Toyota manager about PDCA, and the manager replied that it took him 10 years to understand Plan, and 10 years to understand Do, and 10 years to understand Control, and now he is beginning to understand PDCA . . .).

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    #160932

    fake accrington alert
    Participant

    Great
    Who  is  the publisher?
    thanks  and  regards

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    #164207

    New ATI
    Participant

    In Japan  they  don’t  believe  in SS ,they  think  it  is  a  fad,they believe  in  their  own  version :TQC or the famous TPS.
    BEST

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    #172813

    Mariner191
    Participant

    Quality Colorado – As an owner of a 2006 Honda Civic, the starter motor failed at 25,000 miles. Confirmed by factory-trained technicians. Dealers in the Omaha, NE area “do not keep starter motors in stock, because they never fail”.
    Since the Honda starter failed, since Honda does not keep the part in stock, I was forced to pay out of pocket, to have an under-warranty part replaced, lest I wait a minimum of 4-days for the Honda dealer to receive and install the part.
    Anyone out there interested in obtaining a failed “Six Sigma” part from Honda. The starter is in fact, one in a billion.

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    #172817

    Ron
    Member

    One of the major issue I see in the U.S.A. and other locations is the thought that the “grass is greener on the other side complex”.  The Japanese seem to make a pretty good car let’sdo what they do… Toyota has a production system..let’s do what they do…GE is screwed up let’s not do what they do.
     
    Six Sigma is a problem solving methodology that when coupled with the lean toolkit provides a framework for continuous improvment like none before. Following a defined process is the basis for all improvement efforts.
    Learn to adopt a problem solving methodology obtain the buyin from the variuos perr groups and WOW the competition. Stop looking at someone else for the way your company should work. Each organization is unique and some are bound for failure and somewill succeed. This isn’t luck it is the methodology utilized the greater the participation in the methodology the better the results.

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    #173545

    Dixit
    Member

    yes , they achieved up to 5 sigma  level .
    if the process is running at wide tolerance , for that particular process they will achieve  the  6 sigma .
    Where the CP = 2 ,
     
    Regards
    Vijji
     

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    #175155

    Reci
    Participant

    Mike,
    I am not sure why you think that the quality of Ford and GM are that far from Toyota and Honda today.  Yes, year ago there was a distance in quality but unless you are a designer of an American car company I question you knowledge of the car industry of today.
    I have worked for both American and Japanese automotive companies and have found that there are similar quality issues in both.  In fact, there were many more quality issues with Japanese sub-suppliers then there were with American sub-suppliers. 
     

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